A grassroots organization focused on the intelligent and sustainable development, preservation and revitalization of Tulsa.
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 19, 2017, 04:15:53 am
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Can Oklahoma learn from Kansas  (Read 12949 times)
cannon_fodder
All around good guy.
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 9159



« Reply #135 on: April 04, 2016, 07:18:03 am »

Now Kansas legislators want to impeach state supreme court justices because they ruled education cuts were illegal under the constitution. They were but that's not important to those law makers with Rs after their names.

Anyone wanna bet these are the same people who want to return us to constitutional government...except when they don't?

Unfortunately, destroying an independent judiciary is a go-to model for the hard right.

When the Iowa Supreme Court concluded that the Iowa Constitution didn't allow a ban on gay marriage after applying the test for equality that had been spelled out - the right wing set out to oust them. For the first time in history, there was mass turnover on the Iowa Supreme Court. Unfortunately for the right wingers, the new Court affirmed the decision because THEY JUST APPLIED THE LAW.

Who is moving to remove the independence of the Court in Oklahoma and take us back to a system that was destroyed because it was the most corrupt in the nation?

Who wants to control Justices in Kansas?

If what you want to do is unconstitutional and you don't think you change the constitution, you need to eliminate the power of the Judicial branch. When the New Deal was pushing things far left, the same was done to force left wing politics. Just so happens the right is the one pushing that agenda at the moment.
Logged

- - - - - - - - -
I crush grooves.
heironymouspasparagus
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 11111



« Reply #136 on: April 04, 2016, 07:55:43 am »



If what you want to do is unconstitutional and you don't think you change the constitution, you need to eliminate the power of the Judicial branch. When the New Deal was pushing things far left, the same was done to force left wing politics. Just so happens the right is the one pushing that agenda at the moment.



Huh....just shows how wildly distorted our political system has become - and how radically right wing it is.  New Deal was not far left - unless compared to the RWRE Murdochian/Koch agenda.  It was an excellent example of the symbiosis that should exist between government and the people - ALL the people, not just the 1% who have hijacked the agenda and the actual social fabric.  (See Trump/Cruz poll numbers...)

If one were to be a Christian in this country - this would be exactly the type service...social security....that the Man these people profess to follow would approve of.  And it's not welfare, it isn't giving anyone something for free, which the RWRE is trying to paint it - shame on them!   It's an annuity that I and everyone else have paid for.  The 1% agenda has trashed the whole concept of pension in the last 35 years, and now they are working to kill this last one so they can get their hands on that money, too.



"And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me."  -Mathew 25:40.

But the RWRE wouldn't know about that, since the only part of the Bible they read is the Old Testament...

Logged

“When you wage war on the public schools, you're attacking the mortar that holds the community together. You're not a conservative, you're a vandal.”    - Garrison Keillor

Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without.

What you do speaks so loud, I cannot hear what you say.
Townsend
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12009



« Reply #137 on: May 03, 2016, 11:45:39 am »

Tulsa Cuts 142 Teachers

http://publicradiotulsa.org/post/tulsa-cuts-142-teachers

Quote
The Tulsa School Board votes to trim 142 teaching positions from the district. The board took the vote last night. Superintendent Doctor Deborah Gist says the district is making the best out of a bad situation.

The cuts are brought on by state budget cuts. Trimming the teachers and some support personnel will save the TPS about $8 million.

Most of the teaching jobs are already vacant. The district will attempt to cut the rest by attrition. The action will push up class sizes in all district schools.
Logged
Townsend
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12009



« Reply #138 on: May 27, 2016, 07:21:09 am »

Oh, Oklahoma - What happens when voters distrust their politicians so much that they bind their hands

http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21699450-what-happens-when-voters-distrust-their-politicians-so-much-they-bind-their-hands-oh

Quote
SOME weeks ago Oklahoma’s teacher of the year for 2016, Shawn Sheehan, dined in Washington, DC, with counterparts from California and Washington state. The mood was jolly until the high-flyers, all finalists for national teacher of the year, compared salaries. When Mr Sheehan—a young teacher of mathematics and special education—revealed his pay, his table-mates “sort of went silent”. For in state rankings of teachers’ pay Oklahoma comes 48th. Washington’s teacher of the year has since been urging Mr Sheehan to move to the West Coast. “He’s been sending me house listings,” he says, ruefully.

Oklahomans dislike such stories. They are sternly conservative: God-fearing, tornado-lashed prairie folk, so proud of their mineral wealth that an oil well stands next to the State Capitol, where feebler types might plant flowers. They scorn big government—the state is in the bottom third for tax revenue per person. But Oklahomans care about their public schools, which educate the vast majority of their kids, and which (notably via sport) are social anchors for many towns. So they wince when good teachers are lured elsewhere. Even now, as slumping oil and gas prices have been followed by a deep budget crisis, the Republican governor, Mary Fallin, says she wants to give teachers a raise, an ambition echoed by legislators from both parties. A poll last year found 98% of Oklahomans back higher classroom pay, dividing only over whether to raise salaries across-the-board, or on merit.

That consensus makes raising teachers’ pay a good test of basic governance. Alas, legislators negotiating a new budget have spent May failing it. Democrats blocked a scheme involving higher cigarette taxes, because they wanted some of the revenues for health care. Republicans introduced and withdrew a proposal to increase teachers’ pay while cutting their other benefits. Worse, with days left to fill a $1.3 billion hole in the budget, Republicans devoted long hours to further loosening gun laws, to arguing about transgender pupils in school bathrooms and to passing a law that sought to make performing almost all abortions a felony. That attempt to criminalise abortion was certain to be struck down as unconstitutional in the courts. Governor Fallin vetoed the law, calling it ambiguously worded. The only doctor in the state senate, a Republican who personally opposes abortion, was crisper in his diagnosis, calling the proposal “insane”.

Budget negotiations ended without a pay rise for teachers (and indeed resulted in a 16% cut to higher education), so the matter is now in the hands of voters. A bipartisan group wants to ask them to increase education funding by adding a penny in the dollar to state sales taxes in November. Their ballot measure, State Question 779, is backed by a former Democratic governor, David Boren, and a group of business bosses and former members of Ms Fallin’s cabinet. It aims to raise $615m, enough for a $5,000 increase per teacher. Even supporters admit that sales taxes are a clumsy way to raise money, because the poor spend a larger share of their incomes on day-to-day shopping. Mr Boren, an old-fashioned centrist who is now president of the University of Oklahoma, calls sales taxes “regressive” and would have been “thrilled” if lawmakers had acted. Mr Sheehan, another backer of the initiative, worries about the impact on low-income families, though he argues that schools are often their best ladder out of poverty. The ballot initiative amounts to voters telling legislators: “you guys are not doing your job,” says the teacher, who is running as an independent for the state senate in November.

Mr Boren sees a problem of political culture. For 25 years both Democrats and Republicans have won elections in Oklahoma by promising tax cuts. In the 1990s voters amended the state constitution so the legislature can only increase taxes if super-majorities of three-in-four members agree, or if voters say yes in a referendum. After living through three boom-and-bust commodities cycles, the 75-year-old ex-governor fretted as he saw Republicans cut state income taxes twice, against a backdrop of surging oil production and revenues. “Oklahomans got sold on a free lunch,” says Mr Boren. Businesses wanted a free lunch too, he adds: demanding tax breaks and subsidies, while still expecting a well-trained workforce. Republicans do not wholly disagree. Senator Rob Standridge represents the district that Mr Sheehan is contesting, near Oklahoma City. Though Mr Standridge defends low tax rates, he laments that states get into bidding wars to woo employers: “We spend way too much on incentives.”

Bound and gagged

The campaign behind the ballot initiative polled voters to ask if they would tolerate higher income, property or sales taxes to invest in education. Income taxes divided voters along partisan lines, with Republicans rejecting rises. As for property taxes, Oklahomans like them low—Mr Boren links this to their history as land-rich, cash-poor homesteaders. Most backed higher sales taxes. People tell Mr Boren that they like sales tax because “everybody pays it,” unlike fiddlier taxes that the rich can dodge.

The Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, a smaller-government group that tried to block the measure in court, says Oklahoma cities could end up with some of the country’s highest sales taxes. It points to polls showing an option that Oklahomans like better: paying teachers by cutting tax credits for wind and renewable energies, and other corporate subsidies. But that risks clashes between special interests: scrapping tax breaks for wind energy is a priority for Oklahoma’s mighty oil and gas industry.

A narrow question of public policy—how to stop Texas and other neighbours pinching Oklahoma teachers—has exposed broad, not very cheering truths about democracy. Elected politicians have prospered by urging voters to distrust them. Voters duly bound legislators’ hands to limit government mischief. Now Oklahoma is struggling to deliver a policy with near-universal support. Hope that someone learns a lesson from all this.
Logged
heironymouspasparagus
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 11111



« Reply #139 on: June 06, 2016, 09:54:43 am »

Oh, Oklahoma - What happens when voters distrust their politicians so much that they bind their hands

http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21699450-what-happens-when-voters-distrust-their-politicians-so-much-they-bind-their-hands-oh




Disgusting situation.  We are spiraling in, out of control, and Failin' and the Clown Show keep fiddlin' while Rome burns.....

Logged

“When you wage war on the public schools, you're attacking the mortar that holds the community together. You're not a conservative, you're a vandal.”    - Garrison Keillor

Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without.

What you do speaks so loud, I cannot hear what you say.
Townsend
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12009



« Reply #140 on: June 08, 2016, 12:03:02 pm »

Oklahoma Schools Chief Laments Elimination of Textbook Funds

http://publicradiotulsa.org/post/oklahoma-schools-chief-laments-elimination-textbook-funds

Quote
The Oklahoma State Department of Education says it's recommending that schools not buy any new textbooks this year because of a lack of state funding.

The department said Wednesday that lawmakers did not appropriate any money for new textbooks for the fiscal year that begins July 1. State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister says students will be forced to use "outdated and tattered school books held together by duct tape."

Last fiscal year, the department received $33 million for textbooks.

Hofmeister says the department is recommending a one-year delay of textbook selection. The 13-member State Textbook Committee is expected to consider the recommendation at a special meeting later this month.
Logged
Townsend
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 12009



« Reply #141 on: June 21, 2016, 11:22:29 am »

Govenor To Meet With Rating Agencies

http://publicradiotulsa.org/post/govenor-meet-rating-agencies

Quote
Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin is traveling to New York this week to visit with some of the nation's top credit rating agencies, and she's taking top state lawmakers with her.

Fallin spoke to reporters Monday following a meeting of the State Board of Equalization. She said she plans to leave Tuesday for a New York trip with Oklahoma Treasurer Ken Miller, her Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger, House Speaker-designate Charles McCall, and Oklahoma City Sen. Greg Treat, who is vice-chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Fallin says she wants to include legislators on the visits to ensure they understand the nuances rating agencies consider when analyzing Oklahoma's budget practices.

Moody's Investors Service last week gave Oklahoma negative marks for drawing down reserves and cutting funding to higher education.

So...good for her for telling folks that's why she's going...I assume she's using this as a chance to try to get in front of Trump's folks.

It's difficult to deal with the fact that Mary Fallin is the person who has to hold Oklahoma Legislators' hands and show them what they are doing to Oklahoma is hurting people.
Logged
heironymouspasparagus
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 11111



« Reply #142 on: June 21, 2016, 11:42:32 am »

Govenor To Meet With Rating Agencies

http://publicradiotulsa.org/post/govenor-meet-rating-agencies

So...good for her for telling folks that's why she's going...I assume she's using this as a chance to try to get in front of Trump's folks.

It's difficult to deal with the fact that Mary Fallin is the person who has to hold Oklahoma Legislators' hands and show them what they are doing to Oklahoma is hurting people.


She has been holding their hands - like the 5 year old's they are - and dragging them along every step of the way like a Mommy drags her kid through a store.

Logged

“When you wage war on the public schools, you're attacking the mortar that holds the community together. You're not a conservative, you're a vandal.”    - Garrison Keillor

Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without.

What you do speaks so loud, I cannot hear what you say.
cannon_fodder
All around good guy.
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 9159



« Reply #143 on: June 21, 2016, 11:53:38 am »

According to his travel itinerary, Trump is in NY until Thursday (when he leaves to open a golf course in Scotland).
Logged

- - - - - - - - -
I crush grooves.
heironymouspasparagus
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 11111



« Reply #144 on: June 21, 2016, 11:57:39 am »

According to his travel itinerary, Trump is in NY until Thursday (when he leaves to open a golf course in Scotland).


Maybe we will luck out and she will resign as Governor to chase VP!!   It could happen....  Sarah did, sort of.
Logged

“When you wage war on the public schools, you're attacking the mortar that holds the community together. You're not a conservative, you're a vandal.”    - Garrison Keillor

Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without.

What you do speaks so loud, I cannot hear what you say.
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
  Hosted by TulsaConnect and Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
 

Mission

 

"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
more...

 

Contact

 

2210 S Main St.
Tulsa, OK 74114
(918) 409-2669
info@tulsanow.org