A grassroots organization focused on the intelligent and sustainable development, preservation and revitalization of Tulsa.
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
June 18, 2019, 02:59:21 am
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The future of mass transit in Tulsa  (Read 14570 times)
Transport_Oklahoma
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 192



WWW
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2008, 01:09:05 am »

Just found this 55 page report:

http://www.incog.org/transportation/documents/RailTransitStrategicPlanFinal.pdf

Rail Transit Strategic Plan

The Report of the Transportation Strategies Ad Hoc Committee
of the INCOG Transportation Policy Committee
October 2008
Logged
sgrizzle
Kung Fu Treachery
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 16032


Inconceivable!


WWW
« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2008, 01:37:49 pm »

All these requests are for known/shelved projects. The commuter rail plan in Tulsa isn't far enough along to make a formal request.
Logged
Transport_Oklahoma
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 192



WWW
« Reply #32 on: December 14, 2008, 11:50:49 pm »

I wasn't necessarily suggesting a Tulsa commuter rail plan was ready for a January stimulus.

Still it is frustrating that routine road repairs seem to be making up the biggest share of state priorities.

There are countless 1930s WPA projects around Oklahoma that are serving people today.

The new layers of asphalt will just have to be redone a decade from now.
Logged
sgrizzle
Kung Fu Treachery
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 16032


Inconceivable!


WWW
« Reply #33 on: December 15, 2008, 01:33:27 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by Transport_Oklahoma

I wasn't necessarily suggesting a Tulsa commuter rail plan was ready for a January stimulus.

Still it is frustrating that routine road repairs seem to be making up the biggest share of state priorities.

There are countless 1930s WPA projects around Oklahoma that are serving people today.

The new layers of asphalt will just have to be redone a decade from now.



There is a decent likelihood that rail will be prepared for a future similar package that is expected in the coming few years.

Not every WPA project was done the first round.
Logged
Transport_Oklahoma
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 192



WWW
« Reply #34 on: December 15, 2008, 01:54:08 pm »

Albuquerque-Santa Fe commuter rail starts Wednesday (12-17)

Albuquerque Metro pop:  799,260
Tulsa Metro pop:  841,238
OKC Metro pop:  1,157,842
Logged
Red Arrow
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 10340


WWW
« Reply #35 on: December 15, 2008, 10:40:21 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by Transport_Oklahoma

Albuquerque-Santa Fe commuter rail starts Wednesday (12-17)

Albuquerque Metro pop:  799,260
Tulsa Metro pop:  841,238
OKC Metro pop:  1,157,842



The Rail  Runner has proven to be very popular. Popular enough to extend it to Santa Fe.  My sister rides it to work from the park-&_ride at Los Lunas (south of ABQ).  She cites all the normal reasons for using the train.  Less wear and tear on the car, less gasoline, less putting up with idiots on I-25 (think BA Expy).
Logged

 
Transport_Oklahoma
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 192



WWW
« Reply #36 on: December 29, 2008, 05:04:38 pm »

Full trains in Albuquerque.

Logged
Transport_Oklahoma
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 192



WWW
« Reply #37 on: December 29, 2008, 05:21:22 pm »

Next system opens:  Phoenix Metro!

The 20 mile starter light rail line attracted 150,000 over the weekend.

San Antonio, Texas is now the largest city in the nation with bus-only transit.

More.

Logged
TeeDub
Guest
« Reply #38 on: December 30, 2008, 08:18:44 pm »


1.4 billion later...     Holy cow.
Logged
Red Arrow
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 10340


WWW
« Reply #39 on: December 30, 2008, 10:52:12 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by TeeDub


1.4 billion later...     Holy cow.



That's only 70% of the 2 Billion road package that was proposed last summer for Tulsa.
Logged

 
OurTulsa
Guest
« Reply #40 on: December 30, 2008, 11:28:42 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by TeeDub


1.4 billion later...     Holy cow.



1.4b for a 20 mile starter line serving 28 stations expected to carry up to 26,000 riders a day.  

So lets say it more like 70m/mile.  The ridership is what's initially expected however as with most light rail lines it will probably be higher and grow annually.  I wonder how much of the tab was picked up by the feds and the state?  The line is a reinvestment in a predominantly existing urban area where infrastructure exists.  It's a mode that supports urban reinvestment and revitalization as well as compact development at outlying nodes all together establishing a framework for urban living that doesn't require automobility (better for the environment and other commuters continuing to utilize the highway system --- and, oh yeah, it enables some to invest in a lifestyle that uses less oil reducing our reliance on the foriegn stuff)  Sounds like a good investment to me!

I can't remember, how much are we spending on a few miles of expansion of I-44...that will only allow people to get through our city faster (for a while)?

I would gladly support a well designed and situated 20 mile light rail line including 28 development opportunities that connect to downtown...and remember the feds and state would pick up some of that tab...that would redirect investment in our City.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2008, 11:30:54 pm by OurTulsa » Logged
Red Arrow
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 10340


WWW
« Reply #41 on: December 30, 2008, 11:48:49 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by OurTulsa
It's a mode .... that doesn't require automobility (better for the environment and other commuters continuing to utilize the highway system ---



An excellent point worth repeating to those who say they won't be able to ride the rails, what does it do for them.

For those too dense to see the point: If a bunch of other people ride public transit, it will leave the roads and parking lots more open for you.  Around the USA, people are flocking to rail transit in a manner not seen by bus transit.  

See my usual source: www.lightrailnow.org
Logged

 
Transport_Oklahoma
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 192



WWW
« Reply #42 on: January 05, 2009, 05:51:07 pm »

New York Times editorial urging the Obama administration to balance federal transportation priorities.
Logged
Ben Wehr
Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


WWW
« Reply #43 on: February 13, 2009, 06:56:11 am »

I just don't see a need for Rail Way mass transit in the Tulsa metro area. If you're traveling to BA, Bixby, jenks, Sand Springs, Owasso it would be a 15 to 20 min drive. Now, what I think would be beneficial is if there were a quick and efficiant way to get people from down town Tulsa to Bartlesville, Olkmulgee, McCalaster, Muskogee, and other areas where the drive is over 30 min. But from BA to Tulsa and other close communities it's just not practical.
Logged

"The greater service a man will render.
The greater his reward will be." be of service
Composer
Guest
« Reply #44 on: February 13, 2009, 08:39:59 am »

I think those lines to Bartlesville, Muskogee, and etc. will eventually be part of the plan, but we need to develop the BA to Tulsa line before Muskogee to Tulsa.  I think eventually, Broken Arrow will be a stop on the Muskogee to Tulsa line.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
  Hosted by TulsaConnect and Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
 

Mission

 

"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
more...

 

Contact

 

2210 S Main St.
Tulsa, OK 74114
(918) 409-2669
info@tulsanow.org