A grassroots organization focused on the intelligent and sustainable development, preservation and revitalization of Tulsa.
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
September 27, 2020, 08:19:42 pm
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Protected bike lanes coming to downtown  (Read 12145 times)
buffalodan
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 55


« Reply #30 on: January 16, 2020, 11:11:48 am »

We've been designing a lot of campuses around the country, and they are all trying to figure out what the next 5 years will even bring. This is a great concept, but it really just harks back to that the city needs to have at least one person that is keeping their pulse on trends. Scooters didn't start in Tulsa. We all knew that they were coming, just that the city didn't have a method to respond to them in the time it took them to go from LA to Tulsa. The "next thing" is going to be the same. Whether that is drone delivery, driverless cars, or some new segway, the city needs to be thinking about how it can be nimble and prevent those things from coming in and causing the bad type of mayhem.

I would say that I would like to hear how the city wants to be at the front of that, but I don't see us doing that. So lets go for at least learning from others.

As for the bike lanes, I think it is an important step. Providing space for bikes/scooters/etc lets them know that the city is starting to think of them. At the end of the day, the safest bike places tend to be areas where bikes are common. So that should be a big part of the goal.
Logged
Conan71
Recovering Republican
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 29324



« Reply #31 on: February 04, 2020, 07:12:08 pm »


As for the bike lanes, I think it is an important step. Providing space for bikes/scooters/etc lets them know that the city is starting to think of them. At the end of the day, the safest bike places tend to be areas where bikes are common. So that should be a big part of the goal.


If we are satisfied that "a start is a start" then mission accomplished.  Getting inexperienced cyclists over a false sense of security is imperative.  I do appreciate your comment about safest places for bikes are where they are common.  If motorists are used to the idea they will see more cyclists in the downtown or near downtown areas with them on the road, perhaps they will become more aware.

Still there's a need to better educate motorists on sharing the road and the rights of slower moving vehicles.  Far too many motorists still view cyclists with disdain as a slow moving object making them 30 seconds late for their next appointment instead of a fellow human making way with their own vehicle.
Logged

"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
Hoss
I'm a Daft Punk
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 11245


I might be moving to Montana soon...


WWW
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2020, 08:20:34 am »

If we are satisfied that "a start is a start" then mission accomplished.  Getting inexperienced cyclists over a false sense of security is imperative.  I do appreciate your comment about safest places for bikes are where they are common.  If motorists are used to the idea they will see more cyclists in the downtown or near downtown areas with them on the road, perhaps they will become more aware.

Still there's a need to better educate motorists on sharing the road and the rights of slower moving vehicles.  Far too many motorists still view cyclists with disdain as a slow moving object making them 30 seconds late for their next appointment instead of a fellow human making way with their own vehicle.

I think the newly created bike lanes along both directions of 11th Street between Mingo and Memorial is a good example of bad design.  Previously, this stretch of 11th was three lanes each way, and mainly the right most lane was used for off-laning to a right turn (I live up the street from Eastwood Baptist Church on 91st and see this first hand).  Construction has been constant in this area for the last two years and can be annoying but obviously understand the need.  I am happy, however, about the city putting up a traffic light at the intersection of 11th and 89th East Ave.  That intersection is usually pretty docile, except for when children are being dropped off and picked up at Lindbergh Elementary and then people lose their minds.  When the traffic is docile, the light along 11th Street usually stays green, only until cross traffic on 89th is detected will it change.  The lights appear to change to cyclic during the heavy times (8 to 9am, 2:30 to 3:30 pm).  So the bike lanes always make me double check that when I'm turning north on 91st, I'm not turning into some poor cyclist who is not paying attention.
Logged

Libertarianism is a system of beliefs for people who think adolescence is the epitome of human achievement.

Global warming isn't real because it was cold today.  Also great news: world famine is over because I just ate - Stephen Colbert.

Somebody find Guido an ambulance to chase...
Ed W
City Father
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2940



« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2020, 02:11:29 pm »

It would benefit us if the city looked at what works or doesn't work in other places like NYC, Seattle, Portland, etc. It would also benefit if genuinely experienced cyclists had real input into design considerations.
Logged

Ed

May you live in interesting times.
buffalodan
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 55


« Reply #34 on: February 18, 2020, 11:02:10 am »

https://www.cityoftulsa.org/media/12210/1117.pdf

So this is bike lanes going on 11th from all the way from Lewis to 129th and on Pine from Gilcrease to Memorial. As well as Main St from Haskell North to Pine. I'm not sure why they started at Haskell and didn't start further south.

I wasn't able to find the books on this, so I'm not sure when this will get done. BUT I can't imagine this going into 2021, and could see it getting done by the end of summer. Really just depends on when they are able to get started.

This is two really large E-W streets getting huge sections of bike infrastructure that will be able to get people on bikes ALMOST downtown.
Logged
Urban Enthusiast
Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 39


« Reply #35 on: February 18, 2020, 05:14:53 pm »

https://www.cityoftulsa.org/media/12210/1117.pdf

So this is bike lanes going on 11th from all the way from Lewis to 129th and on Pine from Gilcrease to Memorial. As well as Main St from Haskell North to Pine. I'm not sure why they started at Haskell and didn't start further south.

I wasn't able to find the books on this, so I'm not sure when this will get done. BUT I can't imagine this going into 2021, and could see it getting done by the end of summer. Really just depends on when they are able to get started.

This is two really large E-W streets getting huge sections of bike infrastructure that will be able to get people on bikes ALMOST downtown.

They have already installed a bike lane on Boulder from Archer (where it ties into an exiting bike lane) north to Haskell Street where it ties into Main Street and then it runs north to Haskell Pl.  I imagine they are just continuing it from Haskell Pl north to Pine. 
Logged
buffalodan
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 55


« Reply #36 on: February 19, 2020, 03:46:31 pm »

They have already installed a bike lane on Boulder from Archer (where it ties into an exiting bike lane) north to Haskell Street where it ties into Main Street and then it runs north to Haskell Pl.  I imagine they are just continuing it from Haskell Pl north to Pine. 

Ahh, that makes sense. I was curious how they were going to take it down main. Didn't even think of the new Boulder bike lanes going north past the railroad tracks.
Logged
Conan71
Recovering Republican
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 29324



« Reply #37 on: March 04, 2020, 10:53:04 pm »

It would benefit us if the city looked at what works or doesn't work in other places like NYC, Seattle, Portland, etc. It would also benefit if genuinely experienced cyclists had real input into design considerations.

You mean instead of well-intentioned egg-heads at INCOG who are infrequent cyclists?  Sorry, I don't mean to be offensive as I know a few INCOG types who contribute here every now and then.  Urban bike lanes just never seem like they were thought out by people with a real fear of being run over by a two ton opponent on the road.
Logged

"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
heironymouspasparagus
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12693



« Reply #38 on: April 04, 2020, 01:37:28 pm »

You mean instead of well-intentioned egg-heads at INCOG who are infrequent cyclists?  Sorry, I don't mean to be offensive as I know a few INCOG types who contribute here every now and then.  Urban bike lanes just never seem like they were thought out by people with a real fear of being run over by a two ton opponent on the road.


I can be offensive for you if you like...!   

If they contribute here, why don't they contribute where it would do some real good - at the INCOG events, where something real could be done to protect and encourage bicycling?   

Or conversely, if the contributions here are as trivial as what happens at INCOG, why do they bother?



Logged

"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I don’t share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
tulsabug
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 87


WWW
« Reply #39 on: July 08, 2020, 09:08:06 am »

As an owner of a building on 11th, lemme say right now that knocking 11th down to 2 lanes is a terrible idea no matter the benefits of adding bike lanes. The amount of traffic on 11th is crazy already especially people going to or leaving downtown for work. Even worse, many of the businesses receive freight shipments in the street (the used car lots here often have giant car haulers blocking a lane while they unload cars) and that isn't going to stop since for many places there are no other options. We're lucky enough to have a parking lot behind our building for receiving but most buildings on 11th aren't set up like this. And, what I've already seen is people using the bike lane as a turning lane, or when someone is turning into a business or side street from the inside lane now, going into the bike lane to go around the car. I imagine if the three people (not being sarcastic) who ride bikes on 11th want to tempt death they'll give the bike lanes a go but otherwise I'm sure they'll stay on the sidewalks.
Logged

 
Ed W
City Father
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2940



« Reply #40 on: July 08, 2020, 02:43:42 pm »

As an owner of a building on 11th, lemme say right now that knocking 11th down to 2 lanes is a terrible idea no matter the benefits of adding bike lanes. The amount of traffic on 11th is crazy already especially people going to or leaving downtown for work. Even worse, many of the businesses receive freight shipments in the street (the used car lots here often have giant car haulers blocking a lane while they unload cars) and that isn't going to stop since for many places there are no other options. We're lucky enough to have a parking lot behind our building for receiving but most buildings on 11th aren't set up like this. And, what I've already seen is people using the bike lane as a turning lane, or when someone is turning into a business or side street from the inside lane now, going into the bike lane to go around the car. I imagine if the three people (not being sarcastic) who ride bikes on 11th want to tempt death they'll give the bike lanes a go but otherwise I'm sure they'll stay on the sidewalks.
Logged

Ed

May you live in interesting times.
918superboy
Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #41 on: September 26, 2020, 03:24:50 pm »

I think the bike lanes have been a huge benefit to 11th and that comes from someone who has lived and driven on 11th everyday for several years, it's a much less stressful driving experience now. And I've noticed an increase in cyclists which is awesome.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
  Hosted by TulsaConnect and Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
 

Mission

 

"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
more...

 

Contact

 

2210 S Main St.
Tulsa, OK 74114
(918) 409-2669
info@tulsanow.org