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July 22, 2018, 10:17:59 pm
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Author Topic: kendall whittier/lweis/6th/demolition  (Read 13530 times)
TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #75 on: April 20, 2017, 02:40:24 pm »

Good to see the new development around Whittier moving north. It will be a tough/unfriendly walk from there to the "Main Street" and there's no great way to cross the street to Las Americas, but will be good for the area. I thought they were considering putting an elderly home there among other proposals years ago.
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #76 on: March 06, 2018, 10:27:16 am »

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Kendall Whittier Main Street reaches $130 million in private reinvestment

Oklahoma Main Street Center is among 42 state coordinating programs around the nation


The numbers don’t lie. Kendall Whittier Main Street is booming.

Recent figures released by the Oklahoma Main Street Center show that $130 million in private reinvestment has been poured into Kendall Whittier Main Street since 2010, the year it was accepted into the state program.

“It’s been a mix of very meaningful rehabs of older historic properties and pretty welcome infill development at a somewhat large scale,” said Ed Sharrer, executive director of Kendall Whittier Main Street, a nonprofit that supports revitalization of the area. “It’s been a very beneficial mix.”

A subsidiary of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Oklahoma Main Street Center is among 42 state coordinating programs around the nation. At least 2,000 Main Streets in the country are committed to historic preservation-based community rehabilitation.

Recent construction in the Kendall Whittier area includes Red Brick Capital Management’s $2 million refurbishing of a 13,000-square-foot property next to Circle Cinema. Occupying the space is the nonprofit Growing Together Tulsa, HP Engineering and Orth Contemporary, an art gallery.

Also, Heirloom Rustic Ales opened its brewery in November at 2113 E. Admiral Blvd.


Earlier in 2017, TPC Studios injected about $2.5 million into renovating space for a new headquarters in the former home of Swinney Hardware, 32 S. Lewis Ave. Swinney had operated for 74 years there until its closing in 2008.

Since January 2013, a total of 36 new businesses have opened in the Kendall Whittier service area, representing 265 jobs and approaching $20 million in private investment, Sharrer said.

Whittier Square, the commercial core of the neighborhood at East Admiral Boulevard and South Lewis Avenue, is at about 95 percent occupancy, he said. Five years ago, it was 35 percent full.

“We’re actually running into something that we haven’t seen in decades, which is more demand than supply,” Sharrer said. “I don’t see that stopping any time soon. We’ve just become a very stable place for people to open a business and be successful.”




http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/realestate/kendall-whittier-main-street-reaches-million-in-private-reinvestment/article_7b5b5d61-dcd2-55b8-98ca-817facf8e6ae.html
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #77 on: March 06, 2018, 10:30:19 am »

Also:

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Kendall Whittier history
The Kendall Whittier neighborhood draws its name from two elementary schools built in the area in the 1910s.

In 1912, Kendall Elementary school was built at 715 S. Columbia Ave., adjacent to the Kendall College campus. The college was renamed the University of Tulsa in 1920. It is widely believed that the elementary school was named after the college, which was named for Henry Kendall, a Presbyterian minister.

Whittier Elementary School was built in 1916 at 68 N. Lewis Ave., on the northern edge of Whittier Square. The school was named after Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier.

The boundaries of the Kendall Whittier Main Street Program are Independence Street to 11th Street on Lewis Avenue; plus commercial properties along Admiral Boulevard, Third Street and Sixth Street from Utica Avenue to Columbia Avenue.

Source: Kendall Whittier Main Street

Kendall Whittier throughout the years:
http://www.tulsaworld.com/photovideo/slideshows/see-the-kendall-whittier-neighborhood-through-the-years/collection_03ce8147-ba82-5119-9c13-1fffba23cdb0.html
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Conan71
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« Reply #78 on: March 06, 2018, 10:54:31 am »

This is nice to see.  It's really undergone quite a transformation since I worked at Urban Tulsa back in the early 1990's when they were HQ'd in the KW.
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« Reply #79 on: June 01, 2018, 07:57:24 am »

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Up from the ashes: Use of fire-damaged building gives Kendall Whittier new life

Several years ago, a fire damaged a furniture refinishing company, slowing redevelopment east from Lewis Avenue along Admiral Boulevard.

But where others saw blight, May Yang saw opportunity.

Co-owner of Flash Flood Print Studios, a screen-printing company looking to expand, she is expected in June to move a couple of doors down into the formerly charred structure (2421 E. Admiral Blvd.), which is being refurbished to house her company’s new headquarters.

“They took a leap of faith and they signed a letter of intent on a burned-out building,” said Ed Sharrer, executive director of Kendall Whittier Main Street, a nonprofit that supports revitalization of the area. “But that letter of intent for a long-term lease, along with a bit of personal collateral on behalf of the property owner, allowed them to go to their bank and get the financing to rehab the facility. I can literally say that building would still be sitting there as an eyesore, as a deterrent to investment, if it wasn’t for May.”

Moving in next month just west of Flash Flood will be three co-tenants: Method Architecture, a new business, Blue Star Integrative Studio, a design firm relocating from downtown, and another company that hasn’t been announced.

“The Method group is moving into a space where the owner feels comfortable in investing in his property thanks to what’s happening next door,” Sharrer said. “This is really the chain reaction of taking what was the worst property on the block and making it the best one, and it immediately starting to snowball. There was pent-up demand for space here, and getting this one piece of the puzzle allowed lots of things to fall in place.”

Flash Flood’s new 4,000-square-foot space will nearly triple the area of its previous venue.

“We got to a point where we were outgrowing our current space and we really wanted to stay over here,” Yang said.

She started Flash Flood with Nick Nold nearly six years ago. They came to Kendall Whittier in the summer of 2015.

“We were really attracted to the area because we thought there was a lot of creative energy here,” Yang said. “… We felt like we knew our neighbors all the time and you can walk into other businesses on a daily basis, say hello to everybody and develop relationships with the people you are next-door to.”

Josh Kunkel is founder and director of Method Architecture, which employs five people. Two of the five are Spanish-speaking associates from Venezuela and Columbia.

“Kendall Whittier has a lot going for it,” Kunkel said. “There is a lot of positive energy. It also is one of the true neighborhood communities where you have everything represented. You can get a haircut. You can go out to eat at a bunch of different places. You can bank. You can shop. You can get your groceries. You can live all within the district.

“That tied in to what we believe about design. Places are for people. That’s what we design for.”

Figures released this year by the Oklahoma Main Street Center indicate that $130 million in private reinvestment has been poured into Kendall Whittier Main Street since 2010, the year it was accepted into the state program.

In December 2012, only 35 percent of the buildings were occupied two blocks either side from Lewis Avenue on Admiral Boulevard and from Interstate 244 to First Street, Sharrer said.

Once new tenants such as Method and Blue Star move into the neighborhood, the occupancy rate will be nearly 97 percent, he said.

“It’s been unbelievably gratifying,” Sharrer said. “We’re just fortunate that little by little we keep adding folks.”


http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/realestate/up-from-the-ashes-use-of-fire-damaged-building-gives/article_43e47cf4-99c8-5ebd-95a7-225fe929e4c9.html
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TulsaGoldenHurriCAN
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« Reply #80 on: June 01, 2018, 08:15:20 am »

It's nice to see the continued development of this area. The area overall (greater Kendall-Whittier and Pearl) still have a long way to go but it is neat to see things like occupancy rate reaching 97% in the area and this:

Quote
Figures released this year by the Oklahoma Main Street Center indicate that $130 million in private reinvestment has been poured into Kendall Whittier Main Street since 2010, the year it was accepted into the state program.

It is good that it has been accepted into the state main street program which seems to have helped some of the smaller main streets around improve. Hopefully that will further spur investment. Mostly, it will be driven by the market and demand. Real estate in the area remains cheap (albeit hard to come by!), and with rent/occupancy doing so well it is a matter of time before revitalization really boosts the area. It's already vastly better than 5 or 10 years ago.


I'm starting to see a lot more $100k/$150k+ houses listed in the area and as those sell it legitimizes the market so investors can go in,  buy a dilapidated house for around $40k-$80k, put in $50-$80k and sell at a profit. In the past, that was incredibly difficult when people in that price range wouldn't think of moving to areas like that.
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« Reply #81 on: June 01, 2018, 10:09:08 am »

It's nice to see the continued development of this area. The area overall (greater Kendall-Whittier and Pearl) still have a long way to go but it is neat to see things like occupancy rate reaching 97% in the area and this:

It is good that it has been accepted into the state main street program which seems to have helped some of the smaller main streets around improve. Hopefully that will further spur investment. Mostly, it will be driven by the market and demand. Real estate in the area remains cheap (albeit hard to come by!), and with rent/occupancy doing so well it is a matter of time before revitalization really boosts the area. It's already vastly better than 5 or 10 years ago.


I'm starting to see a lot more $100k/$150k+ houses listed in the area and as those sell it legitimizes the market so investors can go in,  buy a dilapidated house for around $40k-$80k, put in $50-$80k and sell at a profit. In the past, that was incredibly difficult when people in that price range wouldn't think of moving to areas like that.

I remember a friend was looking at buying a house at 4th & Lewis about 5 years ago and it was $50k.  Decent house too.  I know the term is overused but I've always said that whole area from the Pearl to TU has the most potential to gentrify and already has in some areas.  The next frontier will be neighborhoods north of 244 but that is still a ways off.
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« Reply #82 on: June 01, 2018, 10:25:57 am »

I remember a friend was looking at buying a house at 4th & Lewis about 5 years ago and it was $50k.  Decent house too.  I know the term is overused but I've always said that whole area from the Pearl to TU has the most potential to gentrify and already has in some areas.  The next frontier will be neighborhoods north of 244 but that is still a ways off.

My great grandmother owned a lot of buildings in Kendall-Whitter, bought them up during the Great Depression. She had a couple of apartment buildings with storefronts, several stores and a dozen or more houses. My grandparents sold it all off for basically nothing in the 80s and 90s when the neighborhood had fallen apart.
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RecycleMichael
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« Reply #83 on: June 04, 2018, 02:23:31 pm »

I have a couple of small lots that need to be regularly weed-eated and mowed in Kendall Whittier.

I don't want to hire some big company and prefer some neighborhood kid.
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