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May 24, 2018, 03:20:42 pm
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Author Topic: Saltgrass Steakhouse coming to Tulsa  (Read 1735 times)
heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2018, 09:06:51 am »

Funny, we see more and more people hawking CBD oils, creams, lotions, and other products claimed to have CBD in them around New Mexico.  I hope they go the route of Colorado sooner rather than later to fully legalize it for recreational use.  Then we could have the Hempgrass Steakhouse chain and the signature dessert will be our brownies!


Let me know...will be out for a few days...!!   (Weeks..??)



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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2018, 09:08:33 am »

After less than a second of googling I found this.

noun
1.
any of several grasses, as Distichlis spicata, that grow in salt marshes or meadows or in alkali soil.
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/salt-grass

Each winter, the Longhorn were driven to the Texas Gulf Coast to graze on the rich coastal salt grass. And when they headed for market, they followed the legendary Salt Grass Trail, known far and wide for creating the best beef in the Lone Star State. http://www.saltgrass.com/legend.asp

The History of the Salt Grass Trail Ride
A Local Legacy   
You might not think that an 88-year-old woman could handle a 70-mile trail ride, but that's exactly what Atha Marks Dimon did in 1999 during the Salt Grass Trail Ride in Texas.
By going on the ride Atha was following in her father's footsteps many years earlier. In the 19th century, pioneer cattlemen herded their cattle to Houston up from the salt grass pastures on the Gulf Coast of Texas, where their cattle had been grazing and fattening up. Times change, and since 1900, cattlemen have not needed to herd their cattle across the open land; instead they use trains.

In 1952, four old-time cowmen decided to stage a re-enactment and joined a group of people on the first Salt Grass Trail Ride. One of those four cowmen was E.H. Marks. In 1999, Marks's daughter, Atha Marks Dimon (at the age of 88), her daughter Athene, her grandson Boyd Vaughan, and great-grandson Reagan Vaughan, rode the Salt Grass Trail -- 70 miles from Brenham to Houston -- in memory of the original cattlemen.

The people that have gone on the trail ride include bankers, fire fighters, even middle school students. The trail ride has caught on, and now more than 6,000 riders participate. http://www.americaslibrary.gov/es/tx/es_tx_trail_1.html

The first Saltgrass Steak House opened in March 1991 along the Katy Freeway (I-10) in Houston.[3] It sits along the historic trail where cattle herders would drive their livestock south to graze on the salt grasses of the Texas Gulf Coast. Every year, as team of riders travel the trail before the opening of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo they pass by the original restaurant.[4]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltgrass_Steak_House

Now we all know more than we ever wanted to know.  



That works.

All this talk about steakhouses...may have to go to Saltgrass for lunch since today it is only a couple miles away....

« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 09:10:28 am by heironymouspasparagus » Logged

"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

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« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2018, 09:16:43 am »

Funny, we see more and more people hawking CBD oils, creams, lotions, and other products claimed to have CBD in them around New Mexico.  I hope they go the route of Colorado sooner rather than later to fully legalize it for recreational use.  Then we could have the Hempgrass Steakhouse chain and the signature dessert will be our brownies!

Curious on your thoughts about how a statewide vote in NM would go on that.   Up where you are, in the Alburquerque-Raton-Farmington triangle (which is sort of Colorado South), I'm sure recreational use would pass easily.  Not sure about the rest of the state.

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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2018, 09:49:45 am »

Curious on your thoughts about how a statewide vote in NM would go on that.   Up where you are, in the Alburquerque-Raton-Farmington triangle (which is sort of Colorado South), I'm sure recreational use would pass easily.  Not sure about the rest of the state.



Most people in NM lives in that area... Around 1.2 million of the 2 million inhabitants. It seems like that should easily pass.
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dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #19 on: February 08, 2018, 10:37:20 am »

Most people in NM lives in that area... Around 1.2 million of the 2 million inhabitants. It seems like that should easily pass.


Just got me thinking about that. Here's a 2010 Census map of population per square mile. It's more concentrated than I thought. (found a newer one)

« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 10:40:04 am by dbacksfan 2.0 » Logged
swake
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« Reply #20 on: February 08, 2018, 10:59:16 am »

The "Salt" in Saltgrass gives me pause.  From a branding standpoint, "Switchgrass", "Sawgrass", or even "Tallgrass" (RIP) give a better connotation to me.  Overly salty beef doesn't sound appealing to me.

Salt is the main reason Outback exists. I've never understood it.
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« Reply #21 on: February 08, 2018, 11:17:25 am »

Most people in NM lives in that area... Around 1.2 million of the 2 million inhabitants. It seems like that should easily pass.

I'd think so.  I think it will come down to "mountain people versus flatlanders".   And even down South, there's the Ruidoso and Roswell areas, which are full of interesting folk.   
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #22 on: February 08, 2018, 11:24:49 am »

Just got me thinking about that. Here's a 2010 Census map of population per square mile. It's more concentrated than I thought. (found a newer one)



Notice that the 2nd bar is 1 to 10 per square mile to show how the vast majority of NM is extremely sparsely populated. Only a small tiny fraction of the state has more than 100 per square mile (which you could pretty much fit into ABQ's county).

Compare that to Oklahoma's where quite a large percentage has 100+ per square mile and mainly just the NW is sparsely populated. And Oklahoma is a relatively low population-density state.
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dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #23 on: February 08, 2018, 11:44:13 am »

Notice that the 2nd bar is 1 to 10 per square mile to show how the vast majority of NM is extremely sparsely populated. Only a small tiny fraction of the state has more than 100 per square mile (which you could pretty much fit into ABQ's county).

Compare that to Oklahoma's where quite a large percentage has 100+ per square mile and mainly just the NW is sparsely populated. And Oklahoma is a relatively low population-density state.


And most of the reason for the dispersion of population in OK is agriculturally based with some manufacturing, and I would think that most of the central plains states would be similar. I just thought there were more people in southern NM, not necessarily as concentrated in five or six small areas.
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Conan71
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« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2018, 12:05:26 pm »


Let me know...will be out for a few days...!!   (Weeks..??)





Trinidad is only 50 miles away.  Get a sex change and all the weed/weed products you want.
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Conan71
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« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2018, 12:07:56 pm »

Curious on your thoughts about how a statewide vote in NM would go on that.   Up where you are, in the Alburquerque-Raton-Farmington triangle (which is sort of Colorado South), I'm sure recreational use would pass easily.  Not sure about the rest of the state.



Colfax County were we live is pretty conservative.  I would assume ABQ, SF, Taos, and other larger urban areas would carry it.  I'm not currently aware of a pending referendum on it, but I would think it is not far off.  We do have medical MJ here, apparently though I'm not really sure how it works and you don't hear about pot busts in our are but again, I would have no idea if anyone is cultivating or not.  It's just not something we see, smell, or hear of around here.
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« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2018, 12:24:42 pm »

Colfax County were we live is pretty conservative.  I would assume ABQ, SF, Taos, and other larger urban areas would carry it.  I'm not currently aware of a pending referendum on it, but I would think it is not far off.  We do have medical MJ here, apparently though I'm not really sure how it works and you don't hear about pot busts in our are but again, I would have no idea if anyone is cultivating or not.  It's just not something we see, smell, or hear of around here.

That illustrates my "mountain vs plains" theory.   Cimarron I could see being conservative.  But I'd be curious how Eagle Nest votes. I'm sure there's a few latent hippies hanging out there.
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2018, 02:21:41 pm »

Trinidad is only 50 miles away.  Get a sex change and all the weed/weed products you want.



Lol...will pass on that, but would check out the steakhouse and their signature dessert - brownies!!

Got some friends...will pass along the word about Trinidad.

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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I donít share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
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