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November 17, 2017, 06:55:48 pm
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Author Topic: Surveillance Cameras To Scan License Plates  (Read 21866 times)
patric
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« Reply #120 on: May 15, 2015, 10:50:28 am »

I have to say that I have had an experience on the Golden Gate Bridge where a license plate camera was a help. Going across the bridge there is a toll charge for going south across the bridge into SF, no charge going north into Marin Co. To alleviate traffic snarls on the bridge, there are no toll attendants going south. (otherwise it would back up to Santa Rosa) They have an account that you can set up that is attached to your plate number for billing.

Its not the toll-collection cameras that are the problem, but bulk spying by agencies or rogue officials (who have occasionally targeted individuals or groups for blackmail).


Even the FBI Had Privacy Concerns on License Plate Readers

Law enforcement’s use of automated license plate readers has drawn increasing controversy in recent years amid concerns that the devices pose a threat to privacy. Now, internal documents show that the FBI, based on a recommendation from its own lawyers, was told to stop buying the devices for a time in 2012.

The documents, obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union through a public records request, show the FBI’s own Office of General Counsel was grappling with concerns about the agency’s use of the technology and the apparent lack of a cohesive government policy to protect the civil liberties of citizens whose vehicles are photographed by the readers. That apparently prompted an order from the OGC to temporarily put the brakes on further purchases.

It’s not known when the FBI resumed purchasing the devices, but the revelations show that even within the FBI there are those who have questioned the privacy implications of a technology widely seen by some as invasive.

Civil liberties groups argue that the readers, widely used not only by the FBI but by local police departments around the country, and the databases that store the license plate images pose a fundamental risk to privacy because in the aggregate they can reveal sensitive information about a person’s travels and activities. Critics of the technology also say the readers capture more than just license plate numbers. A California man who filed a public records request to receive copies of images collected by his local law enforcement agency obtained more than 100 images of his vehicle in various locations, including one that showed him and his daughters exiting their car while it was parked in their driveway.

“Automatic license plate readers are a sophisticated way of tracking drivers’ locations, and when their data is aggregated over time they can paint detailed pictures of people’s lives,” notes Bennett Stein of the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Project in a blog post published today about the documents.

Little is known about the government’s use of automated license plate readers or how long it has been deploying the technology. The documents obtained by the ACLU show that the FBI was testing automated license plate readers in 2007 but seem to indicate the agency started using the tech earlier than this.

A Virginia man recently sued the Fairfax County Police Department in his state for unnecessarily collecting and retaining images of his license plate. The man was not a suspect in a criminal investigation and asserts the database violates a state law prohibiting government agencies from unnecessarily collecting, storing, or disseminating the personal information of individuals.



http://www.wired.com/2015/05/even-fbi-privacy-concerns-license-plate-readers/
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patric
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« Reply #121 on: July 27, 2015, 10:46:16 am »

Saw a guy in a red or maroon dually pickup truck with license plate scanners on his hood driving around Sunday night near Memorial.
Had an insidious looking car-stealing rig on his back bumper.
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dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #122 on: July 27, 2015, 11:53:40 am »

Saw a guy in a red or maroon dually pickup truck with license plate scanners on his hood driving around Sunday night near Memorial.
Had an insidious looking car-stealing rig on his back bumper.

That be the repo man that works for all of those pay as you go use car lots.
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patric
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« Reply #123 on: August 30, 2015, 08:54:16 am »


Absolute vindication of using warrant-less mass-surveillance to automate another tedious police chore, because they never could have found the vehicle and suspect just by the detailed descriptions and normal good police work.

or as CF put it on another thread


Stop and search every vehicle...
Or to put it another way, 95+% of warrant-less government searches resulted in a failure to find what they purportedly were looking for - but we are all safer, right comrades?


Could save us money, though.  Dont need to hire more patrolmen when we can have robots at every intersection.  Cool



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"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
Ed W
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« Reply #124 on: November 29, 2015, 08:20:11 pm »

And then there's this...using mass surveillance to round up the guilty along with the innocent:

https://medium.com/@nselby/los-angeles-just-proposed-the-worst-use-of-license-plate-reader-data-in-history-702c35733b50#.y88mudhjs
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Ed

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« Reply #125 on: November 30, 2015, 08:39:17 am »

Wow. Can you imagine being a business owner in the Pearl District early on if it was on a government list for prostitution and your customers received a letter for traveling to your establishment? A new employee at your factory? You name it, it looks bad.

I read a book like that once...
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patric
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« Reply #126 on: November 30, 2015, 11:12:08 am »

Wow. Can you imagine being a business owner in the Pearl District early on if it was on a government list for prostitution and your customers received a letter for traveling to your establishment? A new employee at your factory? You name it, it looks bad.

I read a book like that once...

That book used to be required reading to keep whats happening from happening.

The detective's article is really well done, as well. Whatever happened to that type of policeman?
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patric
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« Reply #127 on: April 18, 2016, 10:18:24 pm »

Oklahoma House approves bill that would allow automated license plate readers

Senate Bill 359 would allow law enforcement officials to compare a license plate number with an Oklahoma Insurance Department list to determine if the owner of a plate has insurance.

“With the passage of this legislation, we are one step closer to addressing the uninsured motorist problem in Oklahoma,” said Rep. Ken Walker, R-Tulsa. “Uninsured motorists drive up the cost of car insurance and often drive away from the scene of collisions, leaving the other party to foot the bill. With this, we can help law enforcement spot uninsured motorists and give them an opportunity to come into compliance before they face larger consequences.”

The bill comes with privacy concerns for some, including Walker. The legislation requires that license plate photographs for insured vehicles must be destroyed.

A second proposal, Senate Bill 1144, would create the Automatic License Plate Reader Privacy Act, which would make the misuse of data subject to legal action.

Senate Bill 359 was approved by a vote of 52-38.




Here we go again.  The same "uninsured motorist" pretext, the same promises of "we wont abuse it."

Why does it seem mass-surveillance is the answer to so many problems?
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patric
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« Reply #128 on: November 15, 2017, 10:36:09 pm »



District Attorneys Approve License Plate Scanner Contract, Bringing Uninsured Drivers Closer to Automatic Tickets

http://oklahomawatch.org/2017/11/15/district-attorneys-approve-license-plate-scanner-contract-bringing-uninsured-drivers-closer-to-automatic-tickets/

Oklahoma finalized a deal this week with a company to use license-plate scanners to catch uninsured drivers, and the firm expects to issue an eventual 20,000 citations a month starting as early as next year.

The program, believed to be the first of its kind in the nation, involves setting up automated scanners on highways around the state to detect uninsured vehicles and mailing their owners a citation with a fine of $184, according to the District Attorneys Council.

Gatso USA, a Beverly, Massachusetts-based company that specializes in red-light-running and speeding detection systems, will initially get $80, or 43 percent, of each fine.

It will be overseen by the District Attorneys Council rather than law enforcement, and the state’s 27 district attorneys’ offices are expected to receive millions of dollars in citation revenue a year.


People have been blackmailed, lost their jobs and gone to prison for abusing this technology, but isnt having your daily travels cataloged a small price to pay for catching uninsured drivers?  We'll worry about oversight later.
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"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
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