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November 17, 2019, 08:08:44 pm
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Author Topic: Downtown Development Overview  (Read 341292 times)
swake
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« Reply #1530 on: October 10, 2019, 03:52:36 pm »

Freight elevator of some sort up at the Reunion building. They've seemingly been going at this pretty hard, been ripping a lot of stuff out from inside for the last couple of months.



It's being converted into 80 apartments by Rose Rock
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ComeOnBenjals
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« Reply #1531 on: October 10, 2019, 03:59:23 pm »

It's being converted into 80 apartments by Rose Rock

Over 120 units in the work combined with that other project by Price... good stuff!
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ComeOnBenjals
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« Reply #1532 on: October 17, 2019, 03:38:27 pm »

The Adams Apartments breathe new life into historic building downtown


"We totally believe in development that gets people walking downtown," Rose Rock CEO Steven Watts said. "Any time you activate a vacant building, it creates life and energy around that space. No one wants to walk by a dark, old building with no one in it."

"The last tenant in the 13-story building, 403 S. Cheyenne Ave., was a Latin grill that closed its doors on the ground floor about three years ago.

Replacing it on the first floor, which features the structure's original terra cotta, will be the Caló Latin Grill & Tequileria. Above that are six studio apartments that start at $675, a total of 10 two-bedroom units and 49 one-bedroom apartments, Watts said."

"Our goal any time we do urban development is to create something mixed-use, with ground floor activity," he said. "… Hopefully, eventually, in downtown, we can have a drug store and a grocery store and all these other things that people want. But all those retailers need bodies. So the first order of business is to get people living down here."

"The market has really responded well to this project," said Scott Moehlenbrock, Rose Rock vice president. "We were were 90-percent leased out in about three and a half months. There's definitely a demand for it."

https://www.tulsaworld.com/business/the-adams-apartments-breathe-new-life-into-historic-building-downtown/article_7b8ab9ab-b2b1-5f3e-9387-1e4c84dab002.html#tncms-source=infinity-scroll-summary-siderail-latest

Good stuff...The more people living downtown, the better!
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shavethewhales
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« Reply #1533 on: October 21, 2019, 07:50:16 am »

Some recent photos from Friday.

The new Greenwood building is vertical. Should rise pretty fast since it is using a steel frame.


The View has indeed broken ground at last.


WPX HQ is moving along with groundwork. Anyone know what these things are? Kinda looks like they are making those concrete road blocks.



Davenport:


Old Yeti location:
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SXSW
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« Reply #1534 on: October 21, 2019, 04:05:03 pm »

Some recent photos from Friday.

The new Greenwood building is vertical. Should rise pretty fast since it is using a steel frame.


Thanks for the update.  Is that this building at 1st & Greenwood?
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swake
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« Reply #1535 on: October 21, 2019, 04:53:30 pm »

So I was looking at Google Maps to see how this building will be oriented, and in 3D Satellite View, there is a very strange line of 71 (I counted) school busses driving down 2nd Street on what looks to be a normal business day. 71 busses downtown?
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ComeOnBenjals
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« Reply #1536 on: October 22, 2019, 08:30:47 am »

Great pictures Whales, thanks!

Drove past the WPX site last night, and was surprised to see a full crew working well past 7... must be trying to push this early work pretty hard.
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Markk
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« Reply #1537 on: October 22, 2019, 08:42:03 am »

So I was looking at Google Maps to see how this building will be oriented, and in 3D Satellite View, there is a very strange line of 71 (I counted) school busses driving down 2nd Street on what looks to be a normal business day. 71 busses downtown?

Picking up folks for FEMA camp relocation.
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shavethewhales
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« Reply #1538 on: October 22, 2019, 09:11:16 am »

^^^^Yes, that's the 111 Greenwood building starting to go up.

lol, the google map imagery lays a bunch of photos over each other sometimes. Some of the current imagery contains pieces of one of the parades. It's weird how the buses fade off into the mist...

Google is going to need to keep taking fresh shots every year to keep up with all the changes downtown.
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MostSeriousness
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« Reply #1539 on: October 22, 2019, 09:18:24 am »

So I was looking at Google Maps to see how this building will be oriented, and in 3D Satellite View, there is a very strange line of 71 (I counted) school busses driving down 2nd Street on what looks to be a normal business day. 71 busses downtown?

I think it was Mayfest-related. There's some views in the Downtown area with Blue Dome Arts Festival and Mayfest traffic/setup
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DTowner
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« Reply #1540 on: October 22, 2019, 10:24:58 am »

So I was looking at Google Maps to see how this building will be oriented, and in 3D Satellite View, there is a very strange line of 71 (I counted) school busses driving down 2nd Street on what looks to be a normal business day. 71 busses downtown?

A lot of school buses are usually downtown for the Veterans Day and MLK Day parades.
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« Reply #1541 on: October 22, 2019, 02:25:46 pm »

So I was looking at Google Maps to see how this building will be oriented, and in 3D Satellite View, there is a very strange line of 71 (I counted) school busses driving down 2nd Street on what looks to be a normal business day. 71 busses downtown?

It was the Veteran's Day parade from 2017.
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Jeff P
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« Reply #1542 on: October 24, 2019, 01:47:26 pm »

Agreed that looking at demographics should be done by MSA not by city at this point. OKC MSA grew 11.4% since 2010 and 15.7% from 2000 to 2010. Tulsa's MSA grew 6.0% since 2010 and 9.1% from 2000 to 2010. So, as we all probably knew, OKC has grown faster since 2000 but not incredibly faster. Note that from 1990-2000 the growth rates were very similar (around 13%).

OKC: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oklahoma_City_metropolitan_area

Tulsa: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulsa_metropolitan_area#Metropolitan_Statistical_Area

Good info here.

As I was reading the thread about average income and what not, I was curious how OKC's massive city limits impacts that?  For example, are there "suburban" parts of OKC that are still within the city limits, and thus contributing to higher average income? I honestly don't know because I've never spent much time there.... because I know one of the highest income zip codes in the state is in Jenks, so I wonder if Tulsa had sprawling city limits akin to what OKC has that the "suburban" development to the south that is in Jenks would have been in the city limits instead? 

Same goes for eastern sprawl into Broken Arrow and northern sprawl into Owasso?
« Last Edit: October 24, 2019, 01:49:32 pm by Jeff P » Logged
T. Jamison
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« Reply #1543 on: October 24, 2019, 04:13:20 pm »

Good info here.

As I was reading the thread about average income and what not, I was curious how OKC's massive city limits impacts that?  For example, are there "suburban" parts of OKC that are still within the city limits, and thus contributing to higher average income? I honestly don't know because I've never spent much time there.... because I know one of the highest income zip codes in the state is in Jenks, so I wonder if Tulsa had sprawling city limits akin to what OKC has that the "suburban" development to the south that is in Jenks would have been in the city limits instead? 

Same goes for eastern sprawl into Broken Arrow and northern sprawl into Owasso?

Anecdotally, I imagine the sprawl doesn't have that effect. A majority of the sprawl is in rural areas, less so suburban. And some of the sprawl surrounds smaller municipalities on all sides i.e Bethany, Warr Acres, The Village, Mustang, Nicoma Park and Nichols Hills. And Nichols Hills is probably the highest income of any municipality in Oklahoma. So a lot of the sprawl OKC has is not the desirable kind.
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #1544 on: October 27, 2019, 07:10:31 pm »

Good info here.

As I was reading the thread about average income and what not, I was curious how OKC's massive city limits impacts that?  For example, are there "suburban" parts of OKC that are still within the city limits, and thus contributing to higher average income? I honestly don't know because I've never spent much time there.... because I know one of the highest income zip codes in the state is in Jenks, so I wonder if Tulsa had sprawling city limits akin to what OKC has that the "suburban" development to the south that is in Jenks would have been in the city limits instead? 

Same goes for eastern sprawl into Broken Arrow and northern sprawl into Owasso?


OKC city limits goes out to mile marker 147 on the Turner Turnpike.  That is past the Luther exit.

They started that back in the 60's for some unknown stupid reason.  At one time it was the largest (geographically) city in the world. 

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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I don’t share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
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