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September 27, 2021, 05:27:58 pm
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Author Topic: Making the Case for Medical Marijuana  (Read 377463 times)
dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #1080 on: June 27, 2021, 01:02:13 pm »

I think this putz Brandon James Roberson, got fingered as a dealer by someone else TPD arrested and was under surveillance. Sounds like he's trying to use "medical marijuana" as a get out of jail card.

I would tend to think this is the reason they got a warrant for his motel room. 
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patric
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« Reply #1081 on: June 27, 2021, 02:21:05 pm »

I think this putz Brandon James Roberson, got fingered as a dealer by someone else TPD arrested and was under surveillance. Sounds like he's trying to use "medical marijuana" as a get out of jail card.

I would tend to think this is the reason they got a warrant for his motel room. 

The rub is them using the presence of marijuana as a pretext with no concern as to its current legal status. 
“Having marijuana in the context of a state that’s legalized it for medical purposes, possession should no longer be construed as an indicator of further criminal activity.”  In the totality of all things, this particular arrest could be justified, but what about the next traffic stop where the patient is a legitimate law-abiding cardholder?
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dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #1082 on: June 27, 2021, 08:06:29 pm »

The rub is them using the presence of marijuana as a pretext with no concern as to its current legal status. 
“Having marijuana in the context of a state that’s legalized it for medical purposes, possession should no longer be construed as an indicator of further criminal activity.”  In the totality of all things, this particular arrest could be justified, but what about the next traffic stop where the patient is a legitimate law-abiding cardholder?

I agree that not checking the legal status (medical use card) is ignoring the law as it is intended. And yes from the article, he didn't want them to search his vehicle so they got a warrant to conduct one. Where I really get ticked is that what constitutes probable cause from a search of the vehicle to then conduct a search of his motel room? Based on an assumption of previous acts/acquaintances/record? It's like stopping someone for a DUI and then saying we need your bank records and the keys to your house to see what else we can find.

Oklahoma just needs to quit with the hand wringing, bible thumping, pocket lining and make the law clear.

PS. I'm still in shock from when I was there in March of 2020 and went to a liquor store and saw cold real beer and cold wine.  Cheesy
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patric
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« Reply #1083 on: July 08, 2021, 04:38:02 pm »

I agree that not checking the legal status (medical use card) is ignoring the law as it is intended. And yes from the article, he didn't want them to search his vehicle so they got a warrant to conduct one. Where I really get ticked is that what constitutes probable cause from a search of the vehicle to then conduct a search of his motel room? Based on an assumption of previous acts/acquaintances/record? It's like stopping someone for a DUI and then saying we need your bank records and the keys to your house to see what else we can find.

Oklahoma just needs to quit with the hand wringing, bible thumping, pocket lining and make the law clear.




Sheriffs seek to grow drug bureaucracy

EDMOND — State officials are working with U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe’s office to secure $4 million in federal dollars to fight illegal marijuana growing operations.

The groups held a press conference Wednesday at the Oklahoma Sheriffs’ Association office in Edmond to discuss the problem and efforts to secure additional dollars.
The funds would be used to set up a special unit within the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control, said Donnie Anderson, the bureau’s director.
“One of the things we have noticed as we have gone around the state this year is there is an increasing concern about illegal grow operations and all the criminal activity associated with it,” said Luke Holland, Inhofe’s chief of staff.
He said it seems to increasingly be the case that Chinese, Mexican, Russian and other organizations are behind the illegal marijuana operations and bring in other illegal activities such as human trafficking, money laundering and weapons trafficking, Holland said.
Inhofe will request the funds through the Department of Justice, Holland said.


https://tulsaworld.com/news/state-and-regional/govt-and-politics/oklahoma-seeks-4-million-from-feds-to-combat-illegal-marijuana-growers/article_2bf6baaa-df51-11eb-862d-8b9799f66399.html






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patric
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« Reply #1084 on: July 26, 2021, 07:35:36 pm »

Despite Congress promising to keep the Feds from busting states with decriminalized cannabis, we have the state bureaucracy acting as  proxy:


Court records show that the Garvin County Sheriff's Office carried out two raids near Pauls Valley in April with Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control investigators.

The criminal counts include marijuana cultivation, possession of a controlled substance without a tax stamp and — most notably — endeavoring to violate the U.S. Controlled Dangerous Substances Act. Cannabis, despite being legal in Oklahoma for medical use, remains classified as a Schedule I substance under federal law.


https://tulsaworld.com/news/state-and-regional/crime-and-courts/attention-on-ghost-owner-investigations-as-criminal-cannabis-case-has-ties-to-tulsa-law-firm/article_ef4a010a-ebe6-11eb-bbbd-7b5c595cb280.html

..and why are anachronisms like "Tax Stamps" even still on the books?
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« Reply #1085 on: August 25, 2021, 10:54:01 am »

We’re not sure what to make of the latest appointment to run the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority but hope it doesn’t reflect any effort to undo the voters’ choice on State Question 788.

Adria Berry is the fourth director of the agency in three years. She was appointed by Health Commissioner Lance Frye, who serves at the pleasure of Gov. Kevin Stitt.

Before Oklahoma voters considered State Question 788, which broadly legalized medical marijuana in the state, Berry publicly spoke against elements of the initiative petition, calling it “problematic for many reasons.”

We had our own qualms before the vote, but the measure passed by a substantial margin, and it’s now state government’s duty to live with the results. To do anything else would be breaking faith with the voters of Oklahoma.

After voters approved SQ 788, Berry supported creating a list of qualifying medical conditions and, through the State Chamber, promoted controversial language about testing for patients who have “safety sensitive” jobs. We don’t think either idea was in the spirit of SQ 788.

Legislators have been probing around the edges of SQ 788 virtually since the day it passed.

We agree with House Majority Floor Leader Jon Echols, R-Oklahoma City, when he says the authority needs to be a standalone agency and not a small part of the State Health Department.

We also agree with Rep. Scott Fetgatter, R-Okmulgee, who said the state cannot use regulations to crush legalized medical marijuana businesses, even if that helps curb illegal marijuana activities.

“It’s anti-business, anti-Republican, and it’s unfair,” Fetgatter said. “There are thousands of people who are trying to make a legitimate business out of this.

“It’s hypocritical of government to say, ‘We’re pro-business, but we don’t like your product, so we’re not pro-your-business.’”

The initiative petition wasn’t well crafted and had some elements that were puzzling, but after it passed, the job of the Legislature and the authority is to live with its stipulations with as few tweaks as are necessary. If that teaches lawmakers to be better tuned to the voters’ desires and faster to anticipate needed changes, then good.


https://tulsaworld.com/opinion/editorial/editorial-sq-788-is-the-law-and-state-government-leaders-have-to-learn-to-live/article_e4ceaf06-041d-11ec-b1cc-536590e14030.html

Legislators have also kept laws in direct conflict with medical marijuana on the books, either accidentally or intentionally facilitating much of the corruption that decriminalization is supposed to ameliorate. For example, science doesnt support the state law that says metabolites in an individuals blood from THC exposure weeks before, is evidence of intoxication (for the purposes of a DUI arrest). Its not like the legislature hasnt had time to correct it.
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"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #1086 on: August 25, 2021, 08:04:25 pm »

We’re not sure what to make of the latest appointment to run the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority but hope it doesn’t reflect any effort to undo the voters’ choice on State Question 788.

Adria Berry is the fourth director of the agency in three years. She was appointed by Health Commissioner Lance Frye, who serves at the pleasure of Gov. Kevin Stitt.

Before Oklahoma voters considered State Question 788, which broadly legalized medical marijuana in the state, Berry publicly spoke against elements of the initiative petition, calling it “problematic for many reasons.”

We had our own qualms before the vote, but the measure passed by a substantial margin, and it’s now state government’s duty to live with the results. To do anything else would be breaking faith with the voters of Oklahoma.

After voters approved SQ 788, Berry supported creating a list of qualifying medical conditions and, through the State Chamber, promoted controversial language about testing for patients who have “safety sensitive” jobs. We don’t think either idea was in the spirit of SQ 788.

Legislators have been probing around the edges of SQ 788 virtually since the day it passed.

We agree with House Majority Floor Leader Jon Echols, R-Oklahoma City, when he says the authority needs to be a standalone agency and not a small part of the State Health Department.

We also agree with Rep. Scott Fetgatter, R-Okmulgee, who said the state cannot use regulations to crush legalized medical marijuana businesses, even if that helps curb illegal marijuana activities.

“It’s anti-business, anti-Republican, and it’s unfair,” Fetgatter said. “There are thousands of people who are trying to make a legitimate business out of this.

“It’s hypocritical of government to say, ‘We’re pro-business, but we don’t like your product, so we’re not pro-your-business.’”

The initiative petition wasn’t well crafted and had some elements that were puzzling, but after it passed, the job of the Legislature and the authority is to live with its stipulations with as few tweaks as are necessary. If that teaches lawmakers to be better tuned to the voters’ desires and faster to anticipate needed changes, then good.


https://tulsaworld.com/opinion/editorial/editorial-sq-788-is-the-law-and-state-government-leaders-have-to-learn-to-live/article_e4ceaf06-041d-11ec-b1cc-536590e14030.html

Legislators have also kept laws in direct conflict with medical marijuana on the books, either accidentally or intentionally facilitating much of the corruption that decriminalization is supposed to ameliorate. For example, science doesnt support the state law that says metabolites in an individuals blood from THC exposure weeks before, is evidence of intoxication (for the purposes of a DUI arrest). Its not like the legislature hasnt had time to correct it.



But they know better than the voters...they are Republicontins!!
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« Reply #1087 on: August 26, 2021, 09:39:52 am »

But they know better than the voters...they are Republicontins!!

Republicans are getting more like Democrats every day, just on different subjects.
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #1088 on: August 26, 2021, 11:15:42 am »

Republicans are getting more like Democrats every day, just on different subjects.


They have always been like that - just convinced people otherwise.

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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I don’t share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
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