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August 23, 2019, 04:05:34 pm
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Author Topic: Woodland Hills mall to get an apple retail store?  (Read 4848 times)
okcpulse
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« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2007, 11:14:33 am »

quote:
They are going to open a Apple store at Woodland Hills and one in OKC as well.


The Apple Store in OKC at Penn Square Mall has been open almost two years now, unless they are planning to open another in the OKC metro area, but I doubt that.
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osu9400
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« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2007, 01:52:58 pm »

Pulse-

you have that right. the hardware is the exact same as PC hardware now. In fact, with a special apple program called bootcamp, you can now run windows on a mac computer.

On top of that Apple didn't even write the core of the their operating system. They took an existing core and basically put a UI and other services around it.

I used to spout OSX was more secure, but with the slew of fixes and patches the past year, I don't belive that any more. A security firm even announced this week that OSX plugged more security hole that MS did on XP.

Yes, over-priced.

I have always said that Mac people will buy whatever Steve Jobs sells them. I mean that literally and figuratively.

If someone wants me to go into more details I will, but I think Apple is considering dumping their operating system into the opensource community and focusing on selling hardware and gadgets. Why else would they work so hard to make their hardware Windows compatible? After years of claiming to have a superior platform, they immediately announce (spin) that they are switching to Intel. Apple's best years has been the last 3, but their market-share is still barely above 3%. They are not making much money on computer sales, but they are making a killing on gadgets like the ipod. I think bootcamp is really a measuing stick to see if people want to run windows on Apple hardware.



quote:
Originally posted by okcpulse

I disagree.  The hardware isn't anymore advanced than PC hardware.  In fact, it IS PC hardware.  Their motherboards are Intel boards, memory is DDR2 from your standard third party vendors.  The only "advancement" in hardware is the shell, and if that is ture, that is one EXPENSIVE shell.  

The older G5 Gigabt Logic motherboards were more than $600 for a field replacement unit.  That is $400 more than the highest-performing aftermarket PC motherboard.

And Mac OS X?  That doesn't make Macs expensive.  MacOS X is $129 a copy.  So Apple is charging a premium.  I built my own PC.  Been running beautifully for two years.  Still no issues.  And since I have been running Windows Vista Home Premium since January, I still have no problems.  Vista runs all of my applications better than XP ever did, and writing code on Vista is a dream.

I'm not saying Macs are bad.  They are good computers.  Just overpriced, IMO.

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sgrizzle
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« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2007, 02:24:54 pm »

OSX did patch more holes, but majority of those holes have never had a virus written for them.

There are currently 236,000 known viruses. 7 effect the mac. That is less than 1 percent, despite the fact that Mac's make up over 10% of the PC market.
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osu9400
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« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2007, 10:10:34 am »

you can't let your personal feelings skew the facts one way or another. As I stated, I'm no MS lover, but I understand each platform has its strengths & weaknesses.

There have been viruses written for Intel based machines since the 1980s. Many of those are not valid today. Do you remember the Stoned virus? Viruses just don't appear, people write them. If someone is going to take the time to write one, they are going to write for Windows because of the pure number of people and companies that use the OS. In addition, there are hundreds of tools to write apps (good and bad) for the platform and there are even tutorials on how to write malware for Windows.

When Mac owners claim their system is secure as fort knox they don't know what they are talking about. In fact, there was a project in January called MoAB (Month of Apple Bugs) where one guy set out to find a security hole in OSX every day in January. He stated later that it was even easier than he thought it would be and even found multiple exploits in the same day. This guy is an Apple user who thinks other Apple users are being naive.

Where did you find that OSX has an overall share of 10%? OSX may have had a 10% share for new sales in a particular quarter, but their overall share is still low. Here is a quote from OSWeekly late last year:

"While OS X appeared to be having a small increase in usage during the later part of last year (2005), the numbers show that OS X market share fell from 4.35 percent in December 2005 to 4.33 percent in August 2006, and that figure includes the usage of Mac Intel machines."



quote:
Originally posted by sgrizzle

OSX did patch more holes, but majority of those holes have never had a virus written for them.

There are currently 236,000 known viruses. 7 effect the mac. That is less than 1 percent, despite the fact that Mac's make up over 10% of the PC market.

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sgrizzle
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« Reply #19 on: March 30, 2007, 11:36:40 am »

quote:
Originally posted by osu9400

you can't let your personal feelings skew the facts one way or another. As I stated, I'm no MS lover, but I understand each platform has its strengths & weaknesses.

There have been viruses written for Intel based machines since the 1980s. Many of those are not valid today. Do you remember the Stoned virus? Viruses just don't appear, people write them. If someone is going to take the time to write one, they are going to write for Windows because of the pure number of people and companies that use the OS. In addition, there are hundreds of tools to write apps (good and bad) for the platform and there are even tutorials on how to write malware for Windows.

When Mac owners claim their system is secure as fort knox they don't know what they are talking about. In fact, there was a project in January called MoAB (Month of Apple Bugs) where one guy set out to find a security hole in OSX every day in January. He stated later that it was even easier than he thought it would be and even found multiple exploits in the same day. This guy is an Apple user who thinks other Apple users are being naive.

Where did you find that OSX has an overall share of 10%? OSX may have had a 10% share for new sales in a particular quarter, but their overall share is still low. Here is a quote from OSWeekly late last year:

"While OS X appeared to be having a small increase in usage during the later part of last year (2005), the numbers show that OS X market share fell from 4.35 percent in December 2005 to 4.33 percent in August 2006, and that figure includes the usage of Mac Intel machines."



The number of known viruses I listed was current, not old times viruses. Even if mac holds 5% market share, they don't have even close to that in viruses.

There are two ways to look at security. You can argue that the U.S Northern border is vulnerable to attack by whale. Since, however, no whales have ever shown a desire to enter the country accross the canadian border, it doesn't really matter.

Plain and simple, both OS's have whole but Microsoft has thousands of terrorist whales and Mac has basically none.
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okcpulse
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« Reply #20 on: April 01, 2007, 09:37:56 pm »

I haven't had any viruses show up on my Windows Vista PC.  Not even on my RC1 copy of Vista.  

One of the reasons I believe Apple will not let Mac OS X get installed on PCs (installation is prevented by the TPM chip) is that Mac OS X would lose its utopic setup on the Apple platform.  Market share for OS X could skyrocket, and attacks would be directed at OS X.
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TulsaFan-inTexas
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« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2007, 08:22:24 am »

I've been running with a PC for three years (Windows XP Pro) now and have had NO viruses, not one. I avoid Internet Explorer like the plague, and am running no special security programs. This whole apple/mac thing is way overblown. I've used both, and Apple is not easier or more intuitive to use, at least for me.

In fact, the last time I tried to use a Mac it was so "intuitive" that I found it difficult to navigate - although I have to say that could have been as a result of the person who owned the computer and set it up; he was a kool-aid drinking Mac user that set up the UI to where it was so alien that nothing seemed to make sense.

Obviously, being a Mac devotee, he was far more intelligent and creative than the rest of us so he knew what was best. To delete a friggin' file, you had to go through three or four steps. But hey, you know those icons on the desktop were so much more cool than the ones I had on my windows PC!

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RecycleMichael
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« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2007, 08:24:00 am »

What is the big deal about an Apple retail store?

My grocery sells six different varieties and I can buy them one at a time or by the bag.
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Johnboy976
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« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2007, 11:07:54 am »

I have to say that security goes with the size of the market. Why create a virus for a product that has very little share in the market? It makes perfect sense that Macs are more secure.
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grahambino
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« Reply #24 on: April 02, 2007, 11:26:02 am »

ive used a windows PC for years & years.  all the software I use is free or already available and ive never had any virus.

-wireless router w/ MAC filter, 2 leases on DHCP, WPA-psk encryption & no SSID broadcast.
-Windows has a built-in software firewall.
-AVG-Free antivirus
-Firefox w/ noscript (disables java unless allowed on websites) & adblock extensions.

i dont buy the argument that a mac is any safer.
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osu9400
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« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2007, 03:28:01 pm »

IE6 is a total security risk. I suggest that everyone upgrade to IE7 even if they don't use IE at all. IE is such an integral part of the OS.

I use FireFox for most of my browsing (like right now), but I have been trying to switch back to IE. IE seems to be faster than FF and now it looks more modern. I still haven't transitioned back yet, but IE7 is light years ahead of IE6 in terms of security.


quote:
Originally posted by Johnboy976

I have to say that security goes with the size of the market. Why create a virus for a product that has very little share in the market? It makes perfect sense that Macs are more secure.

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