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Author Topic: Oklahoma City FC will be playing the New York Cosmos, not Tulsa.  (Read 18078 times)
dbacksfan 2.0
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« Reply #60 on: January 10, 2014, 03:43:31 am »

If Tulsa had built BOk before Katrina, I truly believe that the shoe would be on the other foot.
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« Reply #61 on: January 10, 2014, 10:57:16 am »

via Twitter:   IMSoccer News ‏@IMSoccerNews 8 Jan
Unconfirmed, but hearing from source that new NASL team in OKC will not be starting in 2015 as previously announced.
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« Reply #62 on: January 10, 2014, 02:05:19 pm »

There are all kinds of rumors out there about the Oklahoma City NASL, USL-Pro & NPSL teams?  Haven't heard anything official yet; hopefully, something official will be released soon.
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« Reply #63 on: January 17, 2014, 10:23:58 pm »

If Tulsa had built BOk before Katrina, I truly believe that the shoe would be on the other foot.
DB, the NBA probably would not go into a market of less than 1 million even if a Taj Mahal type facility was available, so it would have been highly unlikely that the shoe would have been on the other foot.  At the time, OKC was considered a risky proposition for the temporary relo of the Hornets for a number of reasons.  If they'd passed on OKC, they probably would have opted to set up in KC or maybe even Birmingham.  Louisville would have probably been the top choice had there been an NBA level arena in the city at that time.

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« Reply #64 on: January 19, 2014, 06:37:00 am »

If Tulsa had built BOk before Katrina, I truly believe that the shoe would be on the other foot.

I think you are being too optimistic. The reason the Thunder are in OKC is more because eight OKC businessmen wanted to get a teams there, had the money to do so and had been working to to that end for a few years; not that the NBA thought it was something that needed to happen. At least some members of that group had been taking minority positions in other teams at least a few years be before Katrina and networking (the league is pretty much a good old boys network with more diversity), which probably is part of why the Hornets played there in the first place, it also is also why several of the Thunder's core group were up and comers from San Antonio's management team.

While they probably had hopes of just keeping the Hornets (now Pelicans), they knew the writing was on the wall with that option after the first year was up, so before the second year the Hornets were playing there they bought the Sonics. The league was already fed up with not being able to get any arena deals (by which I mean hundreds of millions in subsidies) made over the prior ten years their, the team was losing tens of millions every year. So the option for relocation was go where the owners wanted it, that had a good showing during for a temporary team and passed subsidies to finish the build out to NBA standards or keep a team in a situation that is going to be losing money for the foreseeable future. The main things standing in the way to move was the team was a clause they had to show an attempt to get a new stadium deal with the city/state over a one year period and there was a three year lease (they were eventually able to get out of after just one year).

« Last Edit: January 19, 2014, 07:02:34 am by Snowman » Logged
Laramie
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« Reply #65 on: January 19, 2014, 03:24:33 pm »

It was a costly buyout for the Supersonic owners:

"Bennett announced that the settlement calls for a payment of $45 million immediately, and would include another $30 million paid to Seattle in 2013 if the state legislature in Washington authorizes at least $75 million in public funding to renovate KeyArena by the end of 2009 and Seattle doesn't obtain an NBA franchise of its own within the next five years."

When 2010 and 2013 ended; it sealed the deal and the owners didn't have to pay that additional $30 million; it closed the chapter on the City of Seattle vs. the NBA Supersonics debacle.

Link:  http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/news/story?id=3471503

I'm just glad that we have the NBA in Oklahoma.  Now we need the MLS here and Tulsa does have the history and the income available to support an MLS franchise or an NHL franchise.    The BOK Center could easily be retrofitted to get it NHL or NBA ready.  Who's to say that a second NBA team in Oklahoma (Tulsa) is far-fetched?

Imagine a Tulsa vs. OKC rivalry in the NBA along with NBA franchises in Oklahoma's proximity--Texas (Dallas, Houston, San Antonio), one in Colorado (Denver) and one in Tennessee (Memphis) on the Arkansas-Tennessee border.  St. Louis and Kansas City would be marginal for the NBA at this point since they are overextended major sports markets.

At Number 5, 7;  Kansas City and St. Louis are among the top ten overextended sports markets.

Link:  http://www.bizjournals.com/bizjournals/on-numbers/scott-thomas/2011/08/denver-is-most-overextended-market.html

These studies are for feasibility purposes and not something carved in stone.  They look at the financial availability of a sports market and if it has the resources available to handle major professional sports--there are no guarantees.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2014, 03:32:56 pm by Laramie » Logged

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« Reply #66 on: January 19, 2014, 06:10:28 pm »

It's good to dream big and aim high.   

Oklahoma is fortunate to have one NBA team.  Yes, thanks to the ownership group and the other factors that worked out in their favor at that time (demonstrated success with the Hornets, the untenable situation in Seattle, and Louisville being in the radar cross-hair without an NBA type arena ready until 2010).  The league won't allow 2 teams within an approximate 100 mile radius with just over 2 million inhabitants between them for support.  The best thing that could have happened for the entire state was for the Thunder to play a few regular season home games in Tulsa to make it truly a regional experience.  But we know that was/ is not going to happen.

NHL - not a chance.  Tulsa is just not a hockey city as evidenced by crowds of only 4,000+ in the BOK for the CHL (not even AHL level product).

Tulsa's only realistic opportunity for a major league sports team would be in landing an MLS franchise. 

I don't know how much stock I can put into the listing of overextended markets.  It relies too heavily on income and not enough on other important factors such as fan passion which may lead some people to spend more of their discretionary income on sports than on other pursuits.  Some high profile cities not on the list such as Atlanta, L.A., and Miami are not really great sports towns.  While their residents may have sufficient income to support teams in all of the major leagues, they don't necessarily spend it attending sporting events, particularly when their teams are not of championship caliber.   Boston, Philly, Chicago, and yes St. Louis (which is on the list) on the other hand are great sports towns.  Buffalo which has been economically woeful and hemorrhaging population since the 1960's strongly supports it's 2 pro teams.  So much so that fans probably sacrifice too much for tickets at the expense of some other necessities.

The list identifies Denver as the No. 1 such market, citing more income is needed to support its 5 professional teams.  The reality is that Denver's support for all of its teams is consistently strong and solid.  This perhaps indicates that Denver residents may choose to drop a greater portion of their entertainment dollar on sports than let's say the theatre, philharmonic, or other forms of entertainment.
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« Reply #67 on: January 19, 2014, 06:26:07 pm »

It's good to dream big and aim high.   

Oklahoma is fortunate to have one NBA team.  Yes, thanks to the ownership group and the other factors that worked out in their favor at that time (demonstrated success with the Hornets, the untenable situation in Seattle, and Louisville being in the radar cross-hair without an NBA type arena ready until 2010).  The league won't allow 2 teams within an approximate 100 mile radius with just over 2 million inhabitants between them for support.  The best thing that could have happened for the entire state was for the Thunder to play a few regular season home games in Tulsa to make it truly a regional experience.  But we know that was/ is not going to happen.

NHL - not a chance.  Tulsa is just not a hockey city as evidenced by crowds of only 4,000+ in the BOK for the CHL (not even AHL level product).

Tulsa's only realistic opportunity for a major league sports team would be in landing an MLS franchise. 

I don't know how much stock I can put into the listing of overextended markets.  It relies too heavily on income and not enough on other important factors such as fan passion which may lead some people to spend more of their discretionary income on sports than on other pursuits.  Some high profile cities not on the list such as Atlanta, L.A., and Miami are not really great sports towns.  While their residents may have sufficient income to support teams in all of the major leagues, they don't necessarily spend it attending sporting events, particularly when their teams are not of championship caliber.   Boston, Philly, Chicago, and yes St. Louis (which is on the list) on the other hand are great sports towns.  Buffalo which has been economically woeful and hemorrhaging population since the 1960's strongly supports it's 2 pro teams.  So much so that fans probably sacrifice too much for tickets at the expense of some other necessities.

The list identifies Denver as the No. 1 such market, citing more income is needed to support its 5 professional teams.  The reality is that Denver's support for all of its teams is consistently strong and solid.  This perhaps indicates that Denver residents may choose to drop a greater portion of their entertainment dollar on sports than let's say the theatre, philharmonic, or other forms of entertainment.


Not to drop a fly in the ointment here, but Tulsa would do better in higher level hockey than you might think.  Much hockey history in this city (more history than soccer).  Back when the Oilers had decent management and good teams, you couldn't buy a walkup ticket on game night.  Crappy ownership and management in the late 90s mired the team in mediocrity and fans left in droves.

Many die-hard hockey fans live in this city.

And fact of the matter is that AHL teams don't do much better attendance-wise than CHL teams do.  Tulsa's 4728 average attendance through this weekend (which is second in the CHL) would be about middle of the road for the AHL.  Hell, OKC's average attendance for Baron games is 3280 so far this season.

Do I think the NHL could work in Tulsa?  Maybe in 5 years.  It would be better to get an AHL team though and better owners.  Remember, hockey doesn't have the structured farm system that baseball has.

I'm not trying to knock soccer here.  I went to many Roughneck games back in the day.  I'm just saying Tulsa has an almost 90 year long history with hockey.
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« Reply #68 on: January 19, 2014, 07:37:15 pm »

Not to drop a fly in the ointment here, but Tulsa would do better in higher level hockey than you might think.  Much hockey history in this city (more history than soccer).  Back when the Oilers had decent management and good teams, you couldn't buy a walkup ticket on game night.  Crappy ownership and management in the late 90s mired the team in mediocrity and fans left in droves.

Many die-hard hockey fans live in this city.

And fact of the matter is that AHL teams don't do much better attendance-wise than CHL teams do.  Tulsa's 4728 average attendance through this weekend (which is second in the CHL) would be about middle of the road for the AHL.  Hell, OKC's average attendance for Baron games is 3280 so far this season.

Do I think the NHL could work in Tulsa?  Maybe in 5 years.  It would be better to get an AHL team though and better owners.  Remember, hockey doesn't have the structured farm system that baseball has.

I'm not trying to knock soccer here.  I went to many Roughneck games back in the day.  I'm just saying Tulsa has an almost 90 year long history with hockey.
Move up to the AHL and re-establish whatever Tulsa - OKC hockey rivalry previously existed.  The better drawing AHL teams consistently pull in 8K - 12K, so who knows it's possible that the upper half of the BOK could get some needed use. 

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Laramie
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« Reply #69 on: January 20, 2014, 12:45:38 pm »

Reunite Oklahoma City, San Antonio, Wichita & Tulsa (all once played together in the CHL) along with Texas (Cedar Park-Austin) and  Houston and you would have enough teams for one division in the American Hokey League.  All of these cities were once in the original CHL or its rebirth in the 90s.

You have newer arenas for ice hockey in Cedar Park-Austin (6,700), Houston (17,800), Oklahoma City (18,036), San Antonio (16,000), Wichita (13,450) and Tulsa (17,096).  If the AHL can adjust with its movement into Iowa, Oklahoma and Texas and bring back Omaha, NE & Wichita, KS you will have a more viable and economically feasible area of the league which should benefit travel.

The so-called dilemma you have in OKC is suppose to be scheduling.  A move back to the Chesapeake Energy Arena shouldn't be a scheduling nightmare.  The Thunder seldom use Saturday dates.   The Thunder have been enjoying 2.5 years of consecutive sellouts (18,203).  If Los Angeles Staples Center can schedule three basketball teams (NBA Lakers & Clippers), WNBA Sparks and the NHL (Kings)  in one building then why can't OKC figure a matrix scheduling to include ice hockey?  The Barons are playing in the Cox Convention Center (Old Myriad, 1972) 13,846 ice hockey capacity--across from the Peake.

I do agree with Hoss.  

Hockey has been a fixture in Tulsa.  The Icers, Ice Oilers were established well before the OKC Blazers came on the scene.  Oklahoma had one of the most fierce rivalries in minor league hockey.  Let's not underestimate Tulsa's potential for becoming an NHL city.   You would have instant rivals with Dallas, Chicago, Colorado, Minnesota and St. Louis.  Tulsa has a diverse fan base which could draw from neighboring Oklahoma City, Wichita & Fort Smith.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 12:53:31 pm by Laramie » Logged

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« Reply #70 on: November 10, 2015, 01:07:01 pm »



NASL will enter the Oklahoma City market in 2016; they will play at 6,500-seat Millers' Stadium  (Yukon High School).  Oklahoma City will have two franchises (USL & NASL) in a market of 1.4 million.

Quote
Sold Out Strategies, led by local OKC businessman Brad Lund, is hosting a press conference at Yukon High School on Tuesday to make the announcement. NASL Commissioner Bill Peterson will be there as well. Also joining is the main reason behind Oklahoma City finally getting over the hump in what has been an up and down journey to this point, Rayo Vallecano.


NASL to officially announce Oklahoma City franchise | NewsOK.com

Millers High School Stadium       https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkzDaPjfAkY
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« Reply #71 on: November 14, 2015, 02:06:01 pm »

What On Earth Is The NASL Doing?
Nov 13 2015 07:00 AM | Alex Schieferdecker in Articles
Divining the intentions of the NASL has always been more of an art than a science, but even seasoned NASL watchers were baffled by this week's announcement of new expansion club Rayo OKC.
http://northernpitch.com/_/minnesota-soccer-news/what-on-earth-is-the-nasl-doing-r607

***Ironic old NASL Tulsa Roughnecks highlights twenty seconds into the video***
http://www.rayookc.com/images/RayoElevationnomusic.mp4



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« Reply #72 on: August 05, 2016, 06:42:34 am »

Well, that escalated quickly... favorite quote about the situation in Rayo Oklahoma City (Yukon HS)...

"#RayoOKC lasted 268 days. Kim Kardashian was legally married to Kris Humphries for 653. #NASL"  Grin

Rayo OKC blowout of defending champs highlights big night in OKC soccer scene
By Chris Brannick Staff Writer cbrannick@oklahoman.com Published: July 17, 2016[/b]
http://newsok.com/rayo-okc-blowout-of-defending-champs-highlights-big-night-in-okc-soccer-scene-energy-continue-run-of-form/article/5509952
Quote
Yukon — Rayo OKC extended its unbeaten streak to six games after a stunning 3-0 win over the defending North American Soccer League champion New York Cosmos on Saturday in front of 4,621 fans at Miller Stadium.

Report: NASL's Rayo OKC loses coach, and more
by Mike Woitalla, August 5th, 2016
http://www.socceramerica.com/article/69849/nasl-rayo-okc-loses-coach-and-more.html
Quote
“Sold Out Strategies has parted ways with Rayo OKC,” Brad Lund, a part-owner of Sold Out Strategies told the Oklahoman. “I'm not going to go into a lot of details. It is time for SOS to focus its attention on other client portfolios.”

Rayo OKC is in fifth place of the overall standings with a 6-6-5 win-loss-tie record and just three points out of the playoff zone. But its majority owner, Spanish club Rayo Vallecano, announced after it was relegated from Spain's La Liga its intent to sell shares.

“Recent changes in administration have resulted in vast differences of opinion which could not be reconciled,” Marcina said.

MORE DETAIL FROM TWITTER....

    Scissortail Podcast @ScissortailPod

    1) Presa demanded that the team bus to every away match to save $. Good luck bussing to @PRFootballClub. Indy is closest at ~12 hrs away.
    6:13 AM - 5 Aug 2016

        2) B/c they no longer have anyone to install/remove the nexxfield, they want to play on the football field underneath that is too narrow.

              3) Did we mention they forced out the FO and head coach of a team in 3rd place on the table? They will try to operate with 2 coaches only.
                6:15 AM - 5 Aug 2016
« Last Edit: August 05, 2016, 06:58:15 am by TulsaRufnex » Logged

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davideinstein
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« Reply #73 on: August 05, 2016, 06:39:27 pm »

Soccer bubble is bursting.
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« Reply #74 on: August 31, 2016, 08:12:12 am »

Turf war?

Soccer: Rayo OKC playing surface removed by minority owner
by James Poling Published: August 30, 2016
http://newsok.com/soccer-rayo-okc-playing-surface-removed-by-minority-owner/article/5516004

Quote
The club initially filed a report last Wednesday with the Yukon Police Department regarding the missing turf pallets before learning Jones’ was responsible. The club said that it is no longer pursuing an investigation now that they know Jones has the turf.

“The removal of the turf was removed under (Jones’) authority in the middle of the night (Wednesday),” the club said in its official statement. “We still don’t know Mr. Jones’ intention for the turf or its whereabouts.
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