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December 03, 2020, 02:09:08 pm
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 11 
 on: December 02, 2020, 11:34:48 am 
Started by SXSW - Last post by LandArchPoke
As I understand it the hydraulic model does not provide for "zero rise" (which is one of the design conditions) at the 100 year flood level with the piers from two bridges that close to the LWD.

Gotcha, interesting and thanks for that info. Any idea on when the plan to demo the bridge?

I wonder if a solution could be to move the new bridge south or further north. If you move it further north then you'd have the benefit of a bridge for the northern part of the gathering place as well - like around where the stop light is... then you almost create a short loop and might encourage more people to walk around to both sides of the river. Might make the city property on the west bank more valuable that way too if they ever decide to vacate it and sell it off.

Benefit of moving it south of the new dam would be the river bank isn't as wide with the bump out that built near the skate park, so you'd gain some cost savings from a shorter bridge that could then go to fixing issues on the old bridge. Seems like most of the bikers/runners come from that direction and would allow for a bypass from the busier part of the trails around the park for people that use the trails for recreation purposes. Might help alleviate some pressure on the trail system through the Gathering Place. 

 12 
 on: December 02, 2020, 09:17:11 am 
Started by SXSW - Last post by Vision 2025
When is the planned demo of the old bridge?

My question is why does the old bridge need to be demoed? I think the new bridge is supposed to be built north of the old bridge, right and it isn't in the way of the new dam I believe - could be wrong though?

Why not keep it open while we can and use it as the pedestrian crossing for walkers, fishing, etc. and the new bridge as a bike/other crossing for faster movement. Especially if we can't afford to install shade or any other amenities. Seems like a win/win and we get separated crossings.


As I understand it the hydraulic model does not provide for "zero rise" (which is one of the design conditions) at the 100 year flood level with the piers from two bridges that close to the LWD.

 13 
 on: December 01, 2020, 07:40:23 pm 
Started by SXSW - Last post by LandArchPoke
The bridge IS in fear of collapse. The existing piers are dangerous and crumbling apart. The whole point of this whole ordeal is that the bridge isn't deemed to be safe in it's current condition.


I wonder if this is really true that it's in fear of collapse or it that's been a 'spin' put on it to push for the new bridge. No doubt there is deferred maintenance on the old bridge that needs to be fixed and I could be wrong, I haven't dug into the history of this much, but I was thinking the main obstacle to keeping the old bridge was that the piers would not support making it a double deck bridge and that modifications to the bridge to facilitate more capacity was far too expensive and we should just build new for that reason. I didn't think the bridge was ever in such poor condition it couldn't be kept in its current fashion for a while. The powers that be just wanted a bigger and nicer bridge that could have separated bike lanes and then an area for pedestrians.

Someone who has read through it could probably answer this, but did the HNTB report just talk about keeping the bridge the way it is and just transferring to new piers or did it go on to discuss that the new piers would allow for the bridge to be modified to a double deck situation that was wanted? Browsing through it this wasn't apparent to me at least.

Even if the piers needed major restoration for safety reasons - why not build a smaller new bridge just for bikes, runners, etc. and then fix the piers on the current bridge, add some new lighting to make it look better at night, etc. and then we solve several of the issues at hand. Seems like the money saved on slightly scaling down the new bridge could possibly pay for repairs to the old bridge to keep it acceptable for pedestrian use.

Seems like there is some solutions out there if the city and others wanted to make it happen, just not sure if they really do. Seems like the entire point of building new has completely evaporated with no shade, seating, and not really having proper spacing between pedestrians and bikes.

We're just getting a crappy version of a new bridge that will have worse functional utility than the old bridge just for vanity purposes to have a bridge designed by MVVA. 

 14 
 on: December 01, 2020, 05:44:43 pm 
Started by SXSW - Last post by shavethewhales
When is the planned demo of the old bridge?

My question is why does the old bridge need to be demoed? I think the new bridge is supposed to be built north of the old bridge, right and it isn't in the way of the new dam I believe - could be wrong though?

Why not keep it open while we can and use it as the pedestrian crossing for walkers, fishing, etc. and the new bridge as a bike/other crossing for faster movement. Especially if we can't afford to install shade or any other amenities. Seems like a win/win and we get separated crossings.

I do get that at some point the old bridge will be unstable and need to be closed but I feel like from what other people have said and what other engineers have said is that bridge isn't in critical fear of collapse. Why not keep it around for another few years, especially until we have the ability to raise money to add shade, etc. to the new bridge. Maybe down the road we can figure out a way to keep both.

The bridge IS in fear of collapse. The existing piers are dangerous and crumbling apart. The whole point of this whole ordeal is that the bridge isn't deemed to be safe in it's current condition.

The proposal to build new piers and move the bridge onto them is intriguing, but at this point it is a lost cause. I'm not happy about the bait and switch with the bridge design, or the fact that this option was kept hidden from the public.

I'm sure in 25 years there will be a new initiative to build a worthy, landmark quality pedestrian bridge somewhere along the river.  Roll Eyes

 15 
 on: December 01, 2020, 04:54:08 pm 
Started by SXSW - Last post by SXSW
When is the planned demo of the old bridge?

My question is why does the old bridge need to be demoed? I think the new bridge is supposed to be built north of the old bridge, right and it isn't in the way of the new dam I believe - could be wrong though?

Why not keep it open while we can and use it as the pedestrian crossing for walkers, fishing, etc. and the new bridge as a bike/other crossing for faster movement. Especially if we can't afford to install shade or any other amenities. Seems like a win/win and we get separated crossings.

I do get that at some point the old bridge will be unstable and need to be closed but I feel like from what other people have said and what other engineers have said is that bridge isn't in critical fear of collapse. Why not keep it around for another few years, especially until we have the ability to raise money to add shade, etc. to the new bridge. Maybe down the road we can figure out a way to keep both.

I agree with this in theory, but likely doesn't match their vision from an aesthetic standpoint.  The new bridge will be built north of the existing bridge.  This shows it well:


The future Jenks low water dam will have a pedestrian bridge, likely similar to the Big Dam Bridge in Little Rock:

 16 
 on: December 01, 2020, 03:28:28 pm 
Started by SXSW - Last post by LandArchPoke
When is the planned demo of the old bridge?

My question is why does the old bridge need to be demoed? I think the new bridge is supposed to be built north of the old bridge, right and it isn't in the way of the new dam I believe - could be wrong though?

Why not keep it open while we can and use it as the pedestrian crossing for walkers, fishing, etc. and the new bridge as a bike/other crossing for faster movement. Especially if we can't afford to install shade or any other amenities. Seems like a win/win and we get separated crossings.

I do get that at some point the old bridge will be unstable and need to be closed but I feel like from what other people have said and what other engineers have said is that bridge isn't in critical fear of collapse. Why not keep it around for another few years, especially until we have the ability to raise money to add shade, etc. to the new bridge. Maybe down the road we can figure out a way to keep both.

 17 
 on: December 01, 2020, 09:03:33 am 
Started by SXSW - Last post by buffalodan
Why would HNTB have lowballed the repair option and on what grounds do you come to that opinion?  (It wasn't a bid to do the work; I'm just not seeing any motive for them to have lowballed.)

So I'm not saying that they did, but there is a ton of research about how projects specifically like this tend to have a very long tail on the expensive end. HNTB is encouraged to come up with a $10mil cost estimate so that they can hopefully get the design. Then you can start throwing fun add-ins and doing more due diligence to get to $30mil. So comparing a scoping estimate of project A to an as-bid to project B doesn't have a ton of value. HNTB may not have realized that OTA was taking up tons of bridge contractors, or that USACE would have more intense scheduling requirements. I trust the low end, but after dealing with more of those type of project engineers do a really bad job of determining the high end of scope creep.

Again, it isn't so much that HNTB is bad, just that there is a lot of research that engineering firms tend to underestimate how expensive public facing /art projects can get. I also want to again state that I still think for $30mil we could have covered bridge with lights and everything, just that saying "HNTB said that the bridge could be saved for $10mil" doesn't hold much weight to me.

 18 
 on: November 30, 2020, 01:15:13 pm 
Started by sgrizzle - Last post by BKDotCom
Should someone tell this petition.. They're late to the conversation?
https://www.thepetitionsite.com/479/148/630/save-the-tulsa-pedestrian-bridge-conduct-an-official-impartial-study/

 19 
 on: November 29, 2020, 09:50:33 pm 
Started by Laramie - Last post by Laramie

Chesapeake Energy Arena, MAPS 4 Initiative


Prolonging the life of OKC's major arena; 16 projects included in the $978 million proposal
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New southwest entrance will improve entering & exiting the arena.



$104 million in upgrades to Chesapeake Arena and $11 million in upgrades to the NBA Thunder Practice Facility



Oklahoma City’s voters delivered a message at the polls on Dec. 10, 2019, a message that will keep the 20-plus year momentum of OKC’s reinvention rolling forward, as the latest installment of a penny sales tax for strategic investment passed by a landslide. The city’s MAPS 4 package received 71.7 percent of the vote, making it the most popular of all MAPS votes. 

Quote
“Tonight we have the largest percentage of support in the history of Oklahoma City,” Holt told those who gathered at the watch party. “This is not just a victory. This is a mandate without historic precedent in our city. We have never been more united as one OKC.”


Approximately 18,400 new replacement seats will supply the arena's renovation.


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 20 
 on: November 29, 2020, 06:18:35 pm 
Started by Laramie - Last post by Laramie

Route 66, Oklahoma City - The Mother Road

Myriad Botanical Gardens has a springtime shower worth of upcoming programming opportunities slated for the season.

“The gardens, over the last four years, has really striven to fill itself with activities of all sorts – for kids, for adults, fitness activities, fun activities, educational stuff,” said Christine Eddington, director of marketing and communications at the gardens. “Our goal is to be really programmed all the time.”--Oklahoma Gazette, April 2015.



As the canal turns south toward the river, it is highlighted by hiking and bicycle trails, water features and landscaped park areas. The Bricktown Water Taxi offers rides down the canal. Various public and private development projects are in progress along its banks.

The Paseo Arts Festival is a great excuse to discover (or hopefully rediscover) the fantastic Paseo Arts District. For over 44 years the annual festival has brought food, fun, music and art to the district’s streets, drawing more than 60,000 weekend visitors to the two day event.



The Oklahoma City Zoo’s new habitat expansion, Sanctuary Asia, (above pic) has been nominated for the USA Today 10 Best Readers' Choice Award for Best Zoo Exhibit!   Since 1990, the zoo has received one-eighth of a cent from the city’s sales tax collections.  Over the next nine years, the Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden could see $71 million in renovations and new exhibits.












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