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November 22, 2017, 12:16:44 pm
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Author Topic: 21st and Yale  (Read 9660 times)
Wilbur
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« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2007, 12:20:15 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by inteller

oh, I bet you think Bank of Oklahoma is just a little local bank and not near as evil as big ole Arvest.

BoK is a conglomerate that just goes by different names in different states.

http://www.bankofarkansas.com/  oh wow look at that!

wait a minute, here's this:  http://www.bankoftexas.com/

and look at this!  http://www.bankofarizona.com/

i could go on and on.  I think it is stupid to be "anti-big corp" and then patron an even bigger conglomerate.

you all complain about  "oh big evil bank changed my terms, took away my free checking, etc etc"  its called Times Are Good, and they dont need customers, so they can get away with it.  When times get bad again soon, all the free checking dels will come back.  all banks are the same....they are all big evil places run by people like the Waltons.

I hear they are calling for a SMUG alert all next week over 21st/Yale and surrounding areas.



Don't forget http://www.csbt.com/
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inteller
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« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2007, 02:11:30 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by flybriz

Unless I was misinformed by a South Park episode I saw not long ago, NO ONE owns Wal-Mart.  Wal-Mart is a life force of its own, capable of thinking, controlling, and spontaneously rebuilding itself if damaged or destroyed.  The "heart" is somewhere near the electronics section.





you are correct.  however Walmart's are generally SMUG free.
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inteller
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« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2007, 02:13:36 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by Double A



Arvest=WalMart, period.



that is wrong and propogating that FUD makes you a liar.
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Breadburner
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« Reply #18 on: March 11, 2007, 05:02:39 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by inteller

quote:
Originally posted by Double A



Arvest=WalMart, period.



that is wrong and propogating that FUD makes you a liar.



+1
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cannon_fodder
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« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2007, 09:41:07 am »

Bank of Oklahoma also owns:
Bank of Albuquerque, N.A
Bank of Arkansas, N.A.
Bank of Oklahoma, N.A.
Bank of Texas, N.A.
Colorado State Bank and Trust, N.A.
 and Bank of Arizona, N.A

It has $17,000,000,000.00 (17B) in assets.

Arvest only has $8,000,000,000.00 (8B).

So if your rage stems from hatred of large banks, you are sorely mislead by the marketing strategy of holding regional banks under the umbrella of BOk Financial.  

Or do you just hate successful people?  If IKEA was founded by one man who made himself into the richest man in the world - would you hate him?  How about Bill Gates, Warren Buffet, the google guys... hated for doing well?

Just curious because I dont get it.

And the shopping center that was on the corner of 21st and Yale was mostly empty and all crappy.  It was either built as crap, not maintained, or run into the ground.  IN any event, I live near there and would rather see a brand new anything than a run down empty building.
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sgrizzle
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« Reply #20 on: March 12, 2007, 12:05:28 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by flybriz

Unless I was misinformed by a South Park episode I saw not long ago, NO ONE owns Wal-Mart.  Wal-Mart is a life force of its own, capable of thinking, controlling, and spontaneously rebuilding itself if damaged or destroyed.  The "heart" is somewhere near the electronics section.





True
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Hometown
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« Reply #21 on: March 12, 2007, 12:11:24 pm »

Mayo Meadows Shopping Center had historic and esthetic value.  The historic period it represented was so recent that most people don't think of it as historic.  The whole intersection of 21st and Yale has been reworked over the years.  What was an attractive, comfortable open space has been reworked and filled it.  Now the development and signage are excessive and the traffic flow is more difficult to maneuver.  It looks a lot more like south Tulsa than it did before.  Tulsa is losing her charm slowly in increments.  This intersection is a good example of that.

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tulsacyclist
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« Reply #22 on: March 12, 2007, 01:09:25 pm »

You can't forget http://www.bankofkansascity.com/.

There's nothing wrong with BOKF or Arvest, in my opinion.
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Porky
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« Reply #23 on: March 12, 2007, 07:52:13 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by tulsacyclist

You can't forget http://www.bankofkansascity.com/.

There's nothing wrong with BOKF or Arvest, in my opinion.



I agree with Arvest, absolutely great bank.

Inteller is right folks, Walmart doesn't own anything as a whole. It's all family members with different interest in the family.

Mrs. Robson (Sam's daughter) is a perfect example. She owns the Walmart buildings and leases them back to another family member in the Walton clan. It's absolutely brilliant they do it this way.
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Steve
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« Reply #24 on: March 12, 2007, 08:13:46 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by Hometown

Mayo Meadows Shopping Center had historic and esthetic value.  The historic period it represented was so recent that most people don't think of it as historic.  The whole intersection of 21st and Yale has been reworked over the years.  What was an attractive, comfortable open space has been reworked and filled it.  Now the development and signage are excessive and the traffic flow is more difficult to maneuver.  It looks a lot more like south Tulsa than it did before.  Tulsa is losing her charm slowly in increments.  This intersection is a good example of that.



Thank you Hometown for actually posting a reply that is on-topic with 21 & Yale development.

I totally agree, 21st & Yale is slowly becoming no different than 61st/71st & Memorial, architecturally speaking.  As a resident of the 21st & Yale area, I welcome new businesses and development, but I sadly miss the mid-twentieth century architecture and feel of the businesses and shopping centers that used to surround my neighborhood, Lortondale.  Remember the old Sears store at 21st & Yale, with its wonderful orange neon signage?  Mayo Meadow center was also awash in beautiful neon signage in its prime in 1950s-1960s with the Humpty Dumpty Grocery, Mayo Meadow Cafeteria, Cinderella Bootery, Argie Lewis Flowers, etc.  

I can only hope that the loss of the Mayo Meadow center serves as a wake-up call to all interested in preserving mid-twentieth century Tulsa.


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cannon_fodder
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« Reply #25 on: March 13, 2007, 07:56:15 am »

I guess I missed something with that shopping center at 21st and Yale.  I went to it a few times and drove by it daily.

It was run down.  Mostly empty. And wasnt an interesting design to begin with. It was just another strip mall, probably from the 1970's.  I saw nothing special about it at all.

In fact, it seems to represent everything you hate about new development:

It was sprawling.  A HUGE parking lot in the front (bigger than the Wal-Mart one).  It had no real character.  Then add to that it was run down and devoid of clients (I think there was the restaurant and a dry cleaners in the whole thing for the last couple of years).  The best use for that building was as parking for the state fair.

While I agree that a Walmart doesn't add much character to a neighborhood, at least it is a useful economic engine that isn't a run down, nearly abandoned eyesore.  They actually removed some parking lot and planted grass.  There lot is usually near full.

This picture perfectly illustrates the usual state of the old strip malls parking lot:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=Tulsa,+OK&layer=&ie=UTF8&z=17&ll=36.132312,-95.923508&spn=0.003908,0.010815&t=k&om=1

That is to say, empty.

Is it better to have run down and empty than new and Walmart?  Is this just an extension of Walmart hating or did you really like that building for some reason?  IMHO, it had less character than the much maligned nuevo renaissance schtuff. Even less character than the strip mall down the street at 41st and Yale or maybe even the Walmart that is there now. Maybe it was just its abandon state - but I remain totally unimpressed by its design.
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inteller
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« Reply #26 on: March 13, 2007, 04:35:49 pm »

oh no, to hear it told here that place was an architectural masterpiece.
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Wilbur
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« Reply #27 on: March 13, 2007, 07:33:11 pm »

Does anyone here believe that, before the changes at 21st and Yale, the area was dieing?  Of course it was.  Now look at what is happening.  Growth.  Stagnate leads no place.
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CoffeeBean
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« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2015, 12:58:00 pm »

Anyone know what's going in to the east of the neighborhood walmart?
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saintnicster
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« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2015, 04:07:41 pm »

Anyone know what's going in to the east of the neighborhood walmart?

Current theory is a DQ http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/retail/dairy-queen-plans-a-blizzard-of-new-tulsa-area-restaurants/article_b4c42475-f989-56e4-95e8-7d76eda0e6cd.html

Quote
Caitlin D. Boewe is a CB Richard Ellis broker who, along with Lindsey Morehead, has been working to find new sites for Dairy Queens for Vasari. Boewe said they’re finalizing a third site that could be finished by the end of the year.

“We’ve got several areas identified for expansion, including Tulsa Hills, east Tulsa, midtown near 21st and Yale, and Woodland Hills,” she said.
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