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Author Topic: Republican Party seems divided...  (Read 13762 times)
RecycleMichael
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« on: January 05, 2013, 01:53:02 pm »

Republican Party seems as divided, angry as ever

BOSTON (AP) — The Republican Party seems as divided and angry as ever.
 
Infighting has penetrated the highest levels of the House GOP leadership. Long-standing geographic tensions have increased, pitting endangered Northeastern Republicans against their colleagues from other parts of the country. Enraged tea party leaders are threatening to knock off dozens of Republicans who supported a measure that raised taxes on the nation's highest earners. "People are mad as hell. I'm right there with them," Amy Kremer, chairman of the Tea Party Express, said late last week, declaring that she has "no confidence" in the party her members typically support. Her remarks came after GOP lawmakers agreed to higher taxes but no broad spending cuts as part of a deal to avert the "fiscal cliff."
 
"Anybody that voted 'yes' in the House should be concerned" about primary challenges in 2014, she said.
 
At the same time, one of the GOP's most popular voices, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, blasted his party's "toxic internal politics" after House Republicans initially declined to approve disaster relief for victims of Superstorm Sandy. He said it was "disgusting to watch" their actions and he faulted the GOP's most powerful elected official, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. The GOP's internal struggles to figure out what it wants to be were painfully exposed after Mitt Romney's loss to President Barack Obama on Nov. 6, but they have exploded in recent days. The fallout could extend well beyond the party's ability to win policy battles on Capitol Hill. It could hamper Republicans as they examine how to regroup and attract new voters after a disheartening election season.
 
To a greater degree than the Democrats, the Republican Party has struggled with internal divisions for the past few years. But these latest clashes have seemed especially public and vicious. "It's disappointing to see infighting in the party," said Ryan Williams, a Republican operative and former Romney aide. "It doesn't make us look like we're in a position to challenge the president and hold him accountable to the promises he made." What's largely causing the dissension? A lack of a clear GOP leader with a single vision for the party.
 
Republicans haven't had a consistent standard-bearer since President George W. Bush left office in 2008 with the nation on the edge of a financial collapse. His departure, along with widespread economic concerns, gave rise to a tea party movement that infused the GOP's conservative base with energy. The tea party is credited with broad Republican gains in the 2010 congressional elections, but it's also blamed for the rising tension between the pragmatic and ideological wings of the party — discord that festers still. It was much the same for Democrats in the late 1980s before Bill Clinton emerged to win the White House and shift his party to the political center.
 
2012 presidential nominee Romney never fully captured the hearts of his party's most passionate voters. But his tenure atop the party was short-lived; since Election Day, he's disappeared from the political world. Those Republican leaders who remain engaged — Christie, Boehner, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus — are showing little sign of coming together. Those on the GOP's deep bench of potential 2016 presidential contenders, including Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, have begun staking out their own, sometimes conflicting ideas for the party.
 
Over the short term at least, the party's divisions probably will continue to be exposed. Obama has outlined a second-term agenda focused on immigration and gun control; those are issues that would test Republican solidarity even in good times. Deep splits already exist between Republican pragmatists and the conservative base, who oppose any restrictions on guns or allowances for illegal immigrants. It's unclear whether Obama can exploit the GOP fissures or whether the Republican dysfunction will hamper him. With Boehner unable to control his fractured caucus, the White House is left wondering how to deal with the House on any divisive issue.
 
Fiscal issues aren't going away, with lawmakers were agree on a broad deficit-reduction package. The federal government reached its borrowing limit last week, so Congress has about two months or three months to raise the debt ceiling or risk a default on federal debt. Massive defense and domestic spending cuts are set to take effect in late February. By late March, the current spending plan will end, raising the possibility of a government shutdown.
 
Frustrated conservative activists and GOP insiders hope that the continued focus on fiscal matters will help unite the factions as the party pushes for deep spending cuts. That fight also may highlight Democratic divisions because the party's liberal wing vehemently opposes any changes to Social Security or Medicare. "Whenever you lose the White House, the party's going to have ups and downs," said Republican strategist Ron Kaufman. "My guess is when the spending issues come up again, the Democrats' warts will start to show as well."
 
The GOP's fissures go beyond positions on issues. They also are geographical. Once a strong voice in the party, moderate Republicans across the Northeast are nearly extinct. Many of those who remain were frustrated in recent days when Boehner temporarily blocked a vote on a disaster relief bill. Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., said campaign donors in the Northeast who give the GOP after the slight "should have their head examined."
 
Boehner, who just won a second term as speaker, quickly scheduled a vote on a narrower measure for Friday after the new Congress convened, and it rushed out a $9.7 billion measure to help pay flood insurance claims. Weary Republican strategists are trying to be hopeful about the GOP's path ahead, and liken the current situation to party's struggles after Obama's 2008 election. At the time, some pundits questioned the viability of the Republican Party. But it came roaring back two years later, thanks largely to the tea party.
 
"If we have learned anything from the fiscal cliff fiasco, conservatives discovered we need to stand firm, and stand together, on our principles from beginning to end," said Republican strategist Alice Stewart. "It's frustrating to see the GOP drop the ball and turn a position of true compromise into total surrender. The Democrats succeeded in their strategy of divide and conquer."

http://news.yahoo.com/republican-party-seems-divided-angry-ever-140632093--election.html
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« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2013, 03:04:36 pm »

  This is going to be interesting.  I think the majority of people were supportive of Obama and his stance of "shared sacrifice" and both sides having to give up something.  The president "got his" with this last round, but here pretty quick he and the Dems are going to have to do their part of the sacrifice equation.  

The president is talking about not cutting things (and perhaps even upping spending) that will help grow the economy like education and infrastructure, fine.  Also, he wants to cut more tax loopholes to raise revenue, fine.    but...

Even with those things, there aren't enough loopholes to cut and I read an article recently showing that even with the best reasonable growth amounts we could possibly hope for,,, BOTH of those together are still not enough to get us out of the whole we are in.   Used to be you could indeed grow your way out of things.  But not anymore, the problem (debt and deficits) has become so large that there will also HAVE to be cuts in government spending. And we all know danged well that those cuts and reforms are going to have to come from the big social programs that the liberal faction of the Democratic party say they won't touch. There is not enough left in the other programs, including the military, even if you cut them all to zero, to get us out of the hole.

All the growth in the world (so to speak), plus all the investment in the world, plus cutting all the rest of the government (military, education, etc) to zero, would still not be enough.  Couple terms ago you could have done it.  But not now. The government will have to both cut spending and entitlements.

Been on the presidents side, but only because he has been championing fair and balanced, that each side is going to have to sacrifice.  Sooner or later the people are going to be like "Ok mr President and Democrats, you got your revenue... where are the cuts?"  And it has to be enough cuts to make a difference.
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« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2013, 04:50:29 pm »

We have a two party election system same as those countries in the Mid-East where the people are screaming and firing guns in the streets.  It is liken Athens when under the attack of the military of Rome.  We have depleted our treasury and turn our once robust economy into a debtor prison where there is no escape. We have allowed the exporting of our technology increasing foreign jobs.  We are buying their products and cannot or will not pay for the imbalance of trade.  But there is good news as we are going to increase our debt ceiling causing more inflation. 

But there is more good news as with the unemployment and inflation increasing that will build a new set of RR tracks through the front door of the white house for another third term president.           
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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2013, 06:51:30 pm »

Just a quick question here about deficits, debt, etc. - as relate to the association the Republicontins try so hard to make between Social Security and all this messy debt stuff.

You do realize that Social Security is NOT the problem?  It does NOT add to the deficit OR the debt.  It in fact, has a $3 trillion dollar or so surplus right now that is keeping the whole thing afloat - "invested" in treasuries.  It is paid for - at a surplus for 25 + years until middle of last year - by FICA taxes. 

And the whole idea that it is "bankrupt" could be completely eliminated by slightly raising the upper income limit where those taxes are withheld.  Back at their last "fix", that number was lower than today's level.  Today, I hear numbers in the $150 to 200k range.  Which, yes, would mean that once again, people getting the biggest breaks would lose some of that break.

Or we could all just start dying a little bit quicker.... Soylent Green!  Or maybe "Logan's Run"....that might be the quickest way to fix the problem, actually.



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« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2013, 05:02:52 pm »

Been on the presidents side, but only because he has been championing fair and balanced, that each side is going to have to sacrifice.  Sooner or later the people are going to be like "Ok mr President and Democrats, you got your revenue... where are the cuts?"  And it has to be enough cuts to make a difference.

Thus far there have been over $1.5 trillion in spending cuts with less than $600 billion in new revenue. Interest savings take the total deficit reduction to something around $2.4 trillion over the next 10 years. I'd say the President is holding up his end of the bargain plus some.
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« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2013, 06:23:42 pm »

Thus far there have been over $1.5 trillion in spending cuts with less than $600 billion in new revenue. Interest savings take the total deficit reduction to something around $2.4 trillion over the next 10 years. I'd say the President is holding up his end of the bargain plus some.

Washington is noted for calling a decrease in an increase a cut.  We are still spending way too much money.  What to cut is the problem.  I'm glad I have no kids to pass this mess to.  I also hope you and your kids can afford to support me in my old age.  Grin
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« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2013, 07:31:27 pm »

It was reported that that we bought some 46 billion dollars in merchandise from foreign countries with unsecured credit two months back.  This is presumed to be from corporate America that is producing the articles we purchased with cheap labor in plants that the corporations own.  There are no taxes collected on these transactions except normal sales taxes.  We struggle it off as “necessary balance of payments“.  The payment of 2.5 trillion dollars on our borrowed debt each decade would require over sixty five years to pay off if no money was spent to operate government.   

If one divides some 400 million population into the 46 billion dollars BAP by 400 millions,  there is no way to avoid going over the cliff as the 15.6 trillion dollar increases at each sunset and 100% taxation will not cover our liabilities.  Wake up USA you have had your beer bust now address your head ache. 
   
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« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2013, 10:12:32 am »

Colin Powell blasts GOP's intolerance

http://www.usatoday.com/story/onpolitics/2013/01/14/colin-powell-republican-party-criticism-intolerance/1832833/

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Colin Powell did more than defend Defense secretary nominee Chuck Hagel on Sunday morning TV. The former secretary of State also strongly condemned his Republican Party, calling it out for a "dark vein of intolerance."

"I think the Republican Party right now is having an identity problem and I'm still a Republican," Powell said on NBC's Meet the Press, as he lamented a "significant shift to the right" that has resulted in losing presidential campaigns in 2008 and 2012.

There's been lots of hand-wringing about the GOP since Mitt Romney lost the 2012 presidential election, and Powell's comments are similar to those made by Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal and ex-Florida governor Jeb Bush. While conservatives may hold some of the GOP's top leadership posts, Powell is still someone who commands respect.

Powell, the first African American to be the nation's top diplomat, went on to explain that his intolerance comment was directed at those in the GOP who "still sort of look down on minorities." He also said the Republican Party has to define what it stands for.

"If it's just going to represent the far right wing of the political spectrum, I think the party is in difficulty," said Powell, who said he voted for a GOP presidential candidate seven times in a row before voting for President Obama twice. "I'm a moderate, but I'm still a Republican."

Powell's remarks also come as former Utah governor Jon Huntsman, a one-time GOP presidential candidate, and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, briefly a registered Republican before becoming an independent, take steps to revive the middle ground in politics.
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« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2013, 11:51:43 am »

Colin Powell blasts GOP's intolerance

Townsend,
Did you get a job with the DNC?
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« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2013, 01:01:35 pm »

Townsend,
Did you get a job with the DNC?

I've tired of the direction the GOP has taken.

Too much time is being spent on things I think should be put to bed while things I care about are being ignored.

Don't get me wrong, I blame the DNC as well but the GOP is leading the race.
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« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2013, 11:30:19 pm »

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Democrats taunt GOP House members before party retreat

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/democrats-taunt-gop-house-members-party-retreat-151726259--election.html
Suggested House Republican Retreat Agenda Items

Have breakfast paid for by lobbyists

How to stop talking about “legitimate rape” and insulting women

Science 101

Creating tax breaks and tax shelters for millionaire campaign donors

Math course on counting to 218 votes

A primer on the stock market crash of 1929 and how you could be responsible for the next one.

Coup d’etat prevention and planning

Trust falls

Big-picture thinking

Practice interacting with women and minority voters

How to increase our approval ratings: What root canals, traffic jams, cockroaches and head lice are doing right

Remedial hurricane recovery

Your inner Tea Party and you

Have dinner paid for by lobbyists
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« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2013, 12:39:54 pm »

Colin Powell Slams ‘Idiot Presentations’ by Some Republicans, Urges GOP Leaders to ‘Speak Out’

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2013/01/colin-powell-slams-idiot-presentations-by-some-republicans-urges-gop-leaders-to-speak-out-2/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

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In an interview with ABC’s Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos during ABC’s special inauguration day coverage this morning, former Secretary of State Colin Powell lashed out at people in the Republican Party who spent the last four years spreading “birther nonsense” and other “things that demonize the president,” calling on GOP leaders to denounce such talk — publicly.

“Republicans have to stop buying into things that demonize the president. I mean, why aren’t Republican leaders shouting out about all this birther nonsense and all these other things? They should speak out. This is the kind of intolerance that I’ve been talking about where these idiot presentations continue to be made and you don’t see the senior leadership of the party say, ‘No, that’s wrong.’ In fact, sometimes by not speaking out, they’re encouraging it. And the base keeps buying the stuff.

“And it’s killing the base of the party. I mean, 26 percent favorability rating for the party right now. It ought to be telling them something. So, instead of attacking me or whoever speaks like I do, look in the mirror and realize, ‘How are we going to win the next election?”

But Powell, who served as National Security Adviser under President Ronald Reagan, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under George H.W. Bush and as the nation’s top diplomat under President George W. Bush, didn’t stop there.

“The Republican Party ought to be out there not restricting voting by voter ID, but saying we want everybody to vote,” he told Sawyer and Stephanopoulos. “It’s a party that has to stop saying, ‘We are going to appeal to you with new messages.’  You need policies — the country is becoming more minority.”

Powell, who endorsed President Obama’s reelection bid in October, said that his critiques of the GOP have left some wondering, “Why are you still a Republican?”

Because, Powell said, “I grew up under Ronald Reagan and Cap Weinberger and George Schultz and George Herbert Walker Bush — that’s the Republican party I know — the Howard Bakers of the world, and I think we’ve drifted from that. And I don’t think there’s anything wrong with trying to drift a little bit back. Not because it’s just good to be moderate, but because that’s where the American people are. They lost an election — two.”

But Powell also said President Obama needed to do a better job, during his second, term of reaching out to members of Congress. And as for the president’s second inaugural address, Powell said, “I hope he can, through his own example, restore a sense of civility in the country.”

He said that today was a day for members of both parties, “not to scream and argue with each other, but to come together.”
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« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2013, 01:59:56 pm »


This man I would vote for President.  If he'd have run in 2000 like he was rumored to, I would have voted for him.
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« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2013, 02:19:47 pm »

He was also very good on MSNBC, Cup of Joe this morning. I doubt many diehard Okies are paying much attention other than to express extreme cognitive dissonance. He expects the attacks on him personally which he says is really the problem with the party. Anyone who strays from the base dogma is simply unenlightened.
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« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2013, 07:58:01 pm »

Townsend,
Did you get a job with the DNC?

No.  He has escaped the miasma of Republicontin fumes that have been so pervasive since the hijacking of the party over 20 years ago.

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What you do speaks so loud, I cannot hear what you say.
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