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November 20, 2017, 06:02:23 am
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Author Topic: Walkable cities= richer & smarter  (Read 1911 times)
patric
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« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2016, 11:21:27 pm »

Was reading that QT's new downtown Atlanta store design was influenced by the pushback QT got when it fought the Tulsa Form Based Codes.

Well, good for Atlanta for getting the QT that should have been built in the Pearl District.

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"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #16 on: July 16, 2016, 03:00:39 am »

Stanford was founded in 1891. Oklahoma and Oklahoma State were founded in 1890. But the difference with Stanford is , it's a private university where as OU and OSU are state universities. The other thing to remember is, Stanford was founded in what was the Wall Street of the West in the SF Bay Area. The area is more like Manhattan than other city in the US in that it is a major financial area. Stanford was built upon business, engineering, and a research school, and was instrumental in the development of Silicon Valley from having associations with Hewlett/Packard and IBM and had been a technology school since WWII. That area was a pedestrian based/trolley/cable car area before Oklahoma was a state.

As Artist brought up about Tucson, and the same goes for Phoenix, they have invested heavily for decades building infrastructure, and that's why they have/had business like Motorola, Good Year, Honeywell, Boeing, Lockheed, American Express, Bank Of America, Wells Fargo, General Motors, Intel, On Semi Conductors, and ASU and U Of A. They are forward thinking cities, and you will find that they are also walkable cities.
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johrasephoenix
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« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2016, 08:28:57 am »

It's also just plain true that highly educated, high skill knowledge workers strongly prefer walkable, traditional neighborhoods and progressive politics.  My cousin was a senior executive for a mega international real estate developer out of Houston that for many years heavily recruited Ivy League MBAs.  Eventually they had to give up because the ivy leaguers would balk at living in a place like Houston or if they did come, could only stand it for 1-2 years.  Apparently that kind of top-tier global talent just didn't want to be in a sprawling, ugly city like Houston.  Secondary offices in cities like Chicago, Boston, NYC, and recently Austin did not have this problem.
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PonderInc
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« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2016, 09:49:02 pm »

As people realize that walkable neighborhoods are Tulsa's future, I think it won't be long before folks rediscover north Tulsa.  So much potential here, with traditional street grids, small lots and some great architecture!  I get excited because there is SO much potential in north Tulsa, while the southern suburbs are almost beyond repair. Meandering, large lot cul-de-sac neighborhoods seem almost impossible to fix.  One wonders if the suburbs will be abandoned in a future where climate change is taken seriously and the high cost of sprawl is recognized.  Meanwhile, north Tulsa has great bones, established infrastructure, and is just waiting for reinvestment and revitalization.
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Bamboo World
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« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2016, 09:56:48 pm »


...the southern suburbs are almost beyond repair. Meandering, large lot cul-de-sac neighborhoods seem almost impossible to fix...


I agree.  Probably one change that will need to happen is the introduction of accessory dwelling units in the suburbs.  Also, much denser, mixed-use development needs to be allowed along major suburban streets and transit routes.  The cost of fuel is too low for much change now, however.
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rdj
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« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2016, 09:58:21 am »

As people realize that walkable neighborhoods are Tulsa's future, I think it won't be long before folks rediscover north Tulsa.  So much potential here, with traditional street grids, small lots and some great architecture!  I get excited because there is SO much potential in north Tulsa, while the southern suburbs are almost beyond repair. Meandering, large lot cul-de-sac neighborhoods seem almost impossible to fix.  One wonders if the suburbs will be abandoned in a future where climate change is taken seriously and the high cost of sprawl is recognized.  Meanwhile, north Tulsa has great bones, established infrastructure, and is just waiting for reinvestment and revitalization.

The area from the IDL to Apache and MLK to Tisdale is ripe for folks who want walkable neighborhoods.  Not all of the streets have sidewalks, but many do.  Brady Heights has certainly improved and Reservoir Hill is moving along at the same pace as always, about one house redone a year.  If you've never done it take a drive thru the neighborhood south of Apache to about Victoria and west of MLK over to the hill.  You'll think you're in North Florence Park minus the remodels and manicured landscapes.
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cannon_fodder
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« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2016, 12:22:52 pm »

I think the right development in the "empty staircases" section just north of the Brady District could open up all the adjacent areas for a fresh look. Neat areas, close to the "hot" areas, and a true close in urban neighborhood. But, I think a jump start is needed to break the negative stereotypes and get more than the bravest to consider the area. Some of that is warranted, much of it isn't.
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« Reply #22 on: July 21, 2016, 01:27:54 pm »

I think the right development in the "empty staircases" section just north of the Brady District could open up all the adjacent areas for a fresh look. Neat areas, close to the "hot" areas, and a true close in urban neighborhood. But, I think a jump start is needed to break the negative stereotypes and get more than the bravest to consider the area. Some of that is warranted, much of it isn't.

Standpipe Hill?  I thought I read somewhere that land wouldn't be used for development.  Maybe I'm wrong?  I know there's a monument up there now.
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Conan71
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« Reply #23 on: July 21, 2016, 02:02:33 pm »

Between OSU Tulsa and TDA property, don’t hold your breath.
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