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November 14, 2019, 05:28:53 pm
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Author Topic: AEP considers burying lines  (Read 20889 times)
heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #105 on: January 14, 2019, 10:52:15 am »

PG&E power lines are found to have caused the Camp Fire and the utility declares bankruptcy.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/14/business/pge-bankruptcy-wildfires/index.html




This is really bad for everyone involved.   

The article mentioned one downed power pole riddled with bullets - I have seen power poles in NE OK that were shot so many times I wondered how they could be standing.  Talk about an easy "terrorist" target...

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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I dont share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
patric
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« Reply #106 on: May 26, 2019, 10:20:59 pm »

This is really bad for everyone involved.   
The article mentioned one downed power pole riddled with bullets - I have seen power poles in NE OK that were shot so many times I wondered how they could be standing.  Talk about an easy "terrorist" target...



Placing power lines underground is an expensive way to reduce fire danger

Experts have said that despite the heavy costs, burying power lines in areas most susceptible to winds would provide a huge margin of safety.
San Diego has been ahead of the curve, placing thousands of miles of power lines underground over the last few decades. Part of the motivation has been aesthetic, clearing ocean views for residents. But it has also helped reduce fire risk.

In 2016, San Diego Gas & Electric began an ambitious plan to make power lines in the Cleveland National Forest more resistant to fire. That included burying 30 miles of lines underground in sensitive areas.

Its almost 18th century technology, in some ways, then-Malibu Mayor Rick Mullen told state lawmakers last year about overhead lines. Lets make the investment to make the system durable.
I hope this is a wake-up [call] to them and other utilities proving that we need to value infrastructure. I just hope this will result in a cultural change for them.
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Red Arrow
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« Reply #107 on: May 27, 2019, 01:20:05 pm »



Placing power lines underground is an expensive way to reduce fire danger

Experts have said that despite the heavy costs, burying power lines in areas most susceptible to winds would provide a huge margin of safety.
San Diego has been ahead of the curve, placing thousands of miles of power lines underground over the last few decades. Part of the motivation has been aesthetic, clearing ocean views for residents. But it has also helped reduce fire risk.

In 2016, San Diego Gas & Electric began an ambitious plan to make power lines in the Cleveland National Forest more resistant to fire. That included burying 30 miles of lines underground in sensitive areas.

Its almost 18th century technology, in some ways, then-Malibu Mayor Rick Mullen told state lawmakers last year about overhead lines. Lets make the investment to make the system durable.
I hope this is a wake-up [call] to them and other utilities proving that we need to value infrastructure. I just hope this will result in a cultural change for them.


Can high voltage main transmission lines be buried?

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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #108 on: May 27, 2019, 06:05:47 pm »

Can high voltage main transmission lines be buried?




Yes.  Very pricey.   Just a question of capital expenditure.  Good time to add wire to reduce power losses, too.


The big transmission line in Broken Arrow (looks like about a 161 kv trunk to me, but not completely sure) went down for about 1/2 mile.  Metal and wood poles.  About 500 ft east of friends in Broken Arrow - we were visiting during that storm and it was a wild ride.  The house across the street, and several others around there, from them lost a tree, and power was out for about 8 hours - they were lucky!  That tornado didn't quite make it all the way to the ground, otherwise, there would have been some serious issues.  As it was, lots of houses damaged, but no one seriously hurt!   Could easily have been a Moore type event - the damage path as it happened was hundreds of feet wide through those neighborhoods from Aspen to Elm!

« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 06:07:33 pm by heironymouspasparagus » Logged

"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I dont share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
patric
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« Reply #109 on: June 05, 2019, 09:13:48 am »

Can high voltage main transmission lines be buried?

Yes.  After the 07/08 ice storm when AEP was asked what it would cost to bury *ALL* lines, the cost of cross-country transmission lines greatly inflated the price tag (when most people anticipated AEP would only focus on distribution lines and "drops" to the homes).

Most of the failures then were aerial lines among the urban tree canopy, even though many simply failed from the weight of ice on the wire alone without the help of any tree limbs. Nevertheless, tree butchering was touted as the solution.

Its interesting to re-read this discussion from the beginning, when AEP made it look like they were champing at the bit to bury lines but were "surprised" and "discouraged" at "discovering" the cost.
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"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
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