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November 20, 2017, 03:34:23 am
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Author Topic: 11TH ST DEVELOPMENT  (Read 6469 times)
Conan71
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« Reply #30 on: April 30, 2016, 03:12:03 pm »

Does 11th really need bike lanes?  Honest question.  I would rather see dedicated lanes for BRT and then have protected east-west bike lanes on 13th (figuring out how to bridge the gap at Lewis) and especially 6th.  Enhance the existing bike route on 3rd.  Connect them all north-south at Utica, Delaware and Pittsburg.

We rode this west-bound on our trip to the Cherry St. farmer’s market this morning.  In addition to the cones, they did put out signage in an attempt to make motorists more cyclist aware like yielding their right turn to cyclists in the cycling lane.

All-in-all, I applaud what TyPros have done with this and they had a really good presence on the NW corner of 11th & Lewis.

I’m not a huge fan of “protected” bike lanes as I think they give less experienced cyclists a false sense of security, especially when you have cross streets every 1/10 of a mile. 

I didn’t see any dumbass moves while we were on 11th, but did have a couple of drivers decide it was perfectly legal to pull left of us at stop signs today, instead of waiting their turn behind and another dickweed who saw fit to pass all four of us in the blind S curve off the NE corner of the old Eisenhower school.

There is a general disregard for traffic laws by motorists AND cyclists which keep protected bike lanes from being the "safe" zone they are purported to be.

As far as dedicated lanes on 13th, 6th, & 3rd/4th- entirely unnecessary, those are really wide roads with limited traffic.
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"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
LandArchPoke
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« Reply #31 on: April 30, 2016, 07:27:58 pm »

I'm not sure there is Right of Way for both BRT and bike lanes on 11th. Unless they plan to run busses mixed with traffic? Which kind of isn't BRT... I kind of thought that was the point of the 11th Street route was for it to have its own lanes? Maybe I am wrong in that assumption.

A lot of the traffic issues this weekend really were just because there weren't left turn lanes at some of the lights. A road diet on 11th would work just fine and not have a huge traffic impact as long as a few left turn lanes were added in certain spots. Frankly, like I had said before, I wish we could extended this pilot project for a few months with some paint. Turn the right lanes into street parking and add bike lanes. This entire corridor would feel dramatically different. Same way the Cherry Street did when the parking was changed.
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« Reply #32 on: April 30, 2016, 07:42:52 pm »

I'm not sure there is Right of Way for both BRT and bike lanes on 11th. Unless they plan to run busses mixed with traffic? Which kind of isn't BRT... I kind of thought that was the point of the 11th Street route was for it to have its own lanes? Maybe I am wrong in that assumption.

A lot of the traffic issues this weekend really were just because there weren't left turn lanes at some of the lights. A road diet on 11th would work just fine and not have a huge traffic impact as long as a few left turn lanes were added in certain spots. Frankly, like I had said before, I wish we could extended this pilot project for a few months with some paint. Turn the right lanes into street parking and add bike lanes. This entire corridor would feel dramatically different. Same way the Cherry Street did when the parking was changed.

It's not true BRT without dedicated traffic lanes.  Is that really what it is or watered-down "BRT" which is really just "enhanced bus". 

11th should have true BRT.  Peoria could get away with just enhanced bus IMO though BRT on both would be awesome.
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davideinstein
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« Reply #33 on: May 01, 2016, 11:57:17 am »

Well, we voted to fund full blown BRT so that better happen.
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LandArchPoke
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« Reply #34 on: May 01, 2016, 12:59:11 pm »

I know Peoria is going to be modified BRT due to right of way issues. There's no way to accommodate both Bike Lanes and lane dedicated BRT along 11th, so it's kind of one or the other. I want to see lane dedicated BRT on 11th, and not modified BRT. If it is, then there better be road diets done with on street parking and bike lanes up and down 11th.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #35 on: May 02, 2016, 12:04:40 pm »

This was a neat event! Quite a few groups and lot of people worked hard on this. It was neat to see some of the existing, in-process and upcoming developments:

* Fuel 66 Food Truck Park (Had plans on display - Park will utilize existing structure to create bar with enclosable covered patio and 6 spots for food trucks). Plan is to be open year-round.

* Renaissance Brewery (Will be ~7,000 ft2 including a couple apartments, taproom with food service and events center)

* Kathy Taylor's foundation set-up a pop-up Route-66 museum at 11th & Lewis promoting the permanent museum to be built on Riverside

* Kathy Taylor's foundation purchased the lots across the street (including the former Tulsa Gamma Ray) and have demolished them with plans to build some sort of more urban development.

* A lot of buildings are being redone from Peoria to Rockford. That stretch up to St Louis is starting to look pretty sharp. Could this potentially become sort of a 2nd Cherry St?

* Kitchen 66 has some tasty food startups and will soon have a walk-up market downtown.

* 11th st felt very lively with bicyclers, trolleys, city buses and a steady amount of visitors going from one stop to another. It was a sneak peak of what 11th might be like if it were more urban with a better concentration of places.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #36 on: May 02, 2016, 12:13:44 pm »

Perhaps they could match what they've done on Cherry St (Diagonal parking/2-lane) on 11th from Peoria to St Louis. That strip has real potential to be a neat little urban area. The other/main part of the Pearl District is 2-lane with street parking. It at least should traffic down enough to notice the more pedestrian-friendly places and could make bicycling there feel better.

Although, bicycling down Cherry St is kind of nerve wracking as cars try to pass you and cars pulling out can't see you.
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CharlieSheen
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« Reply #37 on: May 02, 2016, 12:46:28 pm »

Speaking of 11th st development:

Fuel 66 food truck park planned on Route 66http://www.tulsaworld.com/scene/food/fuel-food-truck-park-planned-on-route/article_34ee51b4-a18f-53c3-a37a-a0d7231bee73.html

This place was opened for a couple TU football games last year. It was nice and I hope it stays up and going. Although it does have nearby competition with the Park in the Pearl. Hopefully this helps both places become more popular lunch and dinner hubs.

I hope the Park in the Pearl makes it too.  Fuel 66 is going to get all the media attention. I feel like they will have different clientele though.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2016, 01:04:33 pm by CharlieSheen » Logged
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #38 on: May 02, 2016, 01:12:55 pm »

I hope the Park in the Pearl makes it too.  Fuel 66 is going to get all the media attention.

I hope so too! Seems to have great crowds some days and then empty on others. The view of downtown from there is really nice.

Someone asked them about the Park in the Pearl. The odd/inconsistent hours, no permanent bathrooms and seasonal operation (it STILL isn't open), makes the Fuel 66 concept doable even though they're only a couple miles away.

Has anyone been to the Truck Yard in Dallas? They only have 3 food trucks there yet they are consistently busy and packed on weekends. What sets them apart? The atmosphere which feels very authentic like an Americana movie set from some 80's movie about a kids hideout tree-house in a junk yard. It is a classic patio with a distinguished comfortable atmosphere. It has an indoor bar with good local/craft brews, big garage doors so it's like being outside and a massive patio around it (Dogs were allowed). They also have a built-in food place with excellent philly steaks. Perhaps you need a permanent bar/restaurant pressense to go along with the  food trucks which aren't quite as reliable.

It seems like it is less about having tons of food trucks and more about making a neat atmosphere and having a few really good food options. Ultimately people want to hang out outside and have a beer and food without the formality of going to a restaurant.
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CharlieSheen
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« Reply #39 on: May 02, 2016, 01:21:51 pm »

7 million people vs 1 million people sets them apart a lot.
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Conan71
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« Reply #40 on: May 02, 2016, 03:16:44 pm »

One possible issue with narrowing use of 11th is there is a major hospital in that corridor, there would have to be reliable re-routing for ambulances to get to the ER at Hillcrest if they are coming east or west on 11th with a critical patient
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« Reply #41 on: May 03, 2016, 08:23:54 am »

7 million people vs 1 million people sets them apart a lot.

With 7 million people comes tremendous amount of competition and very high real estate. There are tons of cool looking places with extravagant patios in Dallas which are empty most of the time (even several highly rated places nearby always had a tiny fraction of the crowd). The Truck Yard is nicely placed in one of the more urban districts (similar to Cherry St). It is a completely unique place and would be a big draw in any city in the region.
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Conan71
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« Reply #42 on: May 03, 2016, 09:37:05 am »

Speaking of food trucks, I’d love to see the event in K-W Square at 1st & Lewis more than once a year.  The public parking lot is perfect for it.  I’d be grateful for even once a month.
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« Reply #43 on: July 26, 2017, 03:57:47 pm »

Quote
Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation announces plans for $5.5 million Mother Road Market

Start with a sliver of historic Route 66, add dashes of homegrown edibles and entrepreneurship, and one has the ingredients for the Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation's newest venture.

Celebrating its 20th anniversary as a nonprofit, LTFF announced plans Wednesday to develop the $5.5 million Mother Road Market at its headquarters at 1124 S. Lewis Ave. Billed as a vibrant community space, it will feature 26,000 square feet and 17 curated shops designed to bridge the next step for graduates of Kitchen 66, a food incubator founded by LTFF.

Local pizzeria Andolini's will be anchor tenant of the Market, which will be a renovation of the 1939 Scrivner-Stevens Grocery building.

"These food hall and public markets are popping up all over the United States," LTFF CEO Elizabeth Ellison said in an interview earlier this week.

"We are really unique because we are a nonprofit that is operating it. It gives us the added ability to infuse community programming and business assistance into the market.

"I love the idea of educating the community about our food system — not just how food is grown but why it matters that restaurant A uses farm B to supply their food, and here's why it's better for our entire community if we try to do that. And by the way, let's talk about why it's important to eat fruits and vegetables and how to prepare them a way that's cost-effective and healthier for you and your family."

Officials made the announcement at a news conference Wednesday at Fuel 66, a nearby food truck court on 11th Street.

Sixteen rentable shops at Mother Road Market will be 320 square feet each, with another space about 640 square feet. Also, Kitchen 66 will carve out 3,440 square feet in the new facility for its commercial kitchen, as well as for a general store and demonstration kitchen.

"To me, the Market is just the logical next step for supporting those food entrepreneurs and really showcasing what they have to offer," Ellison said. "Oklahoma is known as an agricultural state … but we also have this value add of bringing these amazing food businesses who are using these local ingredients and getting to know our farmers and then making this incredible food. Everybody wins.

"We're just trying to minimize the risk of starting a brick-and-mortar business. In our view, the Kitchen 66 graduates would take the shorter-term leases in the shops and then either move to a permanent location or decide that they are going to open a food truck or open a bigger, brick-and-mortar business."

Other amenities of the Market will include a bar, a 640-square-foot space to house restaurant pop-ups, an indoor-outdoor seating area and children's activities.

Selser Schaefer Architects is designing Mother Road Market, and Fox + Allen Realty will handle the leasing. The project is expected to be completed by late spring 2018.


http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/smallbusiness/lobeck-taylor-family-foundation-announces-plans-for-million-mother-road/article_4e06e93e-06dd-5707-b6de-29425616e4b7.html
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swake
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« Reply #44 on: July 26, 2017, 05:53:55 pm »

this sounds great, but is it meant to be more a farmer's market kind of space or touristy/restaurant space?
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