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October 19, 2021, 12:16:15 am
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 1 
 on: October 18, 2021, 06:20:41 pm 
Started by patric - Last post by tulsabug
Pot-sniffing dogs having to retire, courts vacating sentences; the writing is on the wall as more Americans come around to realizing the "War on Drugs" was just a smokescreen. What else do you do when you are a huge bureaucracy that operates in secret and have to show that you are still relevant?

Indeed. The 'War on Drugs' was as nonsensical as Prohibition but no surprise from the likes of Nixon and the Reagans (Nancy especially).

 2 
 on: October 18, 2021, 02:29:40 pm 
Started by Laramie - Last post by Laramie



Oklahoma City's 2021 Stockyards Stampede



Historic Stockyard City



Parade Route on OKC's Exchange Avenue



Oklahoma City's National Stockyards

Home to the Oklahoma National Stockyards, it is the world’s largest feeder and stocker cattle market, where live cattle open public auctions take place every Monday and Tuesday.

     
Popular Restaurants in Stockyard City

A taste of the old west


  Cattlemen's Steakhouse
The oldest continually-operating restaurant in Oklahoma City and a nationally-known Stockyards City staple,
Cattlemen’s Steakhouse has been visited by Presidents, movie stars, pro athletes and music icons, among others.
It’s worth a visit for a delicious steak, some ever-popular lamb fries and a thick slice of coconut cream pie. If you’re
out-and-about early, they serve one of the hardiest (and best) breakfasts in town.--Oklahoma City E-newsletter


McClintock Saloon & Chop House,
McClintock Saloon & Chop House combines an Old West saloon experience, including 170 types of whiskeys,
with upscale dining, right in the heart of the district.--Oklahoma City E-newsletter




 3 
 on: October 18, 2021, 12:48:24 pm 
Started by patric - Last post by patric
No one is saying it's not an issue - it's always been an issue - but Stitt is only wahwahwahing to score political points with the insane asylum that is the Oklahoma Republican party and doing it with our tax money. Most fentanyl and other illegal drugs get into the US via planes, boats, and trucks at normal ports of entry not drug mules across the border but going after the larger source is not as sexy for Republicans as blaming brown people.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/2019/08/23/fentanyl-flowed-through-us-postal-service-vehicles-crossing-southern-border/

Pot-sniffing dogs having to retire, courts vacating sentences; the writing is on the wall as more Americans come around to realizing the "War on Drugs" was just a smokescreen. What else do you do when you are a huge bureaucracy that operates in secret and have to show that you are still relevant?

 4 
 on: October 18, 2021, 10:43:47 am 
Started by natedog784 - Last post by heironymouspasparagus

I appreciate you checking. I'm kicking around starting a new thread that is old Tulsa pic from Beryl Ford or wherever compared to the current streetview. Comparisons where today it's just a parking lot should be the most fun!  Grin


Let me know when/if you do.  I also found an old pic of Golden Drumstick that I picked up somewhere along the line - not my pic.  I remember going there quite a bit to eat, though, and it looked the same.

 5 
 on: October 18, 2021, 08:15:00 am 
Started by patric - Last post by tulsabug
No one is saying it's not an issue - it's always been an issue - but Stitt is only wahwahwahing to score political points with the insane asylum that is the Oklahoma Republican party and doing it with our tax money. Most fentanyl and other illegal drugs get into the US via planes, boats, and trucks at normal ports of entry not drug mules across the border but going after the larger source is not as sexy for Republicans as blaming brown people.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/2019/08/23/fentanyl-flowed-through-us-postal-service-vehicles-crossing-southern-border/

 6 
 on: October 17, 2021, 09:39:15 pm 
Started by Tulsan - Last post by SXSW
Yes OSU has been rapidly expanding its hospital and health sciences center.  Now they need to turn their attention to the Greenwood campus.  Between OSUHSC, OSU Med Center and Greenwood they could be one of top employers downtown, if they aren’t already.

 7 
 on: October 17, 2021, 03:43:40 pm 
Started by Tulsan - Last post by ComeOnBenjals
https://tulsaworld.com/news/local/watch-now-downtown-tulsa-va-hospital-attracting-attention-for-collaboration/article_f7923f4e-2c4b-11ec-b505-0bed037a15a8.html

Watch Now: Downtown Tulsa VA hospital attracting attention for collaboration

"Friday’s event was billed as a groundbreaking, although no ground was broken, won’t be for at least several more months, and then likely will require jackhammers because the ground being broken is covered by an asphalt parking lot.

The complex’s main feature, a 58-bed VA hospital, is being fashioned from the existing Kerr and Edmondson state office buildings. New construction primarily consists of a new 436-space parking garage to be built and operated by the city of Tulsa and a psychiatric hospital to be owned by Oklahoma State University and operated by the state of Oklahoma."


Exciting! It feels like OSU is really making a play in Tulsa.. I hope they continue to expand downtown. They could really have a second "full time" campus in Tulsa at this rate.

 8 
 on: October 17, 2021, 09:37:20 am 
Started by patric - Last post by patric
(VISUAL) Illegal dumping is a big problem in Oklahoma. To see how close to home this hits, drive into the Fulton neighborhood on 41st Street and East 40th Place (near the BA westbound on-ramp) to see what may be evidence of illegal chemical disposal literally right down the middle of the street.  Ive seen these "trails" out in the sticks for years but this is the first time Ive noticed it in the city proper.

FWIW I dont believe the petroleum industry is the de-facto bad guy, but I believe there are some bad actors that drag everyone else down to their level. Letting toxic waste "leak out" all over a residential neighborhood in the middle of Tulsa would be a powerful example of that.

 9 
 on: October 17, 2021, 09:22:55 am 
Started by patric - Last post by patric
The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified more than 120,000 locations around the US where people may be exposed to a class of toxic “forever chemicals” associated with various cancers and other health problems that is a frightening tally four times larger than previously reported, according to data obtained by the Guardian.

The list of facilities makes it clear that virtually no part of America appears free from the potential risk of air and water contamination with the chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).



Colorado tops the EPA list with an estimated 21,400 facilities, followed by California’s 13,000 sites and Oklahoma with just under 12,000. The facilities on the list represent dozens of industrial sectors, including oil and gas work, mining, chemical manufacturing, plastics, waste management and landfill operations. Airports, fire training facilities and some military-related sites are also included.

The EPA describes its list as “facilities in industries that may be handling PFAS”. Most of the facilities are described as “active”, several thousand are listed as “inactive” and many others show no indication of such status. PFAS are often referred to as “forever chemicals” due to their longevity in the environment, thus even sites that are no longer actively discharging pollutants can still be a problem, according to the EPA.

The tally far exceeds a previous analysis that showed 29,900 industrial sites known or suspected of making or using the toxic chemicals.

People living near such facilities “are certain to be exposed, some at very high levels” to PFAS chemicals, said David Brown, a public health toxicologist and former director of environmental epidemiology at the Connecticut department of health.

Brown said he suspects there are far more sites than even those on the EPA list, posing long-term health risks for unsuspecting people who live near them.

“Once it’s in the environment it almost never breaks down,” Brown said of PFAS. “This is such a potent compound in terms of its toxicity and it tends to bioaccumulate … This is one of the compounds that persists forever.”

A Guardian analysis of the EPA data set shows that in Colorado, one county alone – Weld county – houses more than 8,000 potential PFAS
handling sites, with 7,900 described as oil and gas operations. Oil and gas operations lead the list of industry sectors the EPA says may be handling PFAS chemicals, according to the Guardian analysis.

In July, a report by Physicians for Social Responsibility presented evidence that oil and gas companies have been using PFAS, or substances that can degrade into PFAS, in hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”), a technique used to extract natural gas or oil.

The EPA said in 2019 that it was compiling data to create a map of “known or potential PFAS contamination sources” to help “assess environmental trends in PFAS concentrations” and aid local authorities in oversight. But no such map has yet been issued publicly.

The new data set shows a total count of 122,181 separate facilities after adjustments for duplications and errors in listed locations, and incorporation and analysis of additional EPA identifying information. The EPA facility list was provided to the Guardian by the non-profit Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (Peer), which received it from the EPA through a Freedom of Information request. (Peer is currently representing four EPA scientists who have requested a federal inquiry into what they allege is an EPA practice of ignoring or covering up the risks of certain dangerous chemicals.)

“This shows how PFAS is permeating all industrial sectors,” said Peer’s executive director, Tim Whitehouse.

PFAS chemicals are a group of more than 5,000 man-made compounds used by a variety of industries since the 1940s for such things as
electronics manufacturing, oil recovery, paints, fire-fighting foams, cleaning products and non-stick cookware. People can be exposed through contaminated drinking water, food and air, as well as contact with commercial products made with PFAS.


https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/oct/17/us-epa-pfas-forever-chemicals-sites-data

 10 
 on: October 17, 2021, 08:59:50 am 
Started by patric - Last post by dbacksfan 2.0
No issue with people being trafficked across the border, it's all fake news, just a bunch of nonsense, the border is closed. Nothing to see.

Quote
(CNN)US Border Patrol is working to reunite with their family two young girls found Tuesday wandering near Arizona's border with Mexico.

Two agents found the sisters -- who are 4 and 6 years old -- alone in a marshy area along the Colorado River in Yuma. The area, south of Morelos Dam, "is an often-used crossing point by unaccompanied migrant juveniles," US Border Patrol Yuma Sector said in a post on its Facebook page.
"A Yuma Sector agent, concerned about their safety, quickly approached the young girls, and escorted them to safer terrain," the post said, adding that the girls had a note that contained contact information for their tia, or aunt.
"The girls were taken into custody and attempts will be made to reunite them with family," the post said.

https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/14/us/us-border-patrol-two-girls-arizona/index.html

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"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
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