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October 21, 2019, 07:21:40 am
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Author Topic: The Village at Whittier Heights  (Read 1134 times)
brettakins
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« on: March 11, 2019, 07:31:28 am »


The Village at Whittier Heights

I drove pass Las Americas supermarket on N Lewis and seen a coming soon sign across the street with that stated "The Village at Whittier Heights"

Later on I googled it and received no results. Does anyone have any information on this development?
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 06:19:12 pm by brettakins » Logged
SXSW
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« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2019, 09:27:59 pm »

It could be part of the West Park development, or an adjacent development.  Lots of new housing going up in that area.



http://tallgrasscd.com/my-product/kendall-whittier-west-park-ii/
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 09:30:02 pm by SXSW » Logged

 
rebound
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2019, 09:17:52 am »


The Village at Whittier Heights

I drove pass Las Americas supermarket on N Lewis and seen a coming soon sign across the street with that stated "The Village at Whittier Heights"

Later on I googled it and received no results. Does anyone have any information on this development?

I googled it just now and found several links.   It is a development being done by Habitat For Humanity. 

Boomtown Development
https://www.tulsahabitat.com/boomtown
OK Magazine article:
http://www.okmag.com/blog/2018/04/05/a-firm-foundation/

Habitat For Humanity site, with reference:
https://scontent-dfw5-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/53832763_10156277200509422_6692391480549441536_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&_nc_ht=scontent-dfw5-1.xx&oh=c6c17151cc8d430063e120ef1de5363e&oe=5D202408

TulsaHabitat FB page, with news video:
https://www.facebook.com/tulsahabitat/posts/10154954110336391

Looks like it was also mentioned on this forum, back in April, 2017:
http://www.tulsanow.org/forum/index.php?topic=18904.60
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2019, 11:53:03 am »

It could be part of the West Park development, or an adjacent development.  Lots of new housing going up in that area.



http://tallgrasscd.com/my-product/kendall-whittier-west-park-ii/

The Village at Whittier Heights is at N Lewis, across from the large grocery store north of I244.

The Kendall Whittier West Park II at 5th and S Lewis looks like it is starting but no sign is up. They were putting in drainage/plumbing recently. It's great that 2 big residential projects are going on at the same time around here.
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dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2019, 12:37:48 pm »

I googled it just now and found several links.   It is a development being done by Habitat For Humanity. 

Boomtown Development
https://www.tulsahabitat.com/boomtown
OK Magazine article:
http://www.okmag.com/blog/2018/04/05/a-firm-foundation/

Habitat For Humanity site, with reference:
https://scontent-dfw5-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/53832763_10156277200509422_6692391480549441536_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&_nc_ht=scontent-dfw5-1.xx&oh=c6c17151cc8d430063e120ef1de5363e&oe=5D202408

TulsaHabitat FB page, with news video:
https://www.facebook.com/tulsahabitat/posts/10154954110336391

Looks like it was also mentioned on this forum, back in April, 2017:
http://www.tulsanow.org/forum/index.php?topic=18904.60

Just an observation, I know H4H does a lot of good work, and has a good success rate, but this sounds a little like a new version of Section 8. I hope that it works, it's great to see an area that I always thought of as an arm pit, being given new life.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2019, 03:40:32 pm »

Just an observation, I know H4H does a lot of good work, and has a good success rate, but this sounds a little like a new version of Section 8. I hope that it works, it's great to see an area that I always thought of as an arm pit, being given new life.

What's wrong with a private organization doing their version of subsidized housing? Specifically this is nice, higher end development, especially compared to typical section 8 or regular apartments. The existing "Kendall Whittier West Park I" west of TU is similar concept with mixed-income and subsidized housing and it looks very nice still after several years of use.
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rebound
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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2019, 04:36:12 pm »

What's wrong with a private organization doing their version of subsidized housing? Specifically this is nice, higher end development, especially compared to typical section 8 or regular apartments. The existing "Kendall Whittier West Park I" west of TU is similar concept with mixed-income and subsidized housing and it looks very nice still after several years of use.

When I was looking around earlier, I did notice that the current land owner (at least per the Tulsa Assessor site) is Vintage Housing, Inc.   Vintage Housing develops Senior Living types of communities.  Not sure how the creation of the Boomtown division changes things, but I don't think HFH has historically managed developments like this. It could be that HFH/Boomtown is going to build it, and have Vintage run it day-to-day.   Having a professional organization run the development would go far towards maintaining the overall quality and hold the residents to standards, etc.   Seems like a pretty good idea to me.
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dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2019, 06:43:40 pm »

What's wrong with a private organization doing their version of subsidized housing? Specifically this is nice, higher end development, especially compared to typical section 8 or regular apartments. The existing "Kendall Whittier West Park I" west of TU is similar concept with mixed-income and subsidized housing and it looks very nice still after several years of use.

I didn't say that there was anything wrong with a private organization doing their version of subsidized housing, I actually said that I hope it works if you read my post again. I'm just skeptical about subsidized housing after all of the ones that were built in the late 60's into the 70's around Tulsa (I-44 & 169, near the NE corner of the Tulsa Country Club and Johnson Park come to mind) and the good intentions that were paved then that within 15 years were disasters. I know the ones near the Country Club, Newton & Nogales, has been rebuilt and seemed to be doing well when I was there last.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2019, 03:39:33 pm »

I didn't say that there was anything wrong with a private organization doing their version of subsidized housing, I actually said that I hope it works if you read my post again. I'm just skeptical about subsidized housing after all of the ones that were built in the late 60's into the 70's around Tulsa (I-44 & 169, near the NE corner of the Tulsa Country Club and Johnson Park come to mind) and the good intentions that were paved then that within 15 years were disasters. I know the ones near the Country Club, Newton & Nogales, has been rebuilt and seemed to be doing well when I was there last.

My bad. I thought that was meant as a negative. I agree though that public/subsidized housing has been a disaster overall. The model that is promising is the mixed-income model that is being used by the TU Kendall Whittier West Park. As far as I can see, it looks nice still.

There's a lot of big problems with putting tons of low-income residents together, especially in a high-density environment. Hopefully HFH and these new projects will help alleviate those issues and prove there's a model that can and will work. There's been a lot of studies on why it works and lots of discussion on how to make it work, but the bottom line is that we need comprehensive communities with all ranges of incomes living near each other and helping solve issues together rather than flocking to the farthest suburbs and leaving the poor to fend for themselves.
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« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2019, 08:46:12 pm »

^ I believe this is the same model that will be used for the redevelopment of the Eugene Field neighborhood in West Tulsa.  61st & Peoria seems like a good candidate as well.
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dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2019, 04:06:18 pm »

My bad. I thought that was meant as a negative. I agree though that public/subsidized housing has been a disaster overall. The model that is promising is the mixed-income model that is being used by the TU Kendall Whittier West Park. As far as I can see, it looks nice still.

There's a lot of big problems with putting tons of low-income residents together, especially in a high-density environment. Hopefully HFH and these new projects will help alleviate those issues and prove there's a model that can and will work. There's been a lot of studies on why it works and lots of discussion on how to make it work, but the bottom line is that we need comprehensive communities with all ranges of incomes living near each other and helping solve issues together rather than flocking to the farthest suburbs and leaving the poor to fend for themselves.

That's cool. It sounds like the best way to do something like this is to do it privately than gov't run. They probably have a good screening process that looks into applicants and does a better job of managing the properties as well. Anything that helps people get a leg up and improve themselves and get them in a better position for their future, I'm all for.

I always hoped that Kendall Whittier would get moved in the right direction, as well as other areas, I seem to remember that there was something like this discussed for the W 23rd & Jackson area.

Like I said, when I was there in late 2017 I was impressed with what I saw, I just wish I had more time while I was there. May have to come out this year when I have some time to really explore and look around.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2019, 09:31:33 am »

That's cool. It sounds like the best way to do something like this is to do it privately than gov't run. They probably have a good screening process that looks into applicants and does a better job of managing the properties as well. Anything that helps people get a leg up and improve themselves and get them in a better position for their future, I'm all for.

I always hoped that Kendall Whittier would get moved in the right direction, as well as other areas, I seem to remember that there was something like this discussed for the W 23rd & Jackson area.

Like I said, when I was there in late 2017 I was impressed with what I saw, I just wish I had more time while I was there. May have to come out this year when I have some time to really explore and look around.


Absolutely! I'm looking forward to see what happens with those areas as these places go in and are perhaps copied in different parts of Tulsa. Those lower income people that so many flock away from are just like anyone else: wanting to provide good lives for their family in a safe environment. Having affordable options in nice, safe environments will more than likely help them or their kids break that cycle. That is an essential piece of reducing crime long term (Or you can go the Manhattan route and price all of the poor people out of the area).

Yes, as SXSW mentioned, it looks like it is the plan for the Eugene Field neighborhood in West Tulsa also. After that project announcement, I noticed many of the available homes in that area sold very quickly. Look for a bit of a renaissance to happen there in the coming years. That location is prime, if only they could help nourish more of a community vibe.
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