A grassroots organization focused on the intelligent and sustainable development, preservation and revitalization of Tulsa.
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 17, 2018, 05:52:37 am
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: More bikes on the road  (Read 4845 times)
OKC_Shane
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 169


« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2011, 07:00:12 pm »

Definitely more cycling in OKC lately, as well. Gas prices and the general popularity of the idea of biking are having an impact I'd say.


As comparison, OKC area has nothing.  Few miles over by Hefner lake.  Can't get to Norman or even Moore on trails.  Unless you know of some secret route, Conan??


Tulsa has a more extensive system for sure, but OKC's trails are quite a bit more than just Lake Hefner now. A lot of work has been done since the Lake Hefner Trail and another 60-70 miles of multipurpose trails are currently funded and under construction (50 miles included in MAPS 3), including links to Moore. Here is a map showing the portions of the network in OKC that are completed, under construction, or fully funded and shovel ready.



Sharrows and bike lanes are also being added throughout the city, which I think could have a lot more potential than trails to increase the visibility of biking as a commute option.
Logged
SXSW
City Father
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3742


WWW
« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2011, 07:37:00 pm »

Shane, is there any push to connect Norman and Moore with OKC via bike trail?  There's a right of way along the BNSF tracks, and already a nice trail by the tracks in Norman.  Add some trees and it could be a nice connection, especially if it connected at the north end to the Oklahoma River trails and downtown's emerging bike lane network thanks to Project 180.  Tulsa's bike lane network downtown is practically non-existent besides a small lane on Archer through Brady. 

As an avid biker myself I would like to see the river loop completed from Jenks to Turkey Mountain on the west bank, and the dual trails (some of the nicest I've seen anywhere in the country) extended south to the Jenks Bridge and Creek Trail.  The east bank is pretty heavily used and having the separated trails is REALLY nice.  Looking forward to the last section under I-44 being completed in the next year.  It would also be nice to see the Midland Valley trail improved from 21st south to the pedestrian bridge...the part north of 21st is newer and nice but the southern section (which is usually pretty busy) is showing its age.

As for bike lanes, I would love to see actual lanes painted on 36th instead of just sharrows and signs.  Plenty of room for such a lane from Hudson all the way to Riverside, right through the center of midtown.  Also bike lanes on 6th from Delaware to downtown, and along several of the major streets through downtown. 
Logged

 
ZYX
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 920


« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2011, 07:50:18 pm »

Shane, is there any push to connect Norman and Moore with OKC via bike trail?  There's a right of way along the BNSF tracks, and already a nice trail by the tracks in Norman.  Add some trees and it could be a nice connection, especially if it connected at the north end to the Oklahoma River trails and downtown's emerging bike lane network thanks to Project 180.  Tulsa's bike lane network downtown is practically non-existent besides a small lane on Archer through Brady. 

As an avid biker myself I would like to see the river loop completed from Jenks to Turkey Mountain on the west bank, and the dual trails (some of the nicest I've seen anywhere in the country) extended south to the Jenks Bridge and Creek Trail.  The east bank is pretty heavily used and having the separated trails is REALLY nice.  Looking forward to the last section under I-44 being completed in the next year.  It would also be nice to see the Midland Valley trail improved from 21st south to the pedestrian bridge...the part north of 21st is newer and nice but the southern section (which is usually pretty busy) is showing its age.

As for bike lanes, I would love to see actual lanes painted on 36th instead of just sharrows and signs.  Plenty of room for such a lane from Hudson all the way to Riverside, right through the center of midtown.  Also bike lanes on 6th from Delaware to downtown, and along several of the major streets through downtown. 

I would like to see the dual trails continued all the way down the east bank in Bixby and connect to Washington Irving Park. If that were to happen, I could ride my bike to the trail, and then theoretically spend a day riding into downtown, hang out there for an hour or so, and back. That would be AMAZING.

I would also love to see bike lanes through midtown and downtown, espescially around TU. Tulsa has the potential to be one of the best biking cities in the country. All the way from rugged mountain biking to smooth, paved trails and lanes for road bikes.
Logged
Conan71
Recovering Republican
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 29130



« Reply #18 on: August 29, 2011, 09:32:26 pm »

What I'll say is that most of the time I find myself bemoaning my inablity to do anything to realize what it is that I want to see her.  I can't build buildings, or start a business.  The most important thing I can do it ride my bike when and where I can.  It's seemingly all I can do.

So I'll do it.

Also, Ed is right.  There should be a TNF Ride.  Does a sunday sound good to people?  If we can agree on a date, we can post it in the happenings forum?

Absolutely.  Let me coordinate when I'm here because it would be a really fun meet-up.

Heir- There's a Monday/Weds. night group which meets in the marina parking lot at Lake Draper.  The common route uses part of the lake road which is pretty safe, parts of Douglas, SE 59th, Hiwassee, and 104th.  I cobble together some other routes out in SE OKC as it's great hill work. You get the odd hillbilly who hates cyclists and displays that indifference but most of those people are used to seeing bikes in the area so they seem to be mostly pretty good with us.

FMC and I ride down Sooner Rd. on Saturdays when we are down there to meet up with a group at the Moore-Norman library and we will take any combination of side roads down to Norman or Noble for breakfast.  Or if the wind is out of the north, we take Shields up to downtown and ride on out to Heffner and back.  OKC's trail system lags far behind Tulsa.  That's for certain one thing we could and should take pride in for overall livability. I've seen parts of a trail system in Del City but have yet to figure it out.
Logged

"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
Conan71
Recovering Republican
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 29130



« Reply #19 on: August 29, 2011, 09:38:25 pm »

Shane, is there any push to connect Norman and Moore with OKC via bike trail?  There's a right of way along the BNSF tracks, and already a nice trail by the tracks in Norman.  Add some trees and it could be a nice connection, especially if it connected at the north end to the Oklahoma River trails and downtown's emerging bike lane network thanks to Project 180.  Tulsa's bike lane network downtown is practically non-existent besides a small lane on Archer through Brady. 

As an avid biker myself I would like to see the river loop completed from Jenks to Turkey Mountain on the west bank, and the dual trails (some of the nicest I've seen anywhere in the country) extended south to the Jenks Bridge and Creek Trail.  The east bank is pretty heavily used and having the separated trails is REALLY nice.  Looking forward to the last section under I-44 being completed in the next year.  It would also be nice to see the Midland Valley trail improved from 21st south to the pedestrian bridge...the part north of 21st is newer and nice but the southern section (which is usually pretty busy) is showing its age.

As for bike lanes, I would love to see actual lanes painted on 36th instead of just sharrows and signs.  Plenty of room for such a lane from Hudson all the way to Riverside, right through the center of midtown.  Also bike lanes on 6th from Delaware to downtown, and along several of the major streets through downtown. 

Harvard to Peoria is wide enough, but I disagree about Hudson to Harvard, it's simply not wide enough with the current curbs.  For cars to give the 3 foot legal pass to a cyclist they have to cross the center line now.  I'd love it if they could do that though, 36th is sort of my expressway to just about everywhere else I bike to around town.
Logged

"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
carltonplace
Historic Artifact
City Father
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4581



WWW
« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2011, 11:44:32 am »

I think if you were to examine the demographics in cites with a higher percentage of transportation bicyclists, you'd find that they're either college towns or cities with a much higher cost of living than Tulsa. I'm convinced that economics has more to do with getting people out of cars and onto bicycles than any amenities we can offer. The biggest competitor for those who would use a bike as transportation is mass transit. If buses, subways, or light rail exist that can serve population centers, the bicycle comes out second best.

Still, I think that commuting by bicycle here in Tulsa is certainly doable. Drivers are accommodating and safety minded - for the most part - and we're at more risk from inattentive motorists than any others. The deliberately hostile or 'homicidal maniac driving a car' are blessedly rare.

And I still think we should all get together for a ride some weekend.

Actually MT and the bike are great partners. Bike to the bus or train which has a space for the bike, disembark and then pedal to your destination.

How about a bash? I think a beer at the end of the Sunday ride would be perfect.
Logged
Conan71
Recovering Republican
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 29130



« Reply #21 on: August 30, 2011, 01:30:43 pm »

Actually MT and the bike are great partners. Bike to the bus or train which has a space for the bike, disembark and then pedal to your destination.

How about a bash? I think a beer at the end of the Sunday ride would be perfect.

Beer at the end of any ride (except a commute to work) is perfect.
Logged

"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
carltonplace
Historic Artifact
City Father
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4581



WWW
« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2011, 01:50:24 pm »

Beer at the end of any ride (except a commute to work) is perfect.

Let's set it up! I'll donate some beer.
Logged
jacobi
Brain owner
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 685



« Reply #23 on: August 30, 2011, 02:12:05 pm »

Ok so sunday.  2 pm?  Meet up at the pedestrian bridge?  Does that work for everyone?
Logged

ἐγώ ἐλεεινότερος πάντων ἀνθρώπων εἰμί
Conan71
Recovering Republican
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 29130



« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2011, 02:17:30 pm »

I'm OOT this weekend, but here the following weekend (the 11th).  Hell make it a standing Sunday ride, always good to have a set time and place to ride with others.
Logged

"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
SXSW
City Father
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3742


WWW
« Reply #25 on: August 30, 2011, 05:38:31 pm »

Harvard to Peoria is wide enough, but I disagree about Hudson to Harvard, it's simply not wide enough with the current curbs.  For cars to give the 3 foot legal pass to a cyclist they have to cross the center line now.  I'd love it if they could do that though, 36th is sort of my expressway to just about everywhere else I bike to around town.

Yes it would have to be widened.  But by connecting all the way to Hudson you then have a direct route south to the bike trail along I-44 (even if it is really short).  There are long-range plans for a longer trail along I-44 to the river. 
Logged

 
cynical
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 326


WWW
« Reply #26 on: August 31, 2011, 10:09:09 am »

I just saw something that shows Tulsa is taking a step toward a more comprehensive bike culture.  It was a cargo bike, a bike with extended rear stays and a flat bed. It resembled Xtracycle's Big Dummy, but without the panniers. 



Just a plain bed for carrying stuff. The rider was wearing a ball cap. He wasn't carrying anything on the bike at the time.
Logged

 
jacobi
Brain owner
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 685



« Reply #27 on: August 31, 2011, 10:21:42 am »

Quote
I just saw something that shows Tulsa is taking a step toward a more comprehensive bike culture.  It was a cargo bike, a bike with extended rear stays and a flat bed. It resembled Xtracycle's Big Dummy, but without the panniers.

I see these often.  Not with the extended rear end, but with the platform on the back.  The saddle bags are really nice.  I'm thinking about working up something syself in this repsect.  Now If only I have some backing....

My original comment was pretty general, but in the last few days I have kept my eyes open to this and have noticed more and more people who are professional types who commute.  If the ciy offered an incentive to compaines to offer a shower to their employees iit would help.  I know that the health department only once use to you one shower once and that it should then be demolished and replaced rather than mutiple people suing the same shower, but It seems like a pretty small thing.  If the incentive is just slightly larger than the cost of building the shower.

And while I'm wishing, i'd like a pony (this may well become my new mantra)
Logged

ἐγώ ἐλεεινότερος πάντων ἀνθρώπων εἰμί
jacobi
Brain owner
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 685



« Reply #28 on: August 31, 2011, 10:23:58 am »

TO be clear, I am going to be at the pedestrian bridge on sunday @2.  Anyone who wants to do a ride, come along and look at riverparks at its busiest.

See you there!
Logged

ἐγώ ἐλεεινότερος πάντων ἀνθρώπων εἰμί
Red Arrow
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 10317


WWW
« Reply #29 on: August 31, 2011, 11:05:00 am »

I know that the health department only once use to you one shower once and that it should then be demolished and replaced rather than mutiple people suing the same shower, but It seems like a pretty small thing. 

I think I know what you wanted to say but your typing fingers and brain were in different gears.  Care to clarify?
Logged

 
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
  Hosted by TulsaConnect and Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
 

Mission

 

"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
more...

 

Contact

 

2210 S Main St.
Tulsa, OK 74114
(918) 409-2669
info@tulsanow.org