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October 19, 2018, 01:26:14 pm
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Author Topic: Two more new brewers in the region (NE Oklahoma)  (Read 1261 times)
Conan71
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« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2018, 03:16:13 pm »

There are a lot of people who think they are going to make a bunch of money starting a brewery. That might have been true a few years ago. They are in for a rude awakening if they plan to be more than a bar that makes their own beer. Heirloom is the best new brewery by far.

Going into mass distribution now vs. five years ago would be difficult.  Wandering through liquor stores in Colorado, New Mexico, and when I'm back in Tulsa, I almost get a headache from all the visual stimuli of the variety of craft beers available.  I've gotten to a point it's pretty hard to discern much difference between one major micro-brewery's beers over another's. (i.e. Sierra Nevada over O'Dell, Left Hand, or New Belgium).  They all offer stouts, lagers, brown ales, and IPA's with very little difference other than the label.  I've got some go-to beers I buy when I'm in the mood for craft beer, I rarely try anything new these days with the exception of having a pint or flight at a brewery we've not been to before.  There are a few micros in mass distribution that I think stand out from the rest but it's a crowded market with maybe too many choices.  I would hate to try and merchandise a liquor store these days much less try to be a brewery breaking into the outside distribution market.

If the model is on-site distribution (pints & growlers) as long as you have an inviting atmosphere and good beer I think you can still do pretty well.  Put it in an area where there is not another brewery and you've just created a social hub.  If you have outstanding food or apps to go with the beer, that much better to draw a crowd and add another profit center.  I don't know at what point you call Tulsa a "crowded" market, I guess that remains to be seen who is still in business five years from now.  If there are 20 breweries and they are all doing well, it's still not crowded.

I always thought Stroud would be a good opportunity for a brewery, 1/2 way between the two largest distribution markets in Oklahoma plus the tourism traffic along Route 66.  But go back to my point about trying to get into mass distribution these days...
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2018, 05:01:03 pm »

Going into mass distribution now vs. five years ago would be difficult.  Wandering through liquor stores in Colorado, New Mexico, and when I'm back in Tulsa, I almost get a headache from all the visual stimuli of the variety of craft beers available.  I've gotten to a point it's pretty hard to discern much difference between one major micro-brewery's beers over another's. (i.e. Sierra Nevada over O'Dell, Left Hand, or New Belgium).  They all offer stouts, lagers, brown ales, and IPA's with very little difference other than the label.  I've got some go-to beers I buy when I'm in the mood for craft beer, I rarely try anything new these days with the exception of having a pint or flight at a brewery we've not been to before.  There are a few micros in mass distribution that I think stand out from the rest but it's a crowded market with maybe too many choices.  I would hate to try and merchandise a liquor store these days much less try to be a brewery breaking into the outside distribution market.

If the model is on-site distribution (pints & growlers) as long as you have an inviting atmosphere and good beer I think you can still do pretty well.  Put it in an area where there is not another brewery and you've just created a social hub.  If you have outstanding food or apps to go with the beer, that much better to draw a crowd and add another profit center.  I don't know at what point you call Tulsa a "crowded" market, I guess that remains to be seen who is still in business five years from now.  If there are 20 breweries and they are all doing well, it's still not crowded.

I always thought Stroud would be a good opportunity for a brewery, 1/2 way between the two largest distribution markets in Oklahoma plus the tourism traffic along Route 66.  But go back to my point about trying to get into mass distribution these days...


There is a big empty concrete slab in Stroud waiting for something to be built there.



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Conan71
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« Reply #17 on: January 12, 2018, 12:24:21 am »


There is a big empty concrete slab in Stroud waiting for something to be built there.


I actually had a "conversational" offer from a cheese plant in the industrial park to co-locate with them at one point.  It wasn't very long after that we found our B & B out in NM so I lost interest in being the one to plant a brewery there.
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2018, 08:45:54 am »

I actually had a "conversational" offer from a cheese plant in the industrial park to co-locate with them at one point.  It wasn't very long after that we found our B & B out in NM so I lost interest in being the one to plant a brewery there.


Breweries always seem to have a pleasant 'yeasty' aroma around them that tends to draw me in even though I am not that big a fan of beer.  Always like to have a meal in that environment with that background smell.

Cheese plants I have been to in the past, from Borden's in Tulsa (another age indicator) to several in Wisconsin and Michigan, don't complement that at all.  Invariably they have been some of the worst smells I have encountered - much worse that the biggest sewage treatment plants in the country!

I suspect it is a good thing you didn't mix those together...

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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I don’t share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
BKDotCom
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« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2018, 08:52:01 am »

Anyone have an up-to-date list of all the local brewers?
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2018, 09:02:34 am »

Renaissance Brewing (12th and Lewis, Tulsa) - http://www.renaissancebeer.com

Fat Toad Brewing (Pryor, 3986 W. 530 Road -- near the Mid America Industrial Park) - https://www.facebook.com/Fat-Toad-Brewing-Company-1757403584547416 (they don't appear to have a website of their own just yet).

I'm pleased to see how many new breweries are opening in the area; I fear though at some point there will be a point of critical mass if it keeps going and some of these may not last long.  The good ones like Marshall, Dead Armadillo and American Solera will likely do just fine, but I hope the newer ones can carve out a niche for themselves and be as popular as they need to be to remain viable.  I've visted Cabin Boys (very good selection) and Heirloom Rustic (kind of eclectic but their beers are quite good also).  Going back to Heirloom Rustic today.

We already had a post about all the new breweries in Tulsa including Renaissance (which has been planned for 3+ years):
http://www.tulsanow.org/forum/index.php?topic=21475.0

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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2018, 09:18:32 am »

Anyone have an up-to-date list of all the local brewers?

Crazy that now there are ~13 breweries/taprooms planned or open within a couple miles of downtown. All in an easily bicyclable-path. In the Pearl District, there will be 5-6+.

Here is an updated list of all breweries/brewpubs existing or planned in midtown/downtown:

1. Marshall (618 S Wheeling Ave) - currently open with potential expansion at 1742 E 6th st

2. Dead Armadillo (1004 E 4th St) - currently open

2.a Dead Armadillo taproom & restaurant at Tulsa International Airport - currently open

3. Prairie Brew Pub (223 N Main St) - currently open

4. Elgin Park Brewpub (325 E Mathew B. Brady St) - currently open

5. Cabin Boys (1717 E 7th St) - Pearl District - currently open

6. Renaissance (1147 S Lewis Ave) - under construction - now (finally) open

7. Taproom for American Solera (108 E 18 ST S) - Chase Healey who founded Prairie Artisan Ales - potentially with small-batch brewing (Existing brewery open on west 21st) - currently open

8. Heirloom Rustic Ales (2113 E. Admiral Blvd.) - Kendall-Whittier - under construction - currently open

9. Welltown Brewery (114 W Archer St) - corner of Cheyenne & Archer - to open soon

10. Nothing's Left Brewing (1501 E. Sixth St.) - plan to open March 2018 (They have redone exterior and looks like making progress inside also)

11. Willow Family Ales (418 S Peoria Ave) - at former Park in the Pearl - under construction (Looks like it hasn't changed much outside lately)

12. Hanson (302 N Boston Ave) - brewery across from Prairie brewpub - last heard it was in planning with pretty far out date (2018/2019)

13. Fine Fermentations (4th and Frankfurt)

I ordered them by opening date (or by estimated open date) as best as I could.

Other breweries planning to open in Tulsa area: FAIK (Far As I Know), Kolibri and Indian Brewing Company at 333 W Dallas St Broken Arrow. Also: High Gravity Homebrewing & Winemaking Supplies & Taproom (6808 S. Memorial) - currently open

Other brewpubs in Tulsa area: Bricktown Brewery (Owasso, Brookside & South Tulsa)

Excluding the Bricktown Brewery locations, that's a total of 17 places built or planned where you can buy beer straight from the source in the Tulsa area. 4 years ago there were zero.


Also related, Red Fork Distillery is going to open at 3310 Southwest Blvd and Oklahoma Distilling Co. is going to open at 1724 E. Seventh St, right across from Cabin Boys and Marshall.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 09:20:08 am by TulsaGoldenHurriCAN » Logged
TylerBGoode
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« Reply #22 on: January 12, 2018, 10:09:47 am »

Any idea who far out the distilleries are from opening? I haven't heard much on that front.
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