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March 26, 2019, 10:56:10 am
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Author Topic: Forest Orchard / Pearl District Corridor  (Read 5738 times)
DTowner
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« Reply #30 on: March 12, 2019, 08:51:42 am »

Note in that layout on the right side it says "Connection to Future Park" where existing homes are. They plan to level several entire blocks to create a massive flood-control pond there. They also have yet another one planned for the blocks east of 75, north of 6th street and West of Peoria. So they want to just keep demolishing everything... It's like "Urban Renewal" in the 60s all over again.

The main Pearl Pond is seemingly necessary for flood mitigation (I haven't seen that report) but the one by the highway is a $20 million project that will slightly reduce chance of flooding for 29 low-value properties and 1 expensive property that could have its own mitigation for far cheaper. The plan is to fund it by selling million dollar water front lots to developers!

Don't worry, it will all make sense when that canal is built down the middle of 6th Street.
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« Reply #31 on: March 12, 2019, 10:30:31 am »

Note in that layout on the right side it says "Connection to Future Park" where existing homes are. They plan to level several entire blocks to create a massive flood-control pond there. They also have yet another one planned for the blocks east of 75, north of 6th street and West of Peoria. So they want to just keep demolishing everything... It's like "Urban Renewal" in the 60s all over again.

The main Pearl Pond is seemingly necessary for flood mitigation (I haven't seen that report) but the one by the highway is a $20 million project that will slightly reduce chance of flooding for 29 low-value properties and 1 expensive property that could have its own mitigation for far cheaper. The plan is to fund it by selling million dollar water front lots to developers!

Is that still the plan?  The Pearl is a much different place than it was when that plan was first developed.  Seems like they should be rethinking the flood control plan for this area.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #32 on: March 12, 2019, 12:37:49 pm »

Is that still the plan?  The Pearl is a much different place than it was when that plan was first developed.  Seems like they should be rethinking the flood control plan for this area.

Yes, it is still on their future plans and on their latest map:
http://www.tulsadevelopmentauthority.org/wp-content/uploads/extra/pearl_map.pdf

The smaller west pond will cost an estimated $20 million so the larger one will likely be ~$40-$50 million because it is close to triple the size and is an an area much more densely filled with houses and will require much more infrastructure and changes.

The canal is wishful thinking but would be neat if done well like the Pearl District association proposed. Realistically, we will likely get a large pond with moderate park amenities. Will lose some priceless Victorian and craftsman style houses, but will also clean up a lot of blight, but will be a huge hit on density in that area unless they build multi units all around it. Those residents need somewhere to live.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #33 on: March 12, 2019, 12:41:54 pm »

From a map, it looks like a there is a lot of open space around each of the five buildings, which could account for the high mowing bill (although the picture accompanying the article does not indicate it was being mowed very often).  That may also explain why the economics of rehabbing the existing buildings wonít work.
 
It wasnít clear from the article, but was this put out to bid, or did the group negotiating with TDA have an exclusive deal?  If it was just an exclusive for this one group, it is unclear how the TDA can determine it is not economically feasible to redevelopment the existing buildings.  Given the prior use, I can see why it could be very expensive to rehab these buildings into apartments, but the TDA hasn't exactly earned a lot of blanket trust on these matters over the years.


TDA owns the property (purchased from City of Tulsa a few years ago).  They were getting bids from anyone and looks like just Group M and a couple others worked on the bid to help TDA decide.

On the TDA's Pearl Map, it marks most of the Laura Dester site as a flood water retaining zone including 2 buildings. That might be a big part of why it's not feasible. Look for these buildings to be demolished and remain empty for decades until the big east pond is built.
http://www.tulsadevelopmentauthority.org/wp-content/uploads/extra/pearl_map.pdf

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« Reply #34 on: March 12, 2019, 01:09:11 pm »

Anyone know what timeline the city has to make these improvements?  It would seem that these are pretty important for the neighborhood to grow outside of the 6th St corridor and the Central Park development. 

Iíd put this pretty high up on the cityís priority list because of its location, existing and planned improvements and ties into the big current push to revitalize 11th/Route 66 and the neighborhoods between downtown and TU.
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