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July 21, 2019, 11:37:33 am
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Author Topic: Young and Restless in a Knowledge Economy  (Read 1027 times)
TheArtist
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« on: August 15, 2006, 04:19:25 pm »

I ran across this article on the web.  It strikingly lays out much of what I have often harped on in many threads on here.  About how to attract people to our city, how to grow our economy, why many of my friends leave Tulsa and others can not or will not move here.  I have noticed all these trends first hand with my peers over the last decade.  This article further confirms my experiences. Its imperative that Tulsa learn these lessons quickly.

http://www.ceosforcities.org/rethink/research/files/CEOs_YNR_FINAL.pdf

  Some of the high points of this article....


1.   The calculus of urban economic success has changed. Talent particularly well-educated young adults, now plays a DECISIVE role.  

2.  Over the next decade, all of the forces (baby boomer gen. etc.)that converged to create our familiar pool of talent will collapse or reverse.  The competition between cities for the talented, educated,young will be intense.

3.  During the 1990s the preference of young adults for close-in neighborhoods increased sharply.  They prefer to live in dense urban, walkable environments. Around 62% of ALL 25-34yo. live in the 50 largest metro areas, the vast majority of those in the central core. However even in these top 50 cities many were losers,of young adults,(wont mention any names lol) and many disproportionately gained.

4.  These young people are more likely to be entrepreneurs, starting and growing the new businesses that bring economic growth and vitality to an area.  (Especially an area that wont be able to count on its oil resources forever, again we wont mention any names lol)

5.  Urban leaders must consider how to make their cities more appealing to young adults.

6.   RATHER THAN A WORLD IN WHICH PLACES COMPETE FOR BUSINESSES [AND PEOPLE FOLLOW], WE WILL INCREASINGLY LIVE IN A WORLD WHERE PLACES COMPETE FOR PEOPLE [AND BUSINESSES FOLLOW].

7.  Vibrant urban neighborhoods are an economic asset.  Close-in neighborhoods with, higher density, mixed uses,walkable destinations, lively commercial districts, and interesting streets, make a region more competitive.

8.  The importance of being different. There is an increasing importance in a place having distinctiveness, a unique identity. Places with a sense of possibility and opportunity, where the circle is open, where new ideas are welcomed, are also more likely to attract young adults.

9.  Having an Information Economy, with Educational infrastructure, "Colleges, research institutions, etc."is also key.  http://www.ceosforcities.org/rethink/research/files/CEOsforCitiesGradsNFads.pdf
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"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
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