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April 25, 2019, 02:55:26 am
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Author Topic: kendall whittier/lweis/6th/demolition  (Read 19936 times)
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #90 on: March 27, 2019, 12:27:31 pm »


Tulsa Development Authority has had the legal authority to acquire blighted properties and exercise eminent domain since 1959. The organization has used that power in the Kendall Whittier neighborhood and other parts of town, including north Tulsa, where it purchased properties to clear the way for an Albertson’s grocery store at the corner of Pine and Peoria avenues.

But when the Greenwood/Unity Heritage Neighborhoods Sector Plan and the updated Kendall Whittier Sector Plan were approved in 2016, they did not include the statutory language required for TDA to exercise its full powers to implement urban renewal programs.

“The consultants that we hired, they were out of Chicago, and I think that was a new tool for them; and as a result, it wasn’t incorporated in the overall document,” Walker said. “We consider this a lesson learned.”


https://www.tulsaworld.com/news/local/government-and-politics/proposed-north-tulsa-redevelopment-plan-includes-eminent-domain-authority-city/article_b4b958f3-b38d-5bce-891f-6189cb63d109.html



It's 2019 and the term "urban renewal" still being championed like it's some sort of catch phrase which excuses all the demolishing they do.

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City Councilor Vanessa Hall-Harper, whose district would be affected by the plan, said she is concerned because some of her constituents do not trust TDA.

“Obviously, my community is very leery of urban renewal,” she said. “The average

Any wonder why? Greenwood was practically wiped out for the highway and "urban renewal" of the 60s. Complete disregard for all of those historical buildings, the community or the people who lived there.

The TDA is the merciless arm of the CoT which can be granted the authority of government without the accountability to the people. Let the TDA do the dirty work so that the CoT doesn't have to face any backlash.
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« Reply #91 on: March 27, 2019, 12:58:03 pm »

Well, looks like those areas west of Quincy Avenue are in a opportunity zone also, the Tulsa World just had their map made up inaccurately:

https://www.cityoftulsa.org/economic-development/opportunities-and-incentives/opportunity-zones/

The more surprising/bold move is that the north side of Cherry Street is included! Of all places, it seems like one which has been very successful with new developments and a good track record of upscaling zoning and building high-quality dense development and the entire section from  BA to 15th, from Lewis to Peoria has virtually no empty lots or vacancies.

The notable exception being 14th & Utica which the Bumgarner’s own.  They have been “planning” an office project there for 15 years..
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« Reply #92 on: March 27, 2019, 09:45:12 pm »

It's 2019 and the term "urban renewal" still being championed like it's some sort of catch phrase which excuses all the demolishing they do.

Any wonder why? Greenwood was practically wiped out for the highway and "urban renewal" of the 60s. Complete disregard for all of those historical buildings, the community or the people who lived there.

The TDA is the merciless arm of the CoT which can be granted the authority of government without the accountability to the people. Let the TDA do the dirty work so that the CoT doesn't have to face any backlash.




The City Council on Wednesday heard from dozens of Tulsans who are vehemently opposed to two development plans proposed by the Tulsa Development Authority. It was Councilor Ben Kimbro, however, who best summed up the emotions of the hundreds of people who attended the meeting.

“I am profoundly disappointed in this calamity caused at the hands of TDA,” Kimbro said.

Then, in his inimitable style, he added: “In fact, if I ever needed guidance on p---- — off a bunch of people, you all would be the first people I would call.”


https://www.tulsaworld.com/news/local/eminent-domain-city-council-hears-from-tulsans-irate-over-north/article_d37c9b12-0de6-5d68-9b58-d7661f1f60ef.html
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« Reply #93 on: March 29, 2019, 11:31:34 am »

The TDA has done much to earn the opprobrium it receives and north Tulsans know firsthand all too well the TDA’s failures.  But all the same, it is frustrating to hear elected or self-appointed north Tulsa leaders criticize the city for its lack of development and creation of opportunities in north Tulsa, who then turn around and criticize the very tools the city has to create such development and opportunities in north Tulsa.  Again, I get that the mistrust is real and in many instances is reasonable based on experience, but the resulting “damned if you do and damned if you don’t” approach does not exactly create much incentive for the city to do anything to change the status quo on the ground.
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Conan71
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« Reply #94 on: March 29, 2019, 01:21:02 pm »

The TDA has done much to earn the opprobrium it receives and north Tulsans know firsthand all too well the TDA’s failures.  But all the same, it is frustrating to hear elected or self-appointed north Tulsa leaders criticize the city for its lack of development and creation of opportunities in north Tulsa, who then turn around and criticize the very tools the city has to create such development and opportunities in north Tulsa.  Again, I get that the mistrust is real and in many instances is reasonable based on experience, but the resulting “damned if you do and damned if you don’t” approach does not exactly create much incentive for the city to do anything to change the status quo on the ground.

That seems to be where they are stuck.  You don't gentrify and outside retailers or potential developers see blight and look elsewhere.  You have to make sacrifices if you want to move forward and have the same amenities other parts of the city has.
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« Reply #95 on: April 01, 2019, 09:09:47 am »

That seems to be where they are stuck.  You don't gentrify and outside retailers or potential developers see blight and look elsewhere.  You have to make sacrifices if you want to move forward and have the same amenities other parts of the city has.

I think a big part is the way they go about it and the end results of their past actions. The city uses it to improve corners sure, but the end winners end up being huge national corporate chains like Walgreens. Not exactly savvy economic development or even close to gentrification for all they've messed around in those areas of North Tulsa.

I can see them using that to buy empty lots and unoccupied derelict structures, but buying occupied homes should be something they only do if they have to and have an almost immediately-actionable plan to improve the area for the benefit of the community. Otherwise, they should work around occupied homes. Maybe the TDA should be involved in helping setup affordable new builds in these neighborhoods rather than just demolishing blocks for big developments. Plenty of the homes they buy and demolish are very much liveable or at least salvageable. Many have been classic architectural homes that are more expensive to rebuild than to save. That really takes away character of neighborhoods when those are removed.

The economic plan shouldn't always be to buy and demolish everything and rebuild huge expensive developments. Sometimes just upgrading a few houses at a time would be far better way to improve an area.
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« Reply #96 on: April 01, 2019, 09:19:51 am »

Additionally, if they buy occupied homes, they should pay up for it. Moving and buying a new place is very expensive (average moving costs for a family are around $20k). You usually can't just find an equivalent place. There should be a major incentive package for every person having to move, but instead they just condemn the place and use their appraisals as evidence that they followed eminent domain and do the bare minimum.
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« Reply #97 on: April 04, 2019, 11:18:19 pm »

Phase II of West Park slated to begin soon



https://www.tulsaworld.com/business/second-phase-of-west-park-apartments-set-to-begin-in/article_27b64bf6-6e1d-5ca9-84ad-a91d6370b123.html
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #98 on: April 05, 2019, 08:52:43 am »


I've seen the dirt moving. Rendering looks great! I like the mix of styles and the street-fronting buildings. It makes it look more like a community built over time and less like a planned development built at once. (To avoid the look of typical big low-cost housing developments like this: https://i.redd.it/i5yytkjhb4q21.jpg).

Looks like a big parking lot in middle that's not the greatest look, but hope they can put some nice landscaping to break it up like in Phase 1. I hope there's a Phase 3!

https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/tulsaworld.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/27/1278ffda-11b9-50ae-a96d-ee8c62d51e12/5ca6a54886d54.pdf.pdf
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DowntownDan
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« Reply #99 on: April 05, 2019, 08:52:51 am »

Such a beautiful asphalt courtyard in the middle.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #100 on: April 05, 2019, 08:59:54 am »


I was wondering about the delay and TU's involvement with Phase 2 considering their financial troubles. Article mentions this:

Quote
The first phase was funded by GKFF, the University of Tulsa, the city of Tulsa, state low-income tax credits and financing secured by McCormack Baron Salazar, a national developer that specializes in revitalizing economically distressed urban areas. The second phase is being underwritten by GKFF and the low-income tax credits.

So no more TU involvement and looks like no grad-student apartments planned for this phase. Glad GKFF picked up the slack.

Crazy they have a backlog of 1,000 people! Looks like it's time for folks to start mimicking this concept. I'm guessing with the design of it, it is setup so rent just barely pays the bills over time and keeps it sustainable, rather than going for the 10%+ profit margins real estate tycoons want. GKFF subsidizing it is obviously what gets it going and not skimping on the design.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #101 on: April 05, 2019, 09:10:25 am »

Such a beautiful asphalt courtyard in the middle.

It's not the best look, but tenants have to park somewhere. It is required in city code to provide ample spaces. It is inward-focused with buildings fronting the streets. This rendering is pretty basic, not including playground, trees, etc. Can you link to a better looking subsidized-housing design? Would you rather this block be low density housing or just look like a typical apartment complex which would've been far cheaper and easier to get permits for?

Go look at Phase 1 to see what the parking area looks like. Looks really nice. Rendering makes this look worse than it does in reality with the unique variations of housing fronts and trees.

Here's a glimpse into current lot which has Pergolas, trees and a lot of landscaping:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/601+S+Lewis+Ave,+Tulsa,+OK+74104/@36.154657,-95.9562214,3a,23.9y,201.3h,93.2t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s1juJ1TMulpV9R-bR3w99tw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!4m5!3m4!1s0x87b6ecf3c1322749:0x866f09172e3b68b3!8m2!3d36.1514513!4d-95.9579148
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DowntownDan
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« Reply #102 on: April 05, 2019, 09:34:40 am »

Nope, just complaining about too much asphalt. I don't have the answer to our culture's car addiction. I'm guilty of it myself. I just wish there was a way to accomplish more density and better transit, but I'm convinced it's just not possible in a city like Tulsa where sprawl is so engrained it will never change.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #103 on: April 05, 2019, 09:57:00 am »

Nope, just complaining about too much asphalt. I don't have the answer to our culture's car addiction. I'm guilty of it myself. I just wish there was a way to accomplish more density and better transit, but I'm convinced it's just not possible in a city like Tulsa where sprawl is so engrained it will never change.

I agree, but you're right that it's so ingrained we are stuck with it. The best option here is a more urban-centric car-based lifestyle (living close to everything to minimize your car usage and try walking/bicycle as much as you can), which is what developments like this help with, being close to Whittier town square and downtown.

That is a huge failing on the part of the US to base most all of our cities on a sprawling model which has proven devastating for natural habitats and also contributes to carbon emissions. If the world/US ever do something about CO emissions, the US is going to have an extremely rough time trying to retrofit our cities to be useful without a car (or more realistically switch to electric based on renewables; still expensive and wasteful long-term compared to better urban development).

About time to end the war on nature. 
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« Reply #104 on: April 05, 2019, 10:02:29 am »

Nope, just complaining about too much asphalt. I don't have the answer to our culture's car addiction. I'm guilty of it myself. I just wish there was a way to accomplish more density and better transit, but I'm convinced it's just not possible in a city like Tulsa where sprawl is so engrained it will never change.

I think you have to start somewhere and the most urban parts of the city are the most logical places.  Places like 71st & Memorial, I agree lost cause.  But 6th & Lewis, definitely doable.  And especially downtown and surrounding neighborhoods.
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