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November 24, 2017, 10:59:09 am
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Author Topic: Snout Houses  (Read 3537 times)
AngieB
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« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2015, 01:17:23 pm »

I'm glad I don't live in a snout house or I'd be feeling pretty beat up about now. Man. Criticizing the type of home in which people live.  Undecided
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Townsend
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« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2015, 01:42:21 pm »

I'm glad I don't live in a snout house or I'd be feeling pretty beat up about now. Man. Criticizing the type of home in which people live.  Undecided

They know what they've done.
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sgrizzle
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Inconceivable!


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« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2015, 03:36:30 pm »

At least us snouts don't live in those flat-roof monstrosities. Smiley
« Last Edit: May 09, 2015, 09:36:38 pm by sgrizzle » Logged
heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #18 on: May 09, 2015, 06:56:30 am »

I'm glad I don't live in a snout house or I'd be feeling pretty beat up about now. Man. Criticizing the type of home in which people live.  Undecided


I have a pug-nosed snout house.  The next one will have detached garage in back and the equivalent of an alley for access.  And gravel drive!!

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“When you wage war on the public schools, you're attacking the mortar that holds the community together. You're not a conservative, you're a vandal.”    - Garrison Keillor

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« Reply #19 on: May 09, 2015, 07:57:05 am »

I'm glad I don't live in a snout house or I'd be feeling pretty beat up about now. Man. Criticizing the type of home in which people live.  Undecided

It really does make a difference on how a neighborhood feels, how it "lives".  May seem like a small thing, but it really does impact the sense of community in a negative way.  If people don't care about others and their community like that, well, it's like if I walked up to you and slapped you then you reached up to slap me and I then said "Hey, it's wrong to hit people!".  If someone does something crappy to others, it shouldn't be such a leap of imagination to think those others, might then have at least some justification in being negatively critical about it.

But to be fair, I just don't think a lot of people realize or have even thought about snout houses and how they can change the dynamic of a neighborhood thats full of them versus how a neighborhood looks and feels and "lives" when the front doors and front porches are, well, to the front. Much more neighborly and more easily active with people out on those porches and neighbors seeing others on their porches, seeing neighbors in their yards (can't if the garage is blocking everyones view of everyone else).  I remember walking through Brady Heights a while back and seeing so many people out on their porches, created a different vibe.  Heck we even stopped and chatted with a few.  Feels more comfortable walking through those neighborhoods than the ones that are all snout houses.  Completely different.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2015, 08:04:02 am by TheArtist » Logged

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AngieB
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« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2015, 08:09:58 am »

It really does make a difference on how a neighborhood feels, how it "lives".  May seem like a small thing, but it really does impact the sense of community in a negative way.  If people don't care about others and their community like that, well, it's like if I walked up to you and slapped you then you reached up to slap me and I then said "Hey, it's wrong to hit people!".  If someone does something crappy to others, it shouldn't be such a leap of imagination to think those others, might then have at least some justification in being negatively critical about it.

But to be fair, I just don't think a lot of people realize or have even thought about snout houses and how they can change the dynamic of a neighborhood thats full of them versus how a neighborhood looks and feels and "lives" when the front doors and front porches are, well, to the front. Much more neighborly and more easily active with people out on those porches and neighbors seeing others on their porches, seeing neighbors in their yards (can't if the garage is blocking everyones view of everyone else).  I remember walking through Brady Heights a while back and seeing so many people out on their porches, created a different vibe.  Heck we even stopped and chatted with a few.  Feels more comfortable walking through those neighborhoods than the ones that are all snout houses.  Completely different.

That is no excuse for making fun of the type of home in which I'm sure many on this forum probably live. It is the utmost in snobbery. I don't live in a snout house, but would you care to see my piece of crap detached garage? It's 80 years old and feeling it.
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2015, 08:25:29 am »

That is no excuse for making fun of the type of home in which I'm sure many on this forum probably live. It is the utmost in snobbery. I don't live in a snout house, but would you care to see my piece of crap detached garage? It's 80 years old and feeling it.


That's what I am building.  You can do some simple reinforcement/stabilization with some plywood and a few nails/screws.  You can do this....
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“When you wage war on the public schools, you're attacking the mortar that holds the community together. You're not a conservative, you're a vandal.”    - Garrison Keillor

Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without.

What you do speaks so loud, I cannot hear what you say.
AngieB
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« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2015, 08:36:58 am »


That's what I am building.  You can do some simple reinforcement/stabilization with some plywood and a few nails/screws.  You can do this....


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AquaMan
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« Reply #23 on: May 09, 2015, 09:27:11 am »


That's what I am building.  You can do some simple reinforcement/stabilization with some plywood and a few nails/screws.  You can do this....


Sad to say many homes in my hood have given up on their garages and tore them down without replacing them. They overestimated the work and skills required to save them and in so doing it cost them more in lost home value. Mine had some termite damage on one side (sill plate), needed some bracing and updated electrical but it had a good stem wall. I did it all myself and found what I needed at Home Depot.

Now, that damn front porch floor....
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onward...through the fog
heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #24 on: May 10, 2015, 09:03:16 pm »

Treated lumber - ground contact grade - for sills is your friend!!  Use appropriate fasteners for treated lumber - usually stainless steel.  

Google is your friend!!

But it is NOT a "watch one and done" - you might be watching the village idiot who does it all wrong - there are many of those out there.  Shoot...we have some here!!  If it doesn't look like you can do this with a few simple tools, then they are doing it wrong.  We are talking hammer, saw, level, some nails/screws.  A drill is great for installing screws.  A "sawzall" is a great tool that can really help speed things up, and I think they can be rented reasonably at Lowe's and Home Depot.  Or do like I do and use the 'project' as your rationalization for buying a new tool.  If it would cost me $1,000 plus $200 parts to have someone do the job, then anything I spend on tools under that $1,000 means I get them for free!!!

Plywood is good for bracing.  Can use nails, but I like screws for just about everything.  NOT deck screws!!  NOT wood screws!!  Use ONLY sheet metal screws - plywood to wall stud for bracing - a number 10 screw is good.  There are places that tell you how to determine length - some of those videos.  My rule of thumb is for every one unit thickness of the thing I am bolting to something else, use twice as much length for the part it is anchoring into - 3 times the first thickness.  Example - 3/4" plywood - use 3/4 X 3, or at least 2 1/4" long sheet metal screw.  Longer won't hurt, up to 3".   Use pan head, flat head - ALWAYS Phillips head....NEVER slotted !!!   Pre-drill smaller holes than the screw size for old wood - it is hard!!

1/4" plywood to wall - at least 3/4" screw, and 1" is better.

Nails - anything involving 2 X 4 wall stud lumber - 16 penny nails only.

Watch home improvement shows.  Google.  Read books.




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“When you wage war on the public schools, you're attacking the mortar that holds the community together. You're not a conservative, you're a vandal.”    - Garrison Keillor

Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without.

What you do speaks so loud, I cannot hear what you say.
heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #25 on: May 10, 2015, 09:05:26 pm »

Sad to say many homes in my hood have given up on their garages and tore them down without replacing them. They overestimated the work and skills required to save them and in so doing it cost them more in lost home value. Mine had some termite damage on one side (sill plate), needed some bracing and updated electrical but it had a good stem wall. I did it all myself and found what I needed at Home Depot.

Now, that damn front porch floor....


Easy, peasy....  Some good teak 1 X 4"  or  1 X 6" and you are good to go....

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“When you wage war on the public schools, you're attacking the mortar that holds the community together. You're not a conservative, you're a vandal.”    - Garrison Keillor

Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without.

What you do speaks so loud, I cannot hear what you say.
rebound
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« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2015, 11:10:21 am »

Going back to the snout house topic...

it's not just "snout houses" that kill a neighborhood vibe.  It's basically any house with little/no front porch and/or a usable front porch that is not immediately facing the street, with a good view.  You CAN build a front-facing garage and still have a usable front porch, but for whatever reason a usable front porch (as a place to sit and hang out and watch the street, etc..) is just not something that is normally done anymore.  When I built my home in Owasso 10 years ago, I was adamant that it would have a large, usable front porch.  It took quite a while to find a builder with a plan that was already fairly close so that I didn't have to go full-custom.  I ended up with a porch that was about thirty feet wide, with a big swing and plenty of room to park bikes, etc.  We used it all the time, and people would stop and chat or at least wave as they drove by. 

TL/DR:  It's not the snout, but the lack of a usable porch, that kills neighborhoods.
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