A grassroots organization focused on the intelligent and sustainable development, preservation and revitalization of Tulsa.
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 20, 2017, 06:04:03 am
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 11TH ST DEVELOPMENT  (Read 6475 times)
Markk
Civic Leader
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 269



« Reply #45 on: July 26, 2017, 06:22:35 pm »

this sounds great, but is it meant to be more a farmer's market kind of space or touristy/restaurant space?

There's a place that sounds like this in Little Rock by the Clinton Library.  I like the idea, but I'm wondering if this is putting the cart before horse?  There's really no destination nearby to attract people; but I sure hope this would serve as destination to spur other development.
Logged
RecycleMichael
truth teller
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12861


« Reply #46 on: July 26, 2017, 09:55:45 pm »

A year round permanent farmers market will succeed. Vendors and customers will appreciate the regularity of open every day with the feel of all local and fresh.
Logged

Power is nothing till you use it.
Conan71
Recovering Republican
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 28709



« Reply #47 on: July 26, 2017, 10:14:11 pm »

There's a place that sounds like this in Little Rock by the Clinton Library.  I like the idea, but I'm wondering if this is putting the cart before horse?  There's really no destination nearby to attract people; but I sure hope this would serve as destination to spur other development.

Between this and Renaissance Brewery, it will be a pretty nice jump-start for the area.
Logged

"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 601



« Reply #48 on: July 27, 2017, 07:31:22 am »

Between this and Renaissance Brewery, it will be a pretty nice jump-start for the area.

There's also Fuel 66 which has really grown to be a destination place with big crowds pretty often along with 918 Coffee which is a nice coffee place and then Starship. There's quite a lot of traffic and business going on along 11th street around there. That particular building hasn't had lots of traffic simply because it has been headquarters for the Loebuck Taylor Foundation which is funding this.
Logged
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 601



« Reply #49 on: July 27, 2017, 07:46:41 am »

There's a place that sounds like this in Little Rock by the Clinton Library.  I like the idea, but I'm wondering if this is putting the cart before horse?  There's really no destination nearby to attract people; but I sure hope this would serve as destination to spur other development.

This area isn't that remote. It is 3-4 blocks from Reasors at 15th and a block from Perry's Deli & Meats (and a bunch of stuff down that direction like the booming Whittier District) and close to Marshall Brewery and another brewery or two going in. It is also in the highest populated zip code in Oklahoma (74104). Renaissance neighborhood is full of the kinds of people who like and support these kinds of developments. The neighborhood association was founded to purchase Campbell Hotel to save it and they have helped to spurn lots of growth along 11th street. There's also the welding school which brings in constant traffic and the Hookah lounge which helps with late night food crowd.

The LTFF is also planning a mixed-use urban development right across the street all the way from the brewery to Advance Auto. They razed the buildings last year but still haven't started construction. I hope that is still in the cards and that this farmers market is in addition to those plans.

If that gets built along with the farmers market "mall", it will completely change that street and help build more of a bridge between Cherry St and TU.

LA has a "Grand Central Market" with lots of small kiosks of different vendors which is really neat that was put in a seedy area of downtown and has seemingly thrived. I think this could do very well with the support of LTFF and some time to pick up.

This area could become a real lunchtime destination: Mother Road Market, Fuel 66, Route 66 BBQ, Dena's Lebanese, La Flama, Hong Kong Chinese, Rosay's Wings. That is a nice varied assortment including several highly-rated places.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2017, 07:52:15 am by TulsaGoldenHurriCAN » Logged
DowntownDan
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 782


« Reply #50 on: July 27, 2017, 10:59:30 am »

The concept is almost identical to the Dallas Farmer's market, specifically, the part called "The Market", which is exactly like this, small kiosks for local restaurants/food service.  It is next door to "The Shed" which is their permanent open air farmer's market.  The shed has been around for decades but The Market is new and part of the larger rebranding of the farmer's market area.  I didn't see a true farmer's market component to this plan, but maybe it will include some kiosks that are for purchasing produce.  I love this idea and would love to see that intersection come together, including better use of the creepy maniquin building.
Logged
Dspike
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 80


« Reply #51 on: July 27, 2017, 11:38:51 am »

And while it is a few years off, these developments will be right on the 11th Street Bus Rapid Transit line. So TU to Mother Road Market to Soul City to downtown will be even more connected. If it is all successful, you could see a growth in the Cherry Street style replace-one-dilapidated-home-with-4-townhomes near 11th street.
Logged
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 601



« Reply #52 on: July 27, 2017, 11:45:23 am »

The concept is almost identical to the Dallas Farmer's market, specifically, the part called "The Market", which is exactly like this, small kiosks for local restaurants/food service.  It is next door to "The Shed" which is their permanent open air farmer's market.  The shed has been around for decades but The Market is new and part of the larger rebranding of the farmer's market area.  I didn't see a true farmer's market component to this plan, but maybe it will include some kiosks that are for purchasing produce.  I love this idea and would love to see that intersection come together, including better use of the creepy maniquin building.

OKC has a farmers market which also has an antique mall and a lot of potential to be a really neat place:
https://www.facebook.com/OKCFarmersPublicMarket/
http://okcfarmersmarket.com/the-antique-mall/

The renderings make it look like it will have some grocery kiosks.

Leave the mannequin building alone! That place is just part of the fabric of Tulsa and somehow just keeps on existing.
Logged
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 601



« Reply #53 on: July 27, 2017, 12:09:37 pm »

And while it is a few years off, these developments will be right on the 11th Street Bus Rapid Transit line. So TU to Mother Road Market to Soul City to downtown will be even more connected. If it is all successful, you could see a growth in the Cherry Street style replace-one-dilapidated-home-with-4-townhomes near 11th street.

Have you been to the neighborhood SE of 11th and Lewis, lately? That is the Renaissance Neighborhood. In the past it was a mixed bag, with the east side much nicer (East of Delaware) while the west side was pretty shabby. Over the last 10 years, the section west of Delaware has really come on line. There are very few "dilapidated" homes in Renaissance any more. The worst of them are the duplexes that fill a couple streets near the new brewery, but those just need updated, not demolished. The potential profits from  updating a house around there makes renting a tougher choice.

There are very few homes I would want to be demolished around there as so many have great bones in the 1920's English Cottage Revival style along with bungalows. The 1940's-50's homes along Delaware Place across from the school could use demolish/replacement or big updates, but as a whole the neighborhood is pretty awesome now with homes commonly going for $200k-$300k or more. That's a price point that just doesn't exist in the neighborhoods north or west of there (or NW in Whittier).

Unless you're talking about demolishing the ransacked houses north of 11th which is already being done by TU, Capital Homes, GKFF and others as they have a big neighborhood plan for that area with several huge developments planned and in process.
Logged
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
Philanthropist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 601



« Reply #54 on: August 14, 2017, 09:23:51 am »

Quote
Eleventh Street flexing its development muscle

More than 28 properties along 11th Street have been redeveloped in the past decade.


Based in Dallas with stores in Big D and Kansas City, Missouri, Josey Records was seeking a new location to hawk its nostalgia.

Eleventh Street in Tulsa fit the profile.

“This little strip right here opened up and they jumped on it,” Josey Records manager Josh Norrid said of company founders Luke Sardello and Waric Cameron. “They thought it was a perfect spot because it is close enough to downtown where the folks there can shop here.”

In March, Josey Records opened a 2,500-square-foot store at 1020 S. Rockford Ave.

“People are getting used to us being here and as people are moving to the area, we’re seeing more people who are walking through the area, walking their dogs or popping in with their kids,” Norrid said. “People seem to be digging it. I think we’re going to be here for a long time. As long as this area keeps growing, our business is going to be good.”

And growing, the corridor is.

“I do think that you’re going to see good infill in that area from say Peoria (Avenue) to Yale (Avenue),” said Jim Stephens, managing broker of JPS Commercial Real Estate.

From Harvard Avenue to the Inner Dispersal Loop, 28 properties along 11th Street (also known as Route 66) have been redeveloped in the past decade, with about half of those being transformed in the past five years, said Bob Pielsticker, first vice president of CBRE, a worldwide commercial real estate company with an office in Tulsa.

The uptick is due in part to rates in the city’s core. Pielsticker noted Tulsa Regional Chamber CEO Mike Neal’s mentioning that $1.5 billion worth of redevelopment has gone into the Brady District.

“Those values have really increased downtown,” Pielsticker said. “That pushes tenants to the east, where it’s cheaper to rent space or buy a building.”

That trickle-down effect radiates from the established Cherry Street district along 15th Street to lesser developed spokes such as 11th, Sixth and Third streets, he said.

“Most of the investment is local,” Pielsticker said. “That’s what is attractive about the redevelopment. You don’t have national chains — close to TU you do with the fast food — but most of the buildings that have been redeveloped are tenants that have taken advantage of the lower-lease threshold on 11th Street versus Cherry Street. So your furniture (stores), your designers have moved off Cherry Street down to 11th Street.

“A lot of the buildings that have been renovated have small boutiques, insurance, dog training … and then the designers have moved in. Fuel 66 is a neat concept. You are just getting some smaller investment, and it’s unique local development.”

Last month, the Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation announced plans to develop the $5.5 million, 26,000-square-foot Mother Road Market at 11th Street and Lewis Avenue. More intimate footprints in recent years have involved businesses such as Soul City, 918 Coffee, Lola’s Gypsy Caravan and Spirit Ranch Dog Training.

Fuel 66, a food truck court with an indoor bar, opened last fall on 11th Street just east of Lewis Avenue. Robert Carnoske, co-owner of the Masa food truck, is among the collaborators in the Fuel 66 project.

“Shortly after we moved in, they put together that Route 66 Commission,” he said. “We knew a lot of that was coming. Being there between TU and downtown, it was kind of a natural spot to be for us.

“Kendall Whittier has been super excited, too. We’re technically in the Kendall Whittier neighborhood, just on that north side of 11th Street. Just south of that is the Renaissance neighborhood. You have the new Renaissance Brewery going in and that neighborhood has always been strong. The neighbors walk over all the time. I’d say we have been well-received.”

Working on some co-branding opportunities with the University of Tulsa, Fuel 66 added a misting system a few weeks ago and is preparing to work on an enclosure for the patio for winter, Carnoske said.

“You have a lot of transients up and down that street,” he said. “But with us being there, it helps alleviate some of that worry just because we’re there all the time.”

In a talk to the University of Tulsa’s Friends of Finance in March, local developer/entrepreneur Elliot Nelson said an area of the city with “untapped potential” is 11th Street between TU and downtown “because there are a lot of storefronts we can create some density there and create a lot of street-front activity that’s not possible in other parts of town.”

A transportation improvement could hasten that sort of development.

Funded by the Tulsa Vision permanent transit tax that voters approved in April 2016, the Route 66 Bus Rapid Transit Line is being planned as a system that will follow 11th and 21st Streets and go from the Denver Avenue Station at Fourth Street in downtown Tulsa to 145th East Avenue at the Eastgate Metroplex. Its development will piggyback the recently announced Peoria Avenue BRT scheduled to launch in 2019.

Pielsticker envisions sustained success for the 11th Street corridor, given some caveats.

“If we improve the walkability and the bike routes, then you’ll see more people out there,” he says. “But there’s still more work to occur.

“I’m not sure the city can drive a lot of the growth. I think it’s going to be internal. I think it’s going to be local. The values are going to increase in the area, and as long as it’s a secure area to be in at night, you’re going to continue to see redevelopment in the area.”


http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/realestate/eleventh-street-flexing-its-development-muscle/article_6e04e45b-0b9b-52da-b07c-a5f6778480e9.html
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
  Hosted by TulsaConnect and Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
 

Mission

 

"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
more...

 

Contact

 

2210 S Main St.
Tulsa, OK 74114
(918) 409-2669
info@tulsanow.org