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November 18, 2017, 05:51:59 am
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Author Topic: Completeing the Gilcrease Hills expressway  (Read 3943 times)
Hoss
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« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2016, 08:34:54 pm »

I knew some people back in the 80's and the early 90's that lived in that area between Chandler Park/Berryhill and West 41st and I would tell them that I forgot about that area, and they would say "That's why we moved there." W 41st & Hwy 97 was where they shopped and I want to say back then it was a Safeway that became a Homeland store was where the went, and working downtown was a nice drive with way less traffic. It's what a 15 to 20 minute drive from that area into downtown?

Not really...unless there is construction or a wreck...97 to downtown now is about 10 minutes.  However for me I get into downtown from that stretch by taking the Quanah exit.
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Conan71
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« Reply #16 on: September 08, 2016, 08:35:53 pm »

It's what a 15 to 20 minute drive from that area into downtown?

If that.
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« Reply #17 on: September 08, 2016, 10:06:56 pm »

Been a while, what can I say. Have to say I think it's stupid to cut through that area now. Maybe back in the 60's when it would have connected all of the manufacturing along Charles Page, west 21st and over to where Unit Rig and all the manufacturing that was/is in that area. But with the Red Fork 244/444 and highway 97 it just seems pointless, unlike the heads of many in charge at the state. (Bless their little hearts)
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« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2016, 09:29:27 am »

Been a while, what can I say. Have to say I think it's stupid to cut through that area now. Maybe back in the 60's when it would have connected all of the manufacturing along Charles Page, west 21st and over to where Unit Rig and all the manufacturing that was/is in that area. But with the Red Fork 244/444 and highway 97 it just seems pointless, unlike the heads of many in charge at the state. (Bless their little hearts)

Agreed.  The Chas. Page industrial corridor has been dying a slow death for a few decades.  This is to stroke a few egos and as someone else suspects, people sitting on property in the area (who don’t live on it) probably think they can gain from a highway cross-cutting the land.

North Tulsans will be told this will really benefit them and create new jobs and they will fall for this like every other panacea for their economy that’s been promised over the years.  In reality, a few people will gain financially.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2016, 09:40:35 am by Conan71 » Logged

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« Reply #19 on: September 09, 2016, 11:37:01 am »

What are the challenges with reviving the Charles Page industrial corridor? 
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« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2016, 12:11:33 pm »

What are the challenges with reviving the Charles Page industrial corridor?  

The area I was referring to is the stretch from the old ADC to just past where the Knotty Pine was. There is still manufacturing happening there, but I doubt it will be what it was during the 50's through the 70's. At that time it was all petrochemical based, and at times there were three shifts working there to keep up. The shrinking oil industry in the 80's and 90's is what killed it off. If you draw a line from Sheffield Steel to the airport, (basically along the rail line) that was the petrochemical corridor for lack of a better way, and then you had a similar area Oakhurst area around I-44 and 49th W Ave. over to the refineries. I think the other issue along that stretch of Charles Page would be the clean up involved to build something new even if it was manufacturing. It's similar to where Storey Wrecker is, or the old Fin Tube sight.

To revive it, I think you will need a new industrial revolution so to speak, but manufacturing in the US has shrunk so much in the last 30+ years I don't think it will ever be what it was.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2016, 12:21:29 pm by dbacksfan 2.0 » Logged
Conan71
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« Reply #21 on: September 09, 2016, 12:30:10 pm »

What are the challenges with reviving the Charles Page industrial corridor? 

Old buildings and crumbling infrastructure are two things which come to mind.  Some of the industries have been sent off-shore or consolidated elsewhere in the state or country, others have found better spots elsewhere around the area like the Port of Catoosa. 

If you mean as to repurpose buildings along the corridor, there’s not much attractive along there for repurposing into other uses, JMO.  There’s some good brick buildings but corrugated steel panel seems to be pretty ubiquitous through there.
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« Reply #22 on: September 09, 2016, 10:16:38 pm »

There is a Frank Lloyd Wright building in the area and of course the old Cord auto manufacturing plant.
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« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2016, 03:55:09 pm »

There is a Frank Lloyd Wright building in the area and of course the old Cord auto manufacturing plant.

Where are those?  I can't place the FLW and was unaware Cord had a place out on the line.  Were they the reproduction Cords or the original plant?
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« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2016, 04:23:33 pm »

The Cord plant is right where the railroad crosses Charles Page diagonally across from the old Knotty Pine Barbeque.  Red brick. Its actually for sale right now. I think it is the original. There was a newer one in Broken Arrow.

The FLW is a bit farther east towards downtown on the south side of Charles Page. Its glass brick windows have been covered up and it has a deco look to it. Seems like it was a valve company. I go by there occasionally so I'll check it out.
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« Reply #25 on: September 14, 2016, 10:10:55 am »

Speaking of Sand Springs and their industrial district here is some good news:

Quote
Major industrial park development at former steel mill site to change heart of Sand Springs

The Sand Springs City Council has entered into an agreement to be a part of a major redevelopment plan for the former Sheffield Steel mill in the middle of the city.

Officials said the project will breathe new life into a very visible part of Sand Springs.

“This will be transformative for generations for the citizens of Sand Springs,” City Manager Elizabeth Gray said.

The Sheffield Steel plant and rail line to Tulsa were purchased by Gerdau Ameristeel, which eventually halted production in 2009. OmniTRAX bought the site in 2014, apparently with plans for redevelopment.

Major highlights of the proposal include the demolition of some of the former mill’s massive metal structures, which directly abut the west side of Oklahoma 97 and can be seen from U.S. 412 toward the south.

About 26 acres of the property are planned for retail development. For city officials, that could translate not only to jobs but also sales-tax revenue.

Per the development agreement Monday, the city eventually would have an option to buy a 10-acre parcel for use as a public-safety complex. Officials said that project has about $10 million through the city’s Vision renewal, which Sand Springs voters approved last fall.

Other public funding needed for the redevelopment would be for construction on Morrow Road along the project’s north border from Oklahoma 97 to Broad Street, Gray said.

“We’ve been working on this for about six months,” Gray said. “But we want to give as much credit to the OmniTRAX people.”

Sand Springs officials had previously planned the public-safety complex for property on the west side of the city, but met public pushback due in part because the proposed facility was not in a central location.

Gray and other officials said building the police, fire, 911 and municipal court facility on part of the former Sheffield Steel property is the perfect opportunity to keep it centralized.

“That’s not a done deal either,” Vice Mayor John Fothergill said. “We’re definitely going to take it to the public.”

Fothergill said he hopes residents agree that a public-private partnership to redevelop the former steel plant is a strong opportunity.

“It was something that we needed anyway,” Fothergill said. “We can put police just about anywhere, but you really want your fire department centrally located.”

Fothergill said OmniTRAX has a track record of buying rail lines and then fueling development all along the lines.

“I think it’s going to be bigger than this,” Fothergill said. “This is just the Sheffield site. That rail goes all the way through Sand Springs and into Tulsa and unincorporated (Tulsa) County property.”

Fothergill pointed at Charles Page Boulevard, which runs along the line, as an area ripe for redevelopment.

Tulsa County Commissioner Karen Keith said she hopes the redevelopment of the property will repair damage to Sand Springs done when the jobs at the steel mill were lost.

“When they lost those jobs, it was just brutal,” Keith said. “Elizabeth (Gray) is a hero in pulling this together. She’s bringing life back into the community.”

jarrel.wade@tulsaworld.com

http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/government/major-industrial-park-development-at-former-steel-mill-site-to/article_63d4aa59-e776-5dd0-b593-a53ac1b34859.html
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« Reply #26 on: September 14, 2016, 11:02:23 am »


North Tulsans will be told this will really benefit them and create new jobs and they will fall for this like every other panacea for their economy that’s been promised over the years.  In reality, a few people will gain financially.

Councilor Jack Henderson is the only vocal person from District 1 that I have heard touting this highway. North Tulsa is easy to get around in...and there is already H75 cutting up neighborhoods. This highway will not be for the residents...it will be for people that want to easily get through north Tulsa on their way to a burb.
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« Reply #27 on: September 14, 2016, 11:10:45 am »

The Cord plant is right where the railroad crosses Charles Page diagonally across from the old Knotty Pine Barbeque.  Red brick. Its actually for sale right now. I think it is the original. There was a newer one in Broken Arrow.

The FLW is a bit farther east towards downtown on the south side of Charles Page. Its glass brick windows have been covered up and it has a deco look to it. Seems like it was a valve company. I go by there occasionally so I'll check it out.

I'm interested in the possible FLW building. My understanding is that the only FLW building in Tulsa is WestHope. (Currently for sale, if anyone is looking for a really cool fixer-upper.)   

Do you think this is actually FLW, or is it Bruce Goff, or another of FLW's disciples?  (Just checked the Goff site, and can't find anything there, either.)

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« Reply #28 on: September 14, 2016, 11:19:30 am »

Speaking of Sand Springs and their industrial district here is some good news:

Not to be that guy, but let's check back in 5 years and see what happened.
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Bamboo World
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« Reply #29 on: September 14, 2016, 11:41:20 am »




North Tulsa is easy to get around in...and there is already H75 cutting up neighborhoods. This highway will not be for the residents...


True.

Something I've admired about Tulsa's development is the relatively pristine natural beauty in the Osage County northwest quadrant, reaching very near to the central business district.  If the Gilcrease Expressway loop is completed, it will chop and spoil that natural beauty, similar to the way the landscape of Tulsa Hills has been ruined by the development along Highway 75 south of 61st Street.  A few years ago, that corridor along Highway 75 was a gorgeous oak forest.
   
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