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August 19, 2018, 09:21:07 am
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Author Topic: Tulsa's Transportation Model  (Read 7932 times)
carltonplace
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« on: December 17, 2013, 08:32:46 am »

Will Tulsa face the same problems as Austin? We certainly have the same mindset and disdain for public transportation and love of our cars, highways and parking lots.

http://www.npr.org/2013/12/17/248757580/even-an-85-mph-highway-cant-fix-austins-traffic-tangle

Four decades ago, Austin, Texas, had a population of 250,000 and a reputation as a laid-back oasis of liberal politics and live music. Today, the Austin metro area is home to 1.8 million people and has some of the nation's worst traffic congestion.

For years, the city has done little to address the growing problem. But most in the Texas capital now agree something has to change if Austin is to save what's left of its quirky character.


"I used to feel like I could go anywhere in 12 minutes," says Amy Scofield, a successful artist who has lived and worked in Austin for more than 22 years. "And I still have that mentality, and now I'm late all the time. And I'm stressed out all the time because a 12-minute trip takes 25 at least."
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Conan71
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« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2013, 09:46:18 am »

I was in Austin in March of ’09 and went back this last April. I was really shocked at how much worse the congestion had become in that short amount of time.
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« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2013, 03:30:06 pm »

While planning for and growing mass transit would have helped, a city that grows by a multiple of 7 over a few decades is going to have congestion problems.  And, yes, Ms. Scofield, that means it will take longer than 12 minutes to get from anywhere to anywhere no matter your mode of transportation.
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« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2013, 04:14:09 pm »

Will Tulsa face the same problems as Austin?

No, that's absurd.  Our growth rate is way too slow, almost non existent, to negative actually.  More likely to face something similar to Detroit the way we are going.  Actually, over the last 5 years Tulsa has lost more jobs, percentage wise than Detroit has. Meanwhile Austin has gained tremendously.       
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« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2013, 02:11:55 pm »

Every city in Texas is booming and growing fast. I lived in the D/FW area back in the 1980's and I thought traffic was bad then, I-30 was always traffic choked, the Central Expressway was the pits,  today when I drive down to D/FW roads are really choked, each morning the I-820 loop at  I-35W connection in north Fort Worth is always backed up, sure they expanded and widened the roads, but more roads are still needed and wider roads are needed to keep up with the growth. Tulsa's city population is slugglish we are still under the 400,000 mark, the city of Omaha out grew Tulsa in the past decade with a population of over 400,000, however Tulsa's metro area is growing fast. Austin Texas is really booming they have many high tech industries attracting many people plus all the schools in the area. Maybe Tulsa  needs an idenity.
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jacobi
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« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2013, 05:11:02 pm »

Maybe we need a 4 year, residential, public university?  Austin would not have a shot at growing they way it has without UT there.  Don't we have a school of some kind near downtown.....


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« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2013, 05:39:27 pm »

Maybe we need a 4 year, residential, public university?  Austin would not have a shot at growing they way it has without UT there.  Don't we have a school of some kind near downtown.....


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Yes we do, but they wouldn't want to grow the university downtown because that would be a huge catalyst for increased growth in the city, and state, and make that university even more desirable and competitive, so instead the money is spent to grow the university in Stillwater instead which will not have nearly as large a positive impact on the city, state and university. 
« Last Edit: December 21, 2013, 05:41:25 pm by TheArtist » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2013, 02:06:57 pm »

Yes we do, but they wouldn't want to grow the university downtown because that would be a huge catalyst for increased growth in the city, and state, and make that university even more desirable and competitive, so instead the money is spent to grow the university in Stillwater instead which will not have nearly as large a positive impact on the city, state and university. 

Spot on.
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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2014, 12:09:45 am »

I am hopeful that myopic way of thinking will eventually change and OSU realizes the benefits of having a thriving urban 4 year university, research center and hospital in downtown Tulsa in addition to the main campus in Stillwater.
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jacobi
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« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2014, 07:44:07 am »

I am hopeful that myopic way of thinking will eventually change and OSU realizes the benefits of having a thriving urban 4 year university, research center and hospital in downtown Tulsa in addition to the main campus in Stillwater.

I understand OSU's reticence to dilute their student body and programs.  The thing is that OSU Tulsa should have different programs to keep the campuses unique.  I propose a brewery science program like UC Davis.  1. It would attract people from out of state to the school so Tulsa and Stilly wouldn't be pulling from the same pool of people.  2. It would be a great feather our cap to have one of the few programs in the field.  3.  Imagine all of the brewers running around Tulsa.  We would have to change the drillers name.


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« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2014, 09:16:18 am »

I understand OSU's reticence to dilute their student body and programs.  The thing is that OSU Tulsa should have different programs to keep the campuses unique.  I propose a brewery science program like UC Davis.  1. It would attract people from out of state to the school so Tulsa and Stilly wouldn't be pulling from the same pool of people.  2. It would be a great feather our cap to have one of the few programs in the field.  3.  Imagine all of the brewers running around Tulsa.  We would have to change the drillers name.


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Innovative course programs is a great idea.  What are some other less common programs aside from brewing science that would make sense as an attraction to out-of-state students?  OSU Tulsa could gain a reputation for having a wide selection of less common degree programs.
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« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2014, 10:43:17 am »

Renewable energy engineering.  A good buddy of mine got his undergrad in ME at OSU but had to go to Lubbock to study wind turbine design for his masters.


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« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2014, 10:54:19 am »

I understand OSU's reticence to dilute their student body and programs.  The thing is that OSU Tulsa should have different programs to keep the campuses unique.  I propose a brewery science program like UC Davis.

The special interests would smoot all over that.
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« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2014, 01:19:03 pm »

The special interests would smoot all over that.
It would be interesting to see the arguments against.  It wouldn't have anything to do with cutting into Jarbo's business.  As long as we kissed his ring (hell endow a chair in his name) the only people left would be fundies.  I don't think they would win on this.  Then again, never underestimate Okies' ability to trash a good idea.


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« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2014, 05:57:25 am »

Will Tulsa face the same problems as Austin? We certainly have the same mindset and disdain for public transportation and love of our cars, highways and parking lots.

http://www.npr.org/2013/12/17/248757580/even-an-85-mph-highway-cant-fix-austins-traffic-tangle

Four decades ago, Austin, Texas, had a population of 250,000 and a reputation as a laid-back oasis of liberal politics and live music. Today, the Austin metro area is home to 1.8 million people and has some of the nation's worst traffic congestion.

For years, the city has done little to address the growing problem. But most in the Texas capital now agree something has to change if Austin is to save what's left of its quirky character.


"I used to feel like I could go anywhere in 12 minutes," says Amy Scofield, a successful artist who has lived and worked in Austin for more than 22 years. "And I still have that mentality, and now I'm late all the time. And I'm stressed out all the time because a 12-minute trip takes 25 at least."

Tulsa's network of highways was better arranged than Austin's to begin with, though they are in the process of fixing some of the issues, building your way out of congestion rarely works (especially at the rate they are growing). Though one benefit though is it is somewhat useful to those who want development of walk-able neighborhoods downtown or adjacent to it.
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