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January 28, 2023, 11:04:28 pm
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Author Topic: Making the Case for Medical Marijuana  (Read 498512 times)
patric
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These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #1095 on: October 20, 2022, 12:24:17 pm »

$10.00 says that it won't be long before some talking head from the US Health alphabet soup states that this is non scientific, unfounded, illegal research on a controlled substance that has no use.

Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler said the public is misinformed about the consequences of legalizing medical and recreational marijuana, and he is seeing this play out in the courtrooms.
He said Oklahoma is already over producing marijuana, 3 thousand growers for 400 thousand licenses, leaving the rest for the black market.


https://www.krmg.com/news/tulsans-voice-their-opinion-about-recreational-marijuana/7J5OZJHAYFHQPHELH4E6R5FHC4/

So is he saying licensed growers are just selling to the mob?  What happened to their Seed-to-sale tracking bureaucracy?  https://oklahoma.gov/omma/businesses/seed-to-sale.html
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"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
patric
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These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #1096 on: November 09, 2022, 11:16:09 am »

How the neighbors did. Missouri gets their act together while Arkansas still doesnt seem to be able to shake the corruption.


Missouri: Amendment 3 (Passed)

Missouri passed legislation decriminalizing cannabis for personal use in 2014, and voters approved a medical marijuana program four years later. Now full legalization was on the ballot in Missouri with Amendment 3 — but after little public resistance for months, the proposal faced criticism right before Election Day from several factions as a coalition of officials and organizations banded together to urge voters to reject the initiative.

Ultimately, though, they failed, and voters approved the amendment.

The group Legal Missouri 2022, which is behind the proposed constitutional amendment, says it was written to provide a “level playing field” for the industry while promoting social equity, Marijuana Moment reported. The initiative was endorsed by advocacy organizations including the ACLU of Missouri and all six chapters of Missouri NORML.

Opposition to the measure included false claims from a conservative PAC that it’s an attempt to insert critical race theory into the constitution by creating a position of “chief equity officer,” and the Missouri Democratic Party alleging that it “may negatively impact minorities, people of color and low-income earning Missourians.”

Amendment 3 makes it legal for adults 21 and older to purchase and possess up to three ounces of non-medical cannabis. It also allows registered home cultivation. Existing medical dispensaries will be licensed to serve adult consumers with a dual license.

Tax revenue from recreational cannabis sales will be used to expunge the records of people convicted of nonviolent cannabis offenses; it will also subsidize veterans’ health care, drug treatment, and state public defender programs.

Regulation will be overseen by the Department of Health and Senior Services, with microbusiness licenses issued through a lottery system. Priority for those licenses will be given to low-income applicants and people disproportionately harmed by the war on drugs.


Arkansas: Issue 4 (Failed)

Arkansas voters approved medical marijuana in 2016. Now they considered legalizing cannabis for adult use with Issue 4, which would have modified the state’s existing medical program.

The Responsible Growth Arkansas campaign turned in over 192,000 signatures in July to qualify for the November ballot. Following an attempt by the state Board of Elections to deny certification to the measure by declaring its wording insufficient, the campaign filed a lawsuit with the Arkansas Supreme Court in August. After weeks of uncertainty, the court ruled in favor of Responsible Growth Arkansas on September 22, clearing the way for the vote.

A September survey by Talk Business and Politics and Hendrix College found that 58.5 percent of Arkansas voters are in favor of the ballot measure, with 29 percent opposed and 13 percent undecided. However, an alliance of progressive cannabis advocates, religious leaders, and pro-Trump politicians — including Republican Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton — was staunchly opposed to legalization. Pro-cannabis critics claim that the measure, which was largely funded by the medical cannabis industry, would have allowed existing medical marijuana businesses to dominate the adult-use market, and reward industry backers of the measure by limiting new competitors.

The proposed law would have allowed adults 21 and over to purchase and possess up to one ounce of cannabis from licensed retailers. It would have repealed residency requirements to qualify for the state’s medical marijuana program. Home cultivation would not be permitted, and it would have abolished criminal background checks for people who own less than 5 percent of a cannabis business.

The amendment would have repealed taxes on medical marijuana while allowing the state to charge a 10 percent sales tax on non-medical sales at dispensaries. Thirty percent of tax revenues would have been divided between law enforcement, university research, and state drug court programs, with the remainder going to the state general fund.


https://www.vox.com/2022/11/7/23445044/results-marijuana-legalization-bill-maryland-missouri
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"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
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