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December 18, 2018, 09:31:29 pm
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #180 on: April 25, 2018, 08:05:22 am »


They are all going for looks over function.  That last one didn't have a fridge again, and that may be a dishwasher one cabinet over from sink, but inconveniently distant from sink.   I like wood cabinets pretty well - tends to soften the look and make it more welcoming to me.  Am also only interested in functionality as a kitchen - the island can act as transition to the living area, but if two can't cook in it, it's a major fail to me.

White kitchens - that melamine look - are too much like my garage.  I use those same cabinets in the garage as storage shelves, but with more generic handles/knobs.  I need the brightness it brings since there are no windows.  The kitchen has windows so can put up with a little darker surface.  

One kitchen I saws and would build if I could afford it had black walnut cabinets, old decorative tin metal ceiling panels like an old saloon circa 1880, and black walnut hardwood floors, stained very dark.   Needless to say, it took a lot of lighting to make it work!  The layout was amazing and extremely well suited for both cooking and entertaining.  (I have been 'collecting' walnut lumber and trees for quite a while, so maybe will get there eventually...)


Old kitchens are far more functionally limited (besides being ugly and poorly designed). Modern kitchen design is more about functionality for more than just 1 purpose. Still, I'd much rather cook in our updated kitchen with an island and many varied countertop spaces than in the kitchens my parents/uncles/grandparents had from earlier decades. All of them that have updated their kitchens went to large-island format and they're much more usable and functionality is much much better (and you can fit 12+ people in them comfortably when designed properly) and you can always have 3+ people cooking at same time in the newer kitchens I've been in. Old kitchens are mostly limited to 1 or 2 people.

Just because the refrigerator is not in that particular view does not mean there isn't one! You think they'd do a hundred thousand dollar+ kitchen and forget about the fridge!? Grin It's just on the wall behind photographer. Madre de dios!
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cannon_fodder
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« Reply #181 on: April 25, 2018, 08:19:15 am »

I really like that the "updated" kitchens seem to include an additional 600 square feet.  Or half a midtown home.   Smiley
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #182 on: April 25, 2018, 09:56:57 am »

I really like that the "updated" kitchens seem to include an additional 600 square feet.  Or half a midtown home.   Smiley

Our updated midtown kitchen is pretty much taking the original footprint but lays it out in a way that the space is more accessible and opening to dining room is larger. It might be about 200 square feet larger than the original kitchen, but it's not much bigger than our first house's galley kitchen (tiny 1,000 square foot midtown cottage). It is laid out and distributed so much better so that it feels about twice as large. The old one has a very quaint cottage vibe to it which I wouldn't want to destroy. It was beautifully remodeled with original cabinets and floors.
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TeeDub
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« Reply #183 on: April 25, 2018, 10:11:48 am »


When you give up the dining room to enlarge the kitchen it also makes a subtle statement about modern families.  Why sit around and look at each other while you eat when in the real world, everyone has their face in the television or their phones?
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #184 on: April 25, 2018, 11:35:55 am »


Just because the refrigerator is not in that particular view does not mean there isn't one! You think they'd do a hundred thousand dollar+ kitchen and forget about the fridge!? Grin It's just on the wall behind photographer. Madre de dios!



I guess I wasn't clear - can't SEE the fridge.  That means with both of those shown, it is by definition a lousy layout for a kitchen.  Fridge should be convenient to food prep area.  Those would be ideally suited to getting a Papa Murphy's and putting it in the oven.  And having everyone sit around the island watching pizza cook!

Dishwasher location still sucks....

The kitchen I am designing for the new place will accommodate 4 cooking at once, but still be convenient for 1 or 2.   And we will eat in that open area adjacent to the kitchen...previously known as a dining area.  TV will be visible/viewable.  Will be an open concept.

« Last Edit: April 25, 2018, 11:38:48 am by heironymouspasparagus » Logged

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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #185 on: April 25, 2018, 01:36:30 pm »

When you give up the dining room to enlarge the kitchen it also makes a subtle statement about modern families.  Why sit around and look at each other while you eat when in the real world, everyone has their face in the television or their phones?

Do modern kitchens really take away dining rooms? Most I've seen just add another dining area (the cabinet-height bar/center island). They mostly have dining areas also next to them, just less of a wall between kitchen usually. It makes it easier to interact while someone's cooking and someone else is in dining room or have people sit and hang out while waiting for food to be prepared. Pretty flexible and much more convenient than a completely separated dining room.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #186 on: April 25, 2018, 01:42:42 pm »

When you give up the dining room to enlarge the kitchen it also makes a subtle statement about modern families.  Why sit around and look at each other while you eat when in the real world, everyone has their face in the television or their phones?

The urban 8's have a very large dining area and kitchen island with large bar/sitting area. https://photos.zillowstatic.com/p_f/ISaptgj0pst0ou0000000000.jpg

It would be nice if the island went a little closer to the fridge, but overall the design of the space (and having the additional seating in kitchen) enhances and increases the options for where to sit and rest/work/eat/drink.
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #187 on: April 25, 2018, 03:49:04 pm »

Do modern kitchens really take away dining rooms? Most I've seen just add another dining area (the cabinet-height bar/center island). They mostly have dining areas also next to them, just less of a wall between kitchen usually. It makes it easier to interact while someone's cooking and someone else is in dining room or have people sit and hang out while waiting for food to be prepared. Pretty flexible and much more convenient than a completely separated dining room.


They don't take away, they just open up...a great approach for dining area - no wall and open between the two.  Some find it too informal, but are right about the flexibility and better interaction.  Exactly where I am headed.   Just have to resolve the conflict between black walnut furnishings in kitchen area and maple in dining/living area...



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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I donít share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #188 on: April 26, 2018, 11:14:45 am »


They don't take away, they just open up...a great approach for dining area - no wall and open between the two.  Some find it too informal, but are right about the flexibility and better interaction.  Exactly where I am headed.   Just have to resolve the conflict between black walnut furnishings in kitchen area and maple in dining/living area...



Also, modern living has become much more casual. It used to be all about keeping a formal dining area so guests don't have to see the "dirty" inner workings of a kitchen. Considering how food is more often prepared nowadays (a bit more pre-made stuff/simple mixes, less messy from-scratch cooking), kitchens typically remain reasonably clean even during parties. Also, hosts don't typically serve everyone like it used to be and basically no one hires maids to do that. So better to just show off all the items as they're being prepared/baked and show off that nice shiny kitchen while interacting with your guests/family while they wait. 
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Townsend
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« Reply #189 on: April 26, 2018, 11:19:04 am »

Also, modern living has become much more casual. It used to be all about keeping a formal dining area so guests don't have to see the "dirty" inner workings of a kitchen. Considering how food is more often prepared nowadays (a bit more pre-made stuff/simple mixes, less messy from-scratch cooking), kitchens typically remain reasonably clean even during parties. Also, hosts don't typically serve everyone like it used to be and basically no one hires maids to do that. So better to just show off all the items as they're being prepared/baked and show off that nice shiny kitchen while interacting with your guests/family while they wait. 

I trash my kitchen when I cook.  I just don't invite anyone who would give a smile.
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #190 on: April 26, 2018, 01:25:58 pm »

Also, modern living has become much more casual. It used to be all about keeping a formal dining area so guests don't have to see the "dirty" inner workings of a kitchen. Considering how food is more often prepared nowadays (a bit more pre-made stuff/simple mixes, less messy from-scratch cooking), kitchens typically remain reasonably clean even during parties. Also, hosts don't typically serve everyone like it used to be and basically no one hires maids to do that. So better to just show off all the items as they're being prepared/baked and show off that nice shiny kitchen while interacting with your guests/family while they wait.  


Microwaves rule!!    

We do exactly that, but the whole kitchen/dining/living spaces are very close - whole thing is about 12' x 24' so can't get very far away from anyone while in that area.  We have had family events with up to 28 - 30 people in attendance.  Cozy...!


Ran across this for other reasons a few days ago, but the kitchen stood out as a good example of design/layout for 1 person cooking for a limited number of guests...maybe up to 5 or 6 or so...?  Well, except for the missing oven part of it.  The work flow is very good for such limited space.  At about 4:20 into the video.  (This is also design inspiration for the house, except for the tiny part of it and a loft...I hate the concept of a loft - both for the stairs and in so many cases, the limited head room - been living that dream for over 11 years and it really, really, sucks after a while - just try making the bed with only 4 feet of headroom!)   Right to left - food storage, prep area, cleanup area.  Elegant simplicity - my favorite cause!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avn7brkxmmo

« Last Edit: April 26, 2018, 01:27:51 pm by heironymouspasparagus » Logged

"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I donít share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
Conan71
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« Reply #191 on: April 26, 2018, 08:15:42 pm »

I trash my kitchen when I cook.  I just don't invite anyone who would give a smile.

I gave a sh!t, I think I'd had enough to drink at that point I didn't care.
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« Reply #192 on: April 27, 2018, 10:47:54 am »

I think I'd had enough to drink at that point I didn't care.

Same
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #193 on: May 02, 2018, 11:05:09 am »


Microwaves rule!!    

We do exactly that, but the whole kitchen/dining/living spaces are very close - whole thing is about 12' x 24' so can't get very far away from anyone while in that area.  We have had family events with up to 28 - 30 people in attendance.  Cozy...!


Ran across this for other reasons a few days ago, but the kitchen stood out as a good example of design/layout for 1 person cooking for a limited number of guests...maybe up to 5 or 6 or so...?  Well, except for the missing oven part of it.  The work flow is very good for such limited space.  At about 4:20 into the video.  (This is also design inspiration for the house, except for the tiny part of it and a loft...I hate the concept of a loft - both for the stairs and in so many cases, the limited head room - been living that dream for over 11 years and it really, really, sucks after a while - just try making the bed with only 4 feet of headroom!)   Right to left - food storage, prep area, cleanup area.  Elegant simplicity - my favorite cause!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avn7brkxmmo



That's a gorgeous cottage! That is a good efficiently setup kitchen. Not my styling (and wish it were more old-world/lumberjack vibe to fit that cottage), but looks like a great use of limited space.
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #194 on: May 02, 2018, 01:38:50 pm »

That's a gorgeous cottage! That is a good efficiently setup kitchen. Not my styling (and wish it were more old-world/lumberjack vibe to fit that cottage), but looks like a great use of limited space.


I could do a lot of cooking in that!! 

I especially like the "Hansel & Gretel" style - perhaps they left the oven out for a reason...to keep mean little kids from cooking them...!!??   They did kinda go 'modern' on the inside after a really great outside start.  But no matter what, stainless appliances are probably never gonna give that feel that I want and you expressed - old world lumberjack.

Am planning to make a little 'guest house' along those lines - hand split oak shingles, etc.  But no second story!  There is also one of those old fairy tales about "There was a crooked man and he went a crooked mile...".     Like this...only no pastels!

http://www.bcx.news/photos/places/themeparks/enchanted_forest/crooked_man/





 

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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I donít share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
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