A grassroots organization focused on the intelligent and sustainable development, preservation and revitalization of Tulsa.
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
December 02, 2021, 01:24:23 am
Pages: 1 ... 22 23 [24] 25 26 ... 36   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Tulsa Public Schools Spending  (Read 200929 times)
heironymouspasparagus
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12890



« Reply #345 on: April 02, 2014, 07:51:35 am »

There will never be technology available in the remote areas beyond dial up?

Nothing can be done?  

It hasn't happened yet.  Even with cheap fiber - which has been installed over the last few years with subsidies from government....  Example: Totah Communications.  North of here in OK and KS.  Only company available in the area and stupid expensive for what you get!

Their idea of DSL is 2M/sec at about $65 per month.  Then add on the $15 or so for phone, plus another 40 + minutes fee, or so for long distance.... yeah, if you live in rural Oklahoma, you can certainly do distance learning.... not.


« Last Edit: April 02, 2014, 07:53:33 am by heironymouspasparagus » Logged

"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I donít share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
TeeDub
Guest
« Reply #346 on: April 02, 2014, 07:57:37 am »

It hasn't happened yet.  Even with cheap fiber - which has been installed over the last few years with subsidies from government....  Example: Totah Communications.  North of here in OK and KS.  Only company available in the area and stupid expensive for what you get!

Their idea of DSL is 2M/sec at about $65 per month.  Then add on the $15 or so for phone, plus another 40 + minutes fee, or so for long distance.... yeah, if you live in rural Oklahoma, you can certainly do distance learning.... not.


The problem is that the Universal Service Fund helps support the phone line, but not the broadband.   (Typical case of legislation being outpaced by technology.)   If the FCC moved the support to broadband and treated landline phones as an ancillary service, the price would drop.
Logged
heironymouspasparagus
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12890



« Reply #347 on: April 02, 2014, 08:01:51 am »

The problem is that the Universal Service Fund helps support the phone line, but not the broadband.   (Typical case of legislation being outpaced by technology.)   If the FCC moved the support to broadband and treated landline phones as an ancillary service, the price would drop.


And most of Europe has dramatically better service.  Prices.  Selection of providers.  As with health care and health insurance - another area where we SHOULD be taking notice of the better example.

Logged

"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I donít share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
TeeDub
Guest
« Reply #348 on: April 02, 2014, 10:06:39 am »


And most of Europe has dramatically better service.  Prices.  Selection of providers.  As with health care and health insurance - another area where we SHOULD be taking notice of the better example.



Let's be honest.   Western Europe has great service.   It also doesn't have the low population densities that the US does.   That is how they can support things like rail.   It is hard to make any money (and thus keep rates low) when you have three telephone subscribers per square mile.

Compared to Nowata, Tulsa has great prices, dramatically better service and a selection of providers.   It's called population, it allows those things.
Logged
nathanm
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 8240


« Reply #349 on: April 02, 2014, 01:25:04 pm »

Compared to Nowata, Tulsa has great prices, dramatically better service and a selection of providers.   It's called population, it allows those things.

And compared to Lavaca, Arkansas or Prairie Grove, Arkansas, we have similar selection with worse service. Here, as there, you get a choice between the phone company and the cable company. There, however, the telephone coops have put money into their infrastructure and built out fiber to the premises. The point being that the usual excuses the incumbents use are a bunch of BS even in the current system. Those excuses are completely irrelevant to a public or quasi-public utility model.

Low population density is not something that is restricted only to North America, despite what the phone companies continue to claim.
Logged

"Labor is prior to and independent of capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration" --Abraham Lincoln
rebound
City Father
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1005


WWW
« Reply #350 on: April 02, 2014, 02:23:57 pm »

...It is hard to make any money (and thus keep rates low) when you have three telephone subscribers per square mile.

Actually in the several square miles around where I grew up, it's closer to one house per square mile!  My folks now get their internet via microwave from a provider out of Walters, OK.  I think they have the "enhanced" plan,  1Mb (whoo hoo!) speed and a limit of 40G per month, for $35.  It is painful to be at their house and try to get anything done on the internet.  (They could step up the "Ultra" plan, and get "up to 2Mb" download speed for $45, but that's just to high-falutin' for them right now...)

Going back to the remote learning discussion,  I just can't see it being a real option for the majority of students.  In the rural areas school functions as much more than just a place to learn.  It's a community center and social hub as well.  Just about every school event (even the school plays and such) is a chance to gather.  Taking away  this social aspect, and the chance for social learning in addition to academic, would really be a disservice to that slice of the population.  And of course, as someone else noted, if sports teams are considered important (and they most definitely are in rural areas), the kids need to practice daily during that season anyway.   I'm all for bringing high-speed internet to the rural areas, but would hate to see that used as justification for increasing their physical isolation.

 
Logged

 
Townsend
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12195



« Reply #351 on: April 02, 2014, 03:16:57 pm »


Going back to the remote learning discussion,  I just can't see it being a real option for the majority of students.  In the rural areas school functions as much more than just a place to learn.  It's a community center and social hub as well.  Just about every school event (even the school plays and such) is a chance to gather.  Taking away  this social aspect, and the chance for social learning in addition to academic, would really be a disservice to that slice of the population.  And of course, as someone else noted, if sports teams are considered important (and they most definitely are in rural areas), the kids need to practice daily during that season anyway.   I'm all for bringing high-speed internet to the rural areas, but would hate to see that used as justification for increasing their physical isolation.

 

But if the money's cut from the budget...
Logged
heironymouspasparagus
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12890



« Reply #352 on: April 03, 2014, 02:23:46 pm »

Let's be honest.   Western Europe has great service.   It also doesn't have the low population densities that the US does.   That is how they can support things like rail.   It is hard to make any money (and thus keep rates low) when you have three telephone subscribers per square mile.

Compared to Nowata, Tulsa has great prices, dramatically better service and a selection of providers.   It's called population, it allows those things.


AT&T is about 5 miles away, but won't ever 'visit' the area.... kind of like the truce between lawyers and sharks - it's a professional courtesy thing....
Logged

"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I donít share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
TeeDub
Guest
« Reply #353 on: April 03, 2014, 03:02:46 pm »


AT&T is about 5 miles away, but won't ever 'visit' the area.... kind of like the truce between lawyers and sharks - it's a professional courtesy thing....


Or a required by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission thing.   It's called service territory.    Same reason you can't get PSO and GRDA in the same areas.
Logged
nathanm
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 8240


« Reply #354 on: April 03, 2014, 10:28:09 pm »

Or a required by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission thing.   It's called service territory.

Telecom companies are perfectly free to operate outside of their incumbent area if they so choose.

Edited to add: For some definition of perfectly free that allows for paperwork requirements, that is.
Logged

"Labor is prior to and independent of capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration" --Abraham Lincoln
sauerkraut
City Father
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3223


I Conquered The 2013 -2015 Polar Bear Plunge!!


« Reply #355 on: April 05, 2014, 03:02:04 pm »

The Tulsa Schools have snow days to make up and yet the Tulsa  schools still closed last Monday for some protest. Go figure out that one! The lost days should be made up in full not with just tacking 15 minutes to a school day. How about some Saturday school?
Logged

Proud Global  Warming Deiner! Earth Is Getting Colder NOT Warmer!
TeeDub
Guest
« Reply #356 on: April 05, 2014, 04:46:50 pm »

Telecom companies are perfectly free to operate outside of their incumbent area if they so choose.

Edited to add: For some definition of perfectly free that allows for paperwork requirements, that is.

True.

I stand corrected.  It can be done, just not easily or without lots of paperwork.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2014, 07:01:24 pm by TeeDub » Logged
RecycleMichael
truth teller
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12913


« Reply #357 on: April 05, 2014, 05:40:24 pm »

The Tulsa Schools have snow days to make up and yet the Tulsa  schools still closed last Monday for some protest. Go figure out that one! The lost days should be made up in full not with just tacking 15 minutes to a school day. How about some Saturday school?

Whenever I need advice on education and my children's future, I think of asking you. Saturday school would be impossible for most students, parents, and teachers and would dramatically rise costs for everything from salaries to utility costs. But hey, why not do it anyway?
Logged

Power is nothing till you use it.
swake
T-Town Elder
******
Online Online

Posts: 7995



« Reply #358 on: April 05, 2014, 07:30:59 pm »

Whenever I need advice on education and my children's future, I think of asking you. Saturday school would be impossible for most students, parents, and teachers and would dramatically rise costs for everything from salaries to utility costs. But hey, why not do it anyway?

If anyone needs some additional school time, it's Kraut.
Logged
heironymouspasparagus
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12890



« Reply #359 on: April 06, 2014, 09:27:09 pm »

Or a required by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission thing.   It's called service territory.    Same reason you can't get PSO and GRDA in the same areas.


An Oklahoma Corruption Commission thing....

Logged

"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I donít share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
Pages: 1 ... 22 23 [24] 25 26 ... 36   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
  Hosted by TulsaConnect and Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
 

Mission

 

"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
more...

 

Contact

 

2210 S Main St.
Tulsa, OK 74114
(918) 409-2669
info@tulsanow.org