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July 22, 2019, 09:52:22 am
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Author Topic: Completeing the Gilcrease Hills expressway  (Read 14904 times)
SXSW
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« Reply #60 on: November 20, 2018, 10:10:23 pm »

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Building the five-mile, four-lane extension would leave only the stretch from Edison Street to the Tisdale Expressway to be completed in northwest Tulsa.

This seems like it would be a challenging stretch to build with the terrain in that area.  What are the odds this part doesn’t get built?
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Conan71
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« Reply #61 on: November 21, 2018, 05:25:43 pm »

So is this just this leg and doesn’t include connecting it to the existing highway north of 412?




I'm failing to see the cost benefit of this, even for W. 21st st. industry.  I-244 ostensibly was aligned the way it was with its exits to help link those businesses as well as the rail yards to the Interstate system.   
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ELG4America
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« Reply #62 on: December 14, 2018, 09:25:03 am »

I would argue that the long term benefit of completing this loop is pushing traffic out from our city center. The more we can loop pass-through traffic around the edges of the city the more likely we can eventually reclaim land in our city center for development.
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Rattle Trap
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« Reply #63 on: December 14, 2018, 09:50:58 am »

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I would argue that the long term benefit of completing this loop is pushing traffic out from our city center. The more we can loop pass-through traffic around the edges of the city the more likely we can eventually reclaim land in our city center for development.

I mostly agree. I see the criticism that there is no real need for this to be done now, given the part of town it's in, but city planning is about preparing for future growth and staying ahead of the problems, right? The city and state needs to be proactive rather than reactive to the increasing traffic in our cities.

I grew up in Owasso, graduated high school there, and am moving back post college. I've seen the town grow from a population of 10k-15k, to pushing 40k now. The main roads the town is centered are all behind the times and should have been expanded at least a decade ago. For some reason they decided to only expand 169 up to bird creek, which solved literally nothing in regards to traffic coming into town. We probably won't see a real 169 expansion for at least another decade.

I also think of OKC's current state in that there apparently was no thought put in to highway expansions over their last 20 years of growth they've seen. Now they have a huge back log of road projects and terrible traffic for a metro of "only" 1.5 million.

A good example of something proactive being done is the expansion of Turner Turnpike. We don't necessarily NEED it to be 6 lanes right now, but by the time they expand the entire stretch from Tulsa to OKC, we probably will. Or maybe they just want a reason to hike the toll again...who knows.

I guess my point is that I'm good with doing this project before we....really need it? lol
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patric
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« Reply #64 on: December 14, 2018, 11:42:49 am »


A good example of something proactive being done is the expansion of Turner Turnpike. We don't necessarily NEED it to be 6 lanes right now, but by the time they expand the entire stretch from Tulsa to OKC, we probably will. Or maybe they just want a reason to hike the toll again...who knows.


We wouldnt know what to do with a toll hike that wasnt backdoor funding for the Department of Public Safety.

So when does motor vehicle use plateau?  Probably not for a long time, but at some point in our lifetimes we are likely to come to the conclusion we have too many 6-8-12-lane roads.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2018, 11:47:50 am by patric » Logged

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