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Author Topic: Oklahoma City Bridges, Streets, Overpass and Interstate Junctions  (Read 637 times)
Laramie
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« on: November 10, 2020, 01:53:45 pm »


Oklahoma City Roads & Street Infrastructure.








The 10 Lane I-40 Crosstown Expressway handles the volumes of daily traffic in our State's Largest City

$967 million Bond Package

On September 12, 2017, Oklahoma City voters approved 13 bond propositions and two sales tax initiatives known as the Better Streets, Safer City projects.

The 10-year, $967 million bond package invests in streets, police and fire facilities, parks and other basic needs. It succeeds the 2007 bond program, which is almost complete.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2020, 01:58:05 pm by Laramie » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2020, 02:03:16 pm »



Oklahoma City's CBD Construction Towers & Infrastructure Pains



Construction on what was once Oklahoma City's two tallest towers prior to Devon Tower (BancFirst & First National) continues to delay construction and resurfacing of street work coupled with the $967 million General Obligation Bonds passed in 2017 that will resurface and repair a majority of Oklahoma City's streets, roads & bridges.  The convention center complex along Robinson has begun street resurface projects.
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Laramie
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« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2020, 11:18:21 pm »

.


Heartland Flyer, Oklahoma City


Oklahoma City Intermodal Transportation Hub


Amtrak:  Oklahoma City to Fort Worth, Texas

Heartland Flyer Extension Infrastructure Needs Assessment

BNSF has provided the preliminary capital investment costs to operate the proposed Amtrak service connecting Newton, KS to Oklahoma City, OK based on current freight rail traffic and capacity.  While this is an important step forward, the State still needs significant information to evaluate establishing Heartland Flyer service.

A summary of the estimated preliminary capital investment costs and likely next steps are outlined below.  

Preliminary capital investment cost:  

          The preliminary cost estimates to improve BNSF rail infrastructure are based on current freight traffic and current capacity levels.  
          Note –these costs do not include station stops (e.g., platforms, station buildings, station operating costs,etc.).

The total infrastructure cost for 79 mph service is $124.4 million, including:

               Kansas rail improvements $31.2 million
               Oklahoma rail improvements $93.2 million

These costs include:

          o     $28.8M (across both states) for upgrades necessary for 79 mph operating speed
          o     $15.8M for an extension of a siding on the Arkansas City, BNSF Kansas subdivision rail (2.3 miles)
          o     $79.8M for an extension of a siding near Oklahoma City (4 miles –includes 5 bridges)

The reason the needed Kansas investment is substantially less than the Oklahoma investment is because BNSF is currently investing in track improvements and additions from Emporia to Wellington that result in improved freight flows on the rail corridor between Newton and Mulvane. This reduces the need to expand track infrastructure along that corridor which was originally outlined in previous assessments.

Additional analysis based on future freight capacity is still in development and will be necessary for future planning of the service.

Next Steps:   There are several key next steps in the planning process for this service.

     1.   Discuss these cost estimates with our partner state, Oklahoma,because infrastructure improvements will be required within their state borders.
           KDOT has been in consistent communication with Oklahoma Department of Transportation officials regarding this service and will maintain that
           communication as information becomes available.

     2.   Develop an updated service development plan.  This is a necessary step to fully understand the resources needed to implement and operate the service.

           o     KDOT will partner with Amtrak, stakeholders including communities and agencies to update the service development plan which that will guide
                  future implementation of the service.

           o     Funding for Amtrak start-up costs will be needed along with the infrastructure investment that BNSF requires, and the annual operating cost.

           o     Local partnerships are also vital as commitments from local communities are necessary for future action. Communities that have stops in the
                  updated Service Development

           Plan will need to commit to investing in station stops and necessary investment for the service.

     3.   BNSF will need to complete the second phase of the infrastructure needs assessment that focuses on a future growth scenario(instead of the
           current scenario for which we now have cost estimates) to provide final cost estimates necessary for future implementation of the service.
      
           Note:  BNSF will not complete the final analysis until a commitment of state or local funding is made to establish the Heartland Flyer service on the corridor.

           In order to demonstrate that commitment, we need to secure commitments from Oklahoma and the station stop communities.  

     4.   KDOT and communities need to explore regional support for the investment in passenger rail at upcoming local consult meetings because an investment
           of this magnitude is consistent with modernization and expansion projects on the highway system.  KDOT is pleased to have the first modal project to be
           considered alongside highway projects –this represents a positive step in viewing our transportation system and investments from a multi-modal
           perspective.

     5.   It should also be noted that KDOT is working in good faith from preliminary cost estimates and as information is released to KDOT, we will maintain
           transparency and keep stakeholders informed of any progress.

If you have any questions please contact Chris Herrick, Chris.Herrick@ks.gov.



.



Heartland Flyer test train:  Oklahoma City to Wichita & Kansas City.

Amtrak's Heartland Flyer extension test train brought crowds trackside along the Oklahoma City to Kansas City route. The train ran from the former Santa Fe station in Oklahoma City, departing at 7:45 a.m., and terminated at Kansas City Union Station at 5:30 p.m. Stops included Guthrie, Perry, and Ponca City in Oklahoma, and Arkansas City, Wichita, Newton, Emporia, and Topeka in Kansas.

Amtrak officials and state leaders have discussed extending the Heartland Flyer north into Kansas for several years, though it’s unclear how much progress they’ve made. But even though the coronavirus has caused state agencies and Amtrak to lose money, talks of expanding the Flyer are still ongoing.







« Last Edit: November 24, 2020, 11:34:43 pm by Laramie » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2020, 12:45:03 am »

.


Heartland Flyer, Oklahoma City


Oklahoma City Intermodal Transportation Hub


Amtrak:  Oklahoma City to Fort Worth, Texas

Heartland Flyer Extension Infrastructure Needs Assessment

BNSF has provided the preliminary capital investment costs to operate the proposed Amtrak service connecting Newton, KS to Oklahoma City, OK based on current freight rail traffic and capacity.  While this is an important step forward, the State still needs significant information to evaluate establishing Heartland Flyer service.

A summary of the estimated preliminary capital investment costs and likely next steps are outlined below.  

Preliminary capital investment cost:  

          The preliminary cost estimates to improve BNSF rail infrastructure are based on current freight traffic and current capacity levels.  
          Note –these costs do not include station stops (e.g., platforms, station buildings, station operating costs,etc.).

The total infrastructure cost for 79 mph service is $124.4 million, including:

               Kansas rail improvements $31.2 million
               Oklahoma rail improvements $93.2 million

These costs include:

          o     $28.8M (across both states) for upgrades necessary for 79 mph operating speed
          o     $15.8M for an extension of a siding on the Arkansas City, BNSF Kansas subdivision rail (2.3 miles)
          o     $79.8M for an extension of a siding near Oklahoma City (4 miles –includes 5 bridges)

The reason the needed Kansas investment is substantially less than the Oklahoma investment is because BNSF is currently investing in track improvements and additions from Emporia to Wellington that result in improved freight flows on the rail corridor between Newton and Mulvane. This reduces the need to expand track infrastructure along that corridor which was originally outlined in previous assessments.

Additional analysis based on future freight capacity is still in development and will be necessary for future planning of the service.

Next Steps:   There are several key next steps in the planning process for this service.

     1.   Discuss these cost estimates with our partner state, Oklahoma,because infrastructure improvements will be required within their state borders.
           KDOT has been in consistent communication with Oklahoma Department of Transportation officials regarding this service and will maintain that
           communication as information becomes available.

     2.   Develop an updated service development plan.  This is a necessary step to fully understand the resources needed to implement and operate the service.

           o     KDOT will partner with Amtrak, stakeholders including communities and agencies to update the service development plan which that will guide
                  future implementation of the service.

           o     Funding for Amtrak start-up costs will be needed along with the infrastructure investment that BNSF requires, and the annual operating cost.

           o     Local partnerships are also vital as commitments from local communities are necessary for future action. Communities that have stops in the
                  updated Service Development

           Plan will need to commit to investing in station stops and necessary investment for the service.

     3.   BNSF will need to complete the second phase of the infrastructure needs assessment that focuses on a future growth scenario(instead of the
           current scenario for which we now have cost estimates) to provide final cost estimates necessary for future implementation of the service.
      
           Note:  BNSF will not complete the final analysis until a commitment of state or local funding is made to establish the Heartland Flyer service on the corridor.

           In order to demonstrate that commitment, we need to secure commitments from Oklahoma and the station stop communities.  

     4.   KDOT and communities need to explore regional support for the investment in passenger rail at upcoming local consult meetings because an investment
           of this magnitude is consistent with modernization and expansion projects on the highway system.  KDOT is pleased to have the first modal project to be
           considered alongside highway projects –this represents a positive step in viewing our transportation system and investments from a multi-modal
           perspective.

     5.   It should also be noted that KDOT is working in good faith from preliminary cost estimates and as information is released to KDOT, we will maintain
           transparency and keep stakeholders informed of any progress.

If you have any questions please contact Chris Herrick, Chris.Herrick@ks.gov.



.



Heartland Flyer test train:  Oklahoma City to Wichita & Kansas City.

Amtrak's Heartland Flyer extension test train brought crowds trackside along the Oklahoma City to Kansas City route. The train ran from the former Santa Fe station in Oklahoma City, departing at 7:45 a.m., and terminated at Kansas City Union Station at 5:30 p.m. Stops included Guthrie, Perry, and Ponca City in Oklahoma, and Arkansas City, Wichita, Newton, Emporia, and Topeka in Kansas.

Amtrak officials and state leaders have discussed extending the Heartland Flyer north into Kansas for several years, though it’s unclear how much progress they’ve made. But even though the coronavirus has caused state agencies and Amtrak to lose money, talks of expanding the Flyer are still ongoing.


We might be more interested here in Tulsa when train service comes through Tulsa.
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Laramie
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« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2020, 09:37:45 am »

We might be more interested here in Tulsa when train service comes through Tulsa.

The 'Demand' is probably there; it's a matter of time.  The Union Depot in Tulsa is beautiful structure--Tulsa has a better base infrastructure than OKC.  Would love to see this beautiful structure up and running again.


I know it's being used for something else; however is the Sapulpa station operable...

Tulsa would add an important key route which would link Tulsa to Fort Worth (via OKC) and Kansas City (via Wichita-Newton).  Eventually, if the Heartland Flyer returns north into Kansas from OKC, you'll see an immediate plan to spur a route into Tulsa with a triangle route to serve Wichita, Tulsa and OKC.  

IIRC Newton, Kansas is the key link route to Chicago.

              
« Last Edit: November 25, 2020, 09:39:20 am by Laramie » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2020, 09:24:33 pm »


Street near convention center named in honor of Mayor Mick Cornett



The street is being designed to host special events in support of the convention center. (Mayor Holt)
OKLAHOMA CITY (KOKH) - The longest serving mayor in Oklahoma City history is being honored in a special way.

Fox 25 News OKC https://okcfox.com/news/local/street-near-convention-center-named-in-honor-of-cornett



Cornett Drive

« Last Edit: November 27, 2020, 10:04:52 pm by Laramie » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2020, 05:00:42 pm »


Route 66, Oklahoma City - The Mother Road

Today the stockyards remains the world's largest stocker and feeder cattle market.  Main Street is lined with a number of shops filled with Western wear to dress you in attire from head to toe and unique stores with handmade products and housewares. If you like country music, Rodeo Opry along Exchange Avenue offers live music for your entertainment.  The mission of Main Street is to preserve Western culture and the feel of the old west in a modern setting.

National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum which houses the largest collection of Cowboy memorabilia in the country have over 28,000 Western and American Indian art works and artifacts including the world’s most extensive collection of rodeo photographs.

Pop’s Route 66 – Giant Pop Bottle, The 66-ft LED pop bottle is hard to miss. Pop’s is where modern architecture meets roadside attraction. The huge futuristic canopy stretches 100 feet (unsupported!), to shelter car and their occupants from sun, rain and snow.

Pop’s signature is soda pop – with a selection of more than 400 ice-cold sodas and beverages. There is a full-service grill and self-serve gas station, so you might as well stop. Get there at dusk if you can, for a great photo op.  The LED pop bottle is 11 feet taller than Texas State Fair's Big Tex.


Originally built by a local farmer in 1898 and restored in 1992, the red round barn in Arcadia at one time was one of the most photographed landmarks on Route 66. It is now a resource for Route 66 information and shop along the route.

On the morning of April 19, 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City was destroyed in a domestic terrorist attack when a bomb exploded, killing 168 people. The Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum was created to remember those who were killed, those who survived, and those changed forever.







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Laramie
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« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2020, 06:18:35 pm »


Route 66, Oklahoma City - The Mother Road

Myriad Botanical Gardens has a springtime shower worth of upcoming programming opportunities slated for the season.

“The gardens, over the last four years, has really striven to fill itself with activities of all sorts – for kids, for adults, fitness activities, fun activities, educational stuff,” said Christine Eddington, director of marketing and communications at the gardens. “Our goal is to be really programmed all the time.”--Oklahoma Gazette, April 2015.



As the canal turns south toward the river, it is highlighted by hiking and bicycle trails, water features and landscaped park areas. The Bricktown Water Taxi offers rides down the canal. Various public and private development projects are in progress along its banks.

The Paseo Arts Festival is a great excuse to discover (or hopefully rediscover) the fantastic Paseo Arts District. For over 44 years the annual festival has brought food, fun, music and art to the district’s streets, drawing more than 60,000 weekend visitors to the two day event.



The Oklahoma City Zoo’s new habitat expansion, Sanctuary Asia, (above pic) has been nominated for the USA Today 10 Best Readers' Choice Award for Best Zoo Exhibit!   Since 1990, the zoo has received one-eighth of a cent from the city’s sales tax collections.  Over the next nine years, the Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden could see $71 million in renovations and new exhibits.











« Last Edit: November 29, 2020, 06:20:49 pm by Laramie » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2020, 11:47:36 am »


I-235/I-44 Interchange, Oklahoma City




The I-235/US-77/I-44 Interchange project, consists of a three-mile segment of north-south urban interstate highway located between 36th Street on the south and 63rd Street on the north in Oklahoma City and two urban interchanges (NW 36th Street and NW 63rd Street) and the I-44/I-235 four-level interstate interchange.
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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2020, 12:45:38 pm »

Oklahoma City Boulevard


Pic via OKCTalk.com
The boulevard now runs east and west from the I-40/I-235 interchange near downtown and merges into I-40 near N. Villa on the west. It dissects Myriad Gardens Park on the north and the new Scissortail Park (lower park) under construction to the south.

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation has built the boulevard as the last phase of the entire I-40 project and is turning it over to the City of Oklahoma City once completed.

The boulevard follows the right of way of the original elevated I-40 Crosstown Expressway which was removed once the I-40 corridor was moved five blocks to the south.--Oklahoma City Free Press--Friday, December 18, 2020
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« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2020, 03:21:26 pm »



I-235/I-44 update pics via OKCTalk.com



One of the flyovers is in use



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« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2021, 07:08:33 pm »




I-235/I-44 Interchange update pic via OKCTalk.com



Taken 01/17/2021, Join the discussion https://www.okctalk.com/showthread.php?t=24127&page=83&p=1153629#post1153629

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