A grassroots organization focused on the intelligent and sustainable development, preservation and revitalization of Tulsa.
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 20, 2017, 01:23:36 pm
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Biking in Tulsa  (Read 1695 times)
johrasephoenix
Guest
« on: May 31, 2016, 09:08:43 pm »

I tried to make it from my apartment downtown to 71st and Yale.  It was a pretty scary experience trying to bike along 71st street.  And I'm a very confident cyclist who has ridden for years in Chicago, Boston, and even India.

Is there a reason 71st street needs to be a 7 lane superhighway?  And if it does, why are there no alternative east west ways across Tulsa south of I-44?  There are literally no straight roads to take you from the river to Yale that arent' super high speed.

Anyway, something they should consider fixing if they are serious about this whole bike friendly thing.  You can make downtown as bike friendly as you want but if there's no safe way to bike to downtown then its all kind of a pointless exercise.
Logged
Hoss
I'm a Daft Punk
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 10919


I might be moving to Montana soon...


WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2016, 11:03:35 pm »

Drive 71st from Lewis to 169.  That will answer your question.  I avoid 71st like the plague now.  I rarely get south of 51st unless it's to visit my brother in Broken Arrow.
Logged

Libertarianism is a system of beliefs for people who think adolescence is the epitome of human achievement.

Global warming isn't real because it was cold today.  Also great news: world famine is over because I just ate - Stephen Colbert.

Somebody find Guido an ambulance to chase...
rebound
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 694


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2016, 08:35:41 am »

I tried to make it from my apartment downtown to 71st and Yale.  It was a pretty scary experience trying to bike along 71st street.  And I'm a very confident cyclist who has ridden for years in Chicago, Boston, and even India.

Is there a reason 71st street needs to be a 7 lane superhighway?  And if it does, why are there no alternative east west ways across Tulsa south of I-44?  There are literally no straight roads to take you from the river to Yale that arent' super high speed.

Anyway, something they should consider fixing if they are serious about this whole bike friendly thing.  You can make downtown as bike friendly as you want but if there's no safe way to bike to downtown then its all kind of a pointless exercise.

Have you looked at the INCOG maps:

http://incog.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=2a173b86136c4f96adafb641f5c4cb01

I ride down from 31st and Peoria to a buddy's house close to 71st and Harvard on a regular basis using the bike streets.  It's not the most direct route, but it works well and keeps me out of traffic.  Using those routes, I would think you could get to 71st and Yale and avoid the major arteries.   (Although, North of 71st between Yale and Sheridan is kind of an island.)


 

Logged

 
rebound
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 694


WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2016, 08:44:52 am »

I tried to make it from my apartment downtown to 71st and Yale.  It was a pretty scary experience trying to bike along 71st street.  And I'm a very confident cyclist who has ridden for years in Chicago, Boston, and even India.

Is there a reason 71st street needs to be a 7 lane superhighway?  And if it does, why are there no alternative east west ways across Tulsa south of I-44?  There are literally no straight roads to take you from the river to Yale that arent' super high speed.

Anyway, something they should consider fixing if they are serious about this whole bike friendly thing.  You can make downtown as bike friendly as you want but if there's no safe way to bike to downtown then its all kind of a pointless exercise.

Also,   anytime I'm trying to figure out how to get someplace that is not obvious to me, I check the Strava Heat Maps.  All bike rides on Strava are uploaded and they create maps showing where people ride.   If the route is "hot" it is where a lot of riders ride, and so is probably a good route to go on:

http://labs.strava.com/heatmap/#12/-95.94309/36.05507/blue/bike

Logged

 
Townsend
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12010



« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2016, 11:57:47 am »


Anyway, something they should consider fixing if they are serious about this whole bike friendly thing. 

I'm not trying to be a smartass but who is this "they" you've mentioned?
Logged
dioscorides
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 256



« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2016, 12:20:59 pm »

I tried to make it from my apartment downtown to 71st and Yale.  It was a pretty scary experience trying to bike along 71st street.  And I'm a very confident cyclist who has ridden for years in Chicago, Boston, and even India.

Is there a reason 71st street needs to be a 7 lane superhighway?  And if it does, why are there no alternative east west ways across Tulsa south of I-44?  There are literally no straight roads to take you from the river to Yale that arent' super high speed.

Anyway, something they should consider fixing if they are serious about this whole bike friendly thing.  You can make downtown as bike friendly as you want but if there's no safe way to bike to downtown then its all kind of a pointless exercise.

My wife bikes from our house, just south of downtown, to work, between 61st and 71st and Yale, every once in a while.  She turns off the river trail at 56th, I believe, and uses it to go east.  I think she has to get up to 55th St after she crosses Lewis, in order to get over Joe Creek at Manion Park.  She turns to the south just west of Yale and gets to work through the neighborhood.  I can get the exact route, if you think you want to try it.
Logged

There is an ancient Celtic axiom that says 'Good people drink good beer.' Which is true, then as now. Just look around you in any public barroom and you will quickly see: bad people drink bad beer. Think about it. - Hunter S. Thompson
cannon_fodder
All around good guy.
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 9160



« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2016, 12:50:30 pm »

Great googly moogly! I would never ride on 71st Street. I'm very comfortable riding in traffic... but 71st is hardly car friendly, let alone bike friendly.

Using Strava heat maps is a good review if you don't know the area. Google maps also has a quality mapping tool that uses bike routes and paths. The route from downtown to Woodland Hills using Google makes sense to me looking it over... but for the suicide run down Sheridan. But you can easily modify the route:

I would probably ride this route. It utilizes bike route (share the road) fairly heavily and avoids major streets.

An alternative route heavily utilizes the Riverside and Creek bike paths. You then have to weave your way through the Best Buy parking lot and behind Union to come into Woodland Hills without the eminent threat of death, but it is a fairly decent route. If you want to use the paths, this is the way to go for sure. Might be a better ride than the one I'd take, but not nearly as direct.

71st is a lousy bike route. It isn't pedestrian friendly in the slightest either. Its the kind of place that you get in your car to go to the next store over.
Logged

- - - - - - - - -
I crush grooves.
johrasephoenix
Guest
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2016, 01:07:17 pm »

"They" is the Great Mysterious Powers That Be. 


I don't think they have an email address.

Logged
Conan71
Recovering Republican
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 28714



« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2016, 01:29:48 pm »

My wife bikes from our house, just south of downtown, to work, between 61st and 71st and Yale, every once in a while.  She turns off the river trail at 56th, I believe, and uses it to go east.  I think she has to get up to 55th St after she crosses Lewis, in order to get over Joe Creek at Manion Park.  She turns to the south just west of Yale and gets to work through the neighborhood.  I can get the exact route, if you think you want to try it.

I’ve taken that same route before, works great.  You can turn south from 56th at New Haven, Marion, or Urbana and cross from there and pick up the road to the west of Kirk Of The Hills further South.
Logged

"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
Townsend
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12010



« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2016, 01:36:43 pm »

"They" is the Great Mysterious Powers That Be. 


I don't think they have an email address.

Ah...yeah, I believe "They" moved to Portland.

Those that are left own asphalt companies and have strong tree pollen allergies.
Logged
davideinstein
Guest
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2016, 03:48:20 pm »

We should do a critical mass on 71st.
Logged
PonderInc
City Dweller
City Father
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2459


« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2016, 04:07:51 pm »

71st street fascinates me because the lanes appear to be at least 15' wide.  All you'd have to do is shrink these to 11' and you'd have oodles of room to create protected bike lanes along several miles of this street.  I was just thinking about this the other day, when I noticed that you could almost fit two cars side by side in a single lane. (I'm exaggerating, but not much.)

This would also help the pedestrian experience, since the sidewalks directly abut this superhighway.  Ugh!  Terrifying just to walk on these sidewalks with cars roaring by your shoulder! 

Logged
cannon_fodder
All around good guy.
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 9160



« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2016, 07:43:01 am »

71st street fascinates me because the lanes appear to be at least 15' wide.

I agree with your sentiment, but measuring the lanes on Google Earth shows the each direction is allotted 37' with no true shoulders. The lanes are 12' lanes.  You could squeeze what I call a "Florida style bike lane" in, which is basically a 3' shoulder they call a bike lane.

But I sure wouldn't want to use that: if I'm riding down the middle, my handle bars are within 6" of the end of my lane. Meaning many, many cars would zoom past me within 6" at 50 mph.

71st is designed to be a freeway. 12' lanes, straight, and many lanes. I'm afraid you can't make a freeway pedestrian or biker friendly without major renovations (like the bike path set back from the Creek).
Logged

- - - - - - - - -
I crush grooves.
Red Arrow
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 10232


WWW
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2016, 09:42:09 pm »

71st street fascinates me because the lanes appear to be at least 15' wide.  All you'd have to do is shrink these to 11' and you'd have oodles of room to create protected bike lanes along several miles of this street.  I was just thinking about this the other day, when I noticed that you could almost fit two cars side by side in a single lane. (I'm exaggerating, but not much.)

This would also help the pedestrian experience, since the sidewalks directly abut this superhighway.  Ugh!  Terrifying just to walk on these sidewalks with cars roaring by your shoulder! 


Like it or not, there will be some totally pedestrian and bicycle unfriendly roads in Tulsa.  71st is one of them
Logged

 
Red Arrow
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 10232


WWW
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2016, 09:58:14 pm »

71st street fascinates me because the lanes appear to be at least 15' wide.  All you'd have to do is shrink these to 11' and you'd have oodles of room to create protected bike lanes along several miles of this street.  I was just thinking about this the other day, when I noticed that you could almost fit two cars side by side in a single lane. (I'm exaggerating, but not much.)

This would also help the pedestrian experience, since the sidewalks directly abut this superhighway.  Ugh!  Terrifying just to walk on these sidewalks with cars roaring by your shoulder! 



It appears that the picture was taken by the driver of a vehicle.  Shame on the picture taker for not being a driver first and a photographer second.
Logged

 
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
  Hosted by TulsaConnect and Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
 

Mission

 

"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
more...

 

Contact

 

2210 S Main St.
Tulsa, OK 74114
(918) 409-2669
info@tulsanow.org