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August 15, 2018, 10:28:00 pm
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Author Topic: Office-retail development across from Utica Square at old Goldie's location  (Read 1197 times)
heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2018, 11:17:47 am »

I can see how people don't like the over use of that style, but it can look better than most buildings when done right. At its worst, it can be terrible, but these 2 above examples are not that.

Here are a couple faux Italian buildings that are awful and give the style a bad name:



We seem to be getting a significant selection of Italianate type buildings in midtown.  3 of those were just wrong, but the one with the swimming pool seemed about as authentic as anything else done in this country, given the realities of building for office, retail, hotel, etc, in the area...well, except for the pool..!   I got a feeling that a lot of what we look at and see as "Tuscan" from the old world is either incomplete - as they ran out of money to finish the building, or worn such that the outer stucco layer has come off, leaving the stones/bricks exposed the building is made from.

This design looks like it would fit in well enough and not be a detriment to the area, though...  Just my thoughts...

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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I donít share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2018, 11:33:01 am »


We seem to be getting a significant selection of Italianate type buildings in midtown.  3 of those were just wrong, but the one with the swimming pool seemed about as authentic as anything else done in this country, given the realities of building for office, retail, hotel, etc, in the area...well, except for the pool..!   I got a feeling that a lot of what we look at and see as "Tuscan" from the old world is either incomplete - as they ran out of money to finish the building, or worn such that the outer stucco layer has come off, leaving the stones/bricks exposed the building is made from.

This design looks like it would fit in well enough and not be a detriment to the area, though...  Just my thoughts...




I love the Mediterranean look when done well but you're right that one with the pool is pretty typical of when that look is attempted in the US. It is better than those others and better than a generic apartment complex, but certainly not a remarkable piece of architecture and I can see why many would dislike it.

This new building seems pretty well designed and will fit in with other new buildings. Not stunningly beautiful or remarkable, but very nice.
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« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2018, 01:47:48 pm »


I love the Mediterranean look when done well but you're right that one with the pool is pretty typical of when that look is attempted in the US. It is better than those others and better than a generic apartment complex, but certainly not a remarkable piece of architecture and I can see why many would dislike it.

This new building seems pretty well designed and will fit in with other new buildings. Not stunningly beautiful or remarkable, but very nice.

For better or worse it has become sort of a trademark of midtown architecture, which I assume ties back to Philbrook.  I honestly like the style and hope more of the infill around Utica Square looks similar.  Similar to the "white district" that formed around 35th & Peoria it can create a defining look for a particular area.
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