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November 24, 2017, 07:54:36 pm
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Author Topic: “Economic Development” Means Gentrification for North Tulsa  (Read 3155 times)
swake
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« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2017, 03:44:00 pm »

I don’t think that is quite accurate on the Aldi business model.  They have had stores in Oklahoma for at least 10 years if not more without alcohol sales.  Aldi’s business model is much closer to that of Save-A-Lot than it is Trader Joe’s.  TJ’s isn’t really full service, but they are more heavily staffed than any Aldi or Save-A-Lot I’ve been in.  Usually those stores will operate on 4-6 employees at any given time from what I have observed. 

And Aldi and Trader Joes aren't actually related, it's two companies owned by different members of the same family with similar but not matching business models. Aldi's business model is to sell house brands only at deep discounts limiting the number of items sold limiting inventory and shipping costs. Trader Joe's sells high quality items that are mostly house brands but have a much larger selection. TJ's items aren't as price sensitive thought they are cheaper than Whole Foods. Normally wine is a big part of TJ's business model.
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Hoss
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« Reply #16 on: April 12, 2017, 05:20:46 pm »


There is a Warehouse Market on N sheridan and a Warehouse Market on N Peoria that has been in business for many years now. Sav-a-Lot on N Lewis and a Las Americas on N Lewis. So there are grocery stores in that area that are profitable, and obviously there is a demand. There are food deserts in that part of town, I'm pretty sure that area could support another.

To be a nitpicker, though....both of those WMs are not truly considered "north Tulsa".  The one on Sheridan is just about a stone's throw north of I-244 (for what it's worth I consider North Tulsa anything north of Apache and west of Harvard).  The one on Peoria, while technically in North Tulsa, is far north.  The closer you get to 66th the more it's considered Turley or South Sperry.  I used to work about 52nd N and Peoria for about a year (just across the street from McClain) and the difference a mile makes is pretty substantial.  But it's still a long ways between 63rd ST north/Peoria and King/Sheridan.
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brettakins
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« Reply #17 on: April 13, 2017, 07:09:47 am »

To be a nitpicker, though....both of those WMs are not truly considered "north Tulsa".  The one on Sheridan is just about a stone's throw north of I-244 (for what it's worth I consider North Tulsa anything north of Apache and west of Harvard).  The one on Peoria, while technically in North Tulsa, is far north.  The closer you get to 66th the more it's considered Turley or South Sperry.  I used to work about 52nd N and Peoria for about a year (just across the street from McClain) and the difference a mile makes is pretty substantial.  But it's still a long ways between 63rd ST north/Peoria and King/Sheridan.



Who says they are not considered north Tulsa? North Tulsa is north of downtown correct? We could be technical about the exact location but I'm going to guess a large percentage of Warehouse Market's clientele on N Peoria are citizens of north tulsa, given that is the only grocery in that area and the same goes for the Warehouse Market on N Sheridan.

« Last Edit: April 13, 2017, 07:27:50 am by brettakins » Logged
guido911
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« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2017, 10:41:44 pm »



Who says they are not considered north Tulsa? North Tulsa is north of downtown correct? We could be technical about the exact location but I'm going to guess a large percentage of Warehouse Market's clientele on N Peoria are citizens of north tulsa, given that is the only grocery in that area and the same goes for the Warehouse Market on N Sheridan.



Man, it's not like North Tulsa is 1000 miles away or on some island. Grocery shopping can actually be accessed by use of an automobile, and folks up in NT can drive anywhere to get groceries in short order.
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« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2017, 08:41:12 am »

Man, it's not like North Tulsa is 1000 miles away or on some island. Grocery shopping can actually be accessed by use of an automobile, and folks up in NT can drive anywhere to get groceries in short order.

And if it were on and island, they could use a boat.  Amiright?
Granted, the neighborhood would have a low swimability index.
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patric
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« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2017, 08:49:16 am »

Man, it's not like North Tulsa is 1000 miles away or on some island. Grocery shopping can actually be accessed by use of an automobile, and folks up in NT can drive anywhere to get groceries in short order.


Those who do all their shopping around Tulsa Transit schedules and routes have a bit more of a challenge.
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swake
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« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2017, 10:32:12 am »

Those who do all their shopping around Tulsa Transit schedules and routes have a bit more of a challenge.

He knows that, but doesn't give a crap.
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Townsend
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« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2017, 11:17:34 am »

Man, it's not like North Tulsa is 1000 miles away or on some island. Grocery shopping can actually be accessed by use of an automobile, and folks up in NT can drive anywhere to get groceries in short order.


That's pretty removed from reality.
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« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2017, 04:57:47 pm »

Those who do all their shopping around Tulsa Transit schedules and routes have a bit more of a challenge.

Good luck doing anything with Tulsa Transit. Headway times are way too long.
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« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2017, 08:32:54 pm »

People are mad that Reasor's at 51st and Harvard closed since now there are "no grocery stores nearby"
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guido911
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« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2017, 09:01:18 pm »

People are mad that Reasor's at 51st and Harvard closed since now there are "no grocery stores nearby"

Those using Tulsa Transit hardest hit?
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« Reply #26 on: April 16, 2017, 11:44:27 am »

People are mad that Reasor's at 51st and Harvard closed since now there are "no grocery stores nearby"

They are now doing 25% off all purchases.  I will miss this store because it is(was ) my local corner store. 
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« Reply #27 on: April 17, 2017, 07:33:46 am »

They are now doing 25% off all purchases.

Went in a week ago.  It's VERY picked over.    Picked up a few things and some cleaning supplies
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #28 on: April 17, 2017, 09:18:45 am »

Very few places in North Tulsa are in danger of gentrification any time soon, especially the corner in question. Gentrification is definitely happening west of TU and east of downtown and in the Brady Heights neighborhood, but most of North Tulsa is full of cheap real estate. The real issue is affordable housing in livable conditions in a safe walkable area, but few places in Tulsa have that (basically none, although Pearl/Whittier have some of the best walkability right now with pretty cheap rent).

I can see the frustration in more and more Dollar General-type stores going in, but that's not really something the City Counsel is made to regulate (as was made clear after the CVS going in at 15th and Utica fiasco). You can argue the dollar general improves access to goods needed in the area. I can see that it might also discourage a grocery store from going in (competition on some items) and make it seem like the neighborhood has access to groceries, even though it is subpar with few healthy options and no fresh produce.

Within the next 10 years, perhaps Brady Heights will fill in more with rehabbed homes and just north of downtown could see some improvement, but I don't see homeowners being forced out or rent going through the roof in most areas in North Tulsa because of gentrification. I think the bigger issue is homes and neighborhoods declining with fewer decent places to rent (and that causes rent to go up for decent places).
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johrasephoenix
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« Reply #29 on: April 17, 2017, 10:50:40 am »

If the urban renewal area between Brady Heights and OSU - Tulsa ever gets developed in a cool way, I could see that whole Greenwood/Brady Heights area south of Pine really taking off.  It's the only single family neighborhood in the whole city that is actually walkable to the cool parts of downtown.

Riverview and the Pearl and Owen Park are walkable to downtown too, but they connect to underdeveloped zones and/or oceans of surface parking. 
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