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July 04, 2020, 07:23:28 pm
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Author Topic: Feds to Collect DNA from everyone arrested  (Read 7181 times)
Friendly Bear
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« on: April 16, 2008, 04:31:58 pm »

The U.S. Department of Injustice has published a proposed rule that would allow any Federal law enforcement agency to collect DNA from anyone arrested.

The Feds arrest approximately 140,000 people per year.

This would presumably include arrests for misdeamenors, or non-violent offenses.

Here's the link:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080416/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/dna_collection

Can anyone spell Big Brother?
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guido911
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2008, 05:49:31 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by Friendly Bear

The U.S. Department of Injustice has published a proposed rule that would allow any Federal law enforcement agency to collect DNA from anyone arrested.

The Feds arrest approximately 140,000 people per year.

This would presumably include arrests for misdeamenors, or non-violent offenses.

Here's the link:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080416/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/dna_collection

Can anyone spell Big Brother?



Nope, no different than law enforcement obtaining fingerprints. Did you read the article?
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Someone get Hoss a pacifier.
patric
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« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2008, 06:44:18 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by guido911

no different than law enforcement obtaining fingerprints.


DNA profiling is as different from fingerprinting as night is from day.  A whole different set of legal and ethical questions apply to cataloging peoples genetic makeup.

If you want to get really creeped out about this, add the 1997 film GATTACA to your Netflix que.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yr1IB9RVE_U
« Last Edit: April 16, 2008, 06:45:38 pm by patric » Logged

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Wilbur
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« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2008, 07:02:16 pm »

No different then fingerprinting, plus, the Feds have so few misdemeanor crimes on the books, it hardly matters.

Yea for the Feds!
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guido911
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« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2008, 09:03:57 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by patric

quote:
Originally posted by guido911

no different than law enforcement obtaining fingerprints.


DNA profiling is as different from fingerprinting as night is from day.  A whole different set of legal and ethical questions apply to cataloging peoples genetic makeup.

If you want to get really creeped out about this, add the 1997 film GATTACA to your Netflix que.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yr1IB9RVE_U



Gattaca was an awesome movie. However, where in the article did it discuss the feds were going to perform DNA profiling or catalogue genetic makeup of persons? I thought the article was merely pointing out that the feds were publishing rules pursuant to federal statute.
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Someone get Hoss a pacifier.
Johnboy976
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« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2008, 10:31:43 pm »

No genetic documentation here. Not even the military pulls that off.
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Friendly Bear
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« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2008, 06:40:31 am »

quote:
Originally posted by Wilbur

No different then fingerprinting, plus, the Feds have so few misdemeanor crimes on the books, it hardly matters.

Yea for the Feds!



Law enforcement loves to enforce laws based on possession of contraband.

In fact, some police have even planted contraband in the form of illegal drugs in order to frame someone they wanted to arrest, or to cover up their unsubstantiated warrant.

Likewise, there are documented incidents of prison authorities planting contraband in prisoners cells, such as liquor, so that they could extend their sentence by revoking "good" time earned.

While DNA has cleared approximately 200 men falsely imprisoned on rape or murder charges, DNA evidence is a two edged sword.

With something as small as a strand of hair from your pocket comb,a discarded piece of chewing gum, or a coffee cup you've imbibed, can provide the evidence to frame you for a crime you did not commit.

The police can say they found your DNA evidence at the crime scene.

Prove you weren't there.

And, there is absolutely nothing you can do about it.



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RecycleMichael
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« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2008, 08:06:12 am »

I am pretty sure the gubmint wants my DNA so they can clone me. Something about a master race...
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bokworker
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« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2008, 08:58:55 am »

RM... now all you have to do is get arrested.
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rwarn17588
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« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2008, 09:11:27 am »

So when do you get off probation, Bear?

[Cheesy]

Methinks he protesteth too much.
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Wilbur
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« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2008, 11:06:04 am »

quote:
Originally posted by Friendly Bear

quote:
Originally posted by Wilbur

No different then fingerprinting, plus, the Feds have so few misdemeanor crimes on the books, it hardly matters.

Yea for the Feds!



Law enforcement loves to enforce laws based on possession of contraband.

In fact, some police have even planted contraband in the form of illegal drugs in order to frame someone they wanted to arrest, or to cover up their unsubstantiated warrant.

Likewise, there are documented incidents of prison authorities planting contraband in prisoners cells, such as liquor, so that they could extend their sentence by revoking "good" time earned.

While DNA has cleared approximately 200 men falsely imprisoned on rape or murder charges, DNA evidence is a two edged sword.

With something as small as a strand of hair from your pocket comb,a discarded piece of chewing gum, or a coffee cup you've imbibed, can provide the evidence to frame you for a crime you did not commit.

The police can say they found your DNA evidence at the crime scene.

Prove you weren't there.

And, there is absolutely nothing you can do about it.






You actually believe....... Oh, never mind.  Not worth it.
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Friendly Bear
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« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2008, 11:40:36 am »

quote:
Originally posted by Wilbur

quote:
Originally posted by Friendly Bear

quote:
Originally posted by Wilbur

No different then fingerprinting, plus, the Feds have so few misdemeanor crimes on the books, it hardly matters.

Yea for the Feds!



Law enforcement loves to enforce laws based on possession of contraband.

In fact, some police have even planted contraband in the form of illegal drugs in order to frame someone they wanted to arrest, or to cover up their unsubstantiated warrant.

Likewise, there are documented incidents of prison authorities planting contraband in prisoners cells, such as liquor, so that they could extend their sentence by revoking "good" time earned.

While DNA has cleared approximately 200 men falsely imprisoned on rape or murder charges, DNA evidence is a two edged sword.

With something as small as a strand of hair from your pocket comb,a discarded piece of chewing gum, or a coffee cup you've imbibed, can provide the evidence to frame you for a crime you did not commit.

The police can say they found your DNA evidence at the crime scene.

Prove you weren't there.

And, there is absolutely nothing you can do about it.






You actually believe....... Oh, never mind.  Not worth it.



An enlightening book that tells a small part of the story of the effects on innocent people of bad policing and bad prosecutions, including intentional framing of suspects in order to get a conviction, is documented in the book:

Actual Innocence by Barry Schreck et al

Another recent best seller about Oklahoma INJUSTICE, by the notable author John Grisham is The Innocent Man.

Then, move on to Mark Furman's Death & Justice:  An Expose on Oklahoma's Death Row.

I doubt if Mr. Grisham, Mr. Schreck, or Mr. Furman will ever be invited to Oklahoma by the ruling power establishment.  

Schreck won a multi-million dollar settlement against the city of Ada, Pontotoc County, and the State of Oklahoma on behalf of his clients after their 12 year wrongful imprisonment.

Mistakes which cost the TAXPAYERS money.

And, County D.A.'s Macy and Peterson got to retire.  Without ANY consequences for their actions.



« Last Edit: April 17, 2008, 12:13:46 pm by Friendly Bear » Logged
bokworker
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« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2008, 12:57:11 pm »

Based on the above observation FB... why would you not want to see an expansion of a program that can help alleviate the risk of such unwarranted incarcerations.... and the attendant risk to us taxpayers?

Our legal sytem is built around the concept of it being better to free a guilty man than imprison an innocent man... is it successful at all times? Of course not. But there are many more guilty persons walking the streets today then innocent men behind bars.
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rwarn17588
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« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2008, 01:11:41 pm »

^+1

Using F.B.'s logic, police officers in the 19th century wouldn't have been allowed to use fingerprints as evidence in crime scenes because there *might* be a slim chance of planting evidence. You don't suppress a really innovative method that can do a lot of good just because you have a handful of ne'er-do-wells that might abuse it.

That's just dumb reasoning (I'm starting to see a pattern with F.B.).

Listen ... DNA is just another tool in the toolbox that may help police officers solve crimes. If you got a bad cop who wants to plant evidence, he's going to do with DNA, fingerprints, anything he can get his hands on.

The irony is ... that same DNA can exonerate suspects who may have been improperly linked to a crime. It's certainly happened before, especially to nearly a dozen death-row inmates in Illinois.
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Wilbur
Guest
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2008, 02:29:09 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by Friendly Bear

quote:
Originally posted by Wilbur

quote:
Originally posted by Friendly Bear

quote:
Originally posted by Wilbur

No different then fingerprinting, plus, the Feds have so few misdemeanor crimes on the books, it hardly matters.

Yea for the Feds!



Law enforcement loves to enforce laws based on possession of contraband.

In fact, some police have even planted contraband in the form of illegal drugs in order to frame someone they wanted to arrest, or to cover up their unsubstantiated warrant.

Likewise, there are documented incidents of prison authorities planting contraband in prisoners cells, such as liquor, so that they could extend their sentence by revoking "good" time earned.

While DNA has cleared approximately 200 men falsely imprisoned on rape or murder charges, DNA evidence is a two edged sword.

With something as small as a strand of hair from your pocket comb,a discarded piece of chewing gum, or a coffee cup you've imbibed, can provide the evidence to frame you for a crime you did not commit.

The police can say they found your DNA evidence at the crime scene.

Prove you weren't there.

And, there is absolutely nothing you can do about it.






You actually believe....... Oh, never mind.  Not worth it.



An enlightening book that tells a small part of the story of the effects on innocent people of bad policing and bad prosecutions, including intentional framing of suspects in order to get a conviction, is documented in the book:

Actual Innocence by Barry Schreck et al

Another recent best seller about Oklahoma INJUSTICE, by the notable author John Grisham is The Innocent Man.

Then, move on to Mark Furman's Death & Justice:  An Expose on Oklahoma's Death Row.

I doubt if Mr. Grisham, Mr. Schreck, or Mr. Furman will ever be invited to Oklahoma by the ruling power establishment.  

Schreck won a multi-million dollar settlement against the city of Ada, Pontotoc County, and the State of Oklahoma on behalf of his clients after their 12 year wrongful imprisonment.

Mistakes which cost the TAXPAYERS money.

And, County D.A.'s Macy and Peterson got to retire.  Without ANY consequences for their actions.






'Mistake', in your own words, is a far cry from planting and framing.

Ooops!  I got involved again.
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