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May 27, 2020, 03:58:51 am
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Author Topic: (PROJECT) A Gathering Place For Tulsa  (Read 367120 times)
patric
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« Reply #1230 on: May 08, 2019, 03:39:09 pm »

and as far as the whole gun thing is concerned, I think they might fall under:

as being able to prohibit guns   ??
(also definitely not a lawyer)



Off-duty deputy with gun asked to leave theme park
https://kfor.com/2019/05/06/off-duty-deputy-with-gun-asked-to-leave-theme-park/
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SXSW
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« Reply #1231 on: May 11, 2019, 08:56:52 am »

Vista restaurant opens May 20

https://www.tulsaworld.com/entertainment/dining/new-gathering-place-restaurant-brings-elevated-cuisine-amazing-views-to/article_cd2217d0-e3dc-5464-80c5-974d13af3aa5.html
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #1232 on: May 21, 2019, 05:15:16 pm »

Corps of Engineers says that Keystone lake has about 250,000 cubic feet per second coming into lake from rain over the last few days.  When we drove over the river a couple days ago, it was very full.  They are releasing water at around 123,000 cubic feet per second.  News said that is the most they can dump without flooding Tulsa!   Looks like they can release up to almost 300,000 cu ft/min.  Hope they don't have to go that far!

Can you visualize The Gathering Place under 6 ft of rushing river water?

I hope they have enough room for all that extra!   Level is 750 ft today.   754 is top of flood pool.  Flood control pool is filled with 0.8" rain over the watershed.  Getting close...we only got about 5 or 6" over a lot of the watershed...

http://www.swt-wc.usace.army.mil/KEYS.lakepage.html


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« Reply #1233 on: May 21, 2019, 09:43:14 pm »

Corps of Engineers says that Keystone lake has about 250,000 cubic feet per second coming into lake from rain over the last few days.  When we drove over the river a couple days ago, it was very full.  They are releasing water at around 123,000 cubic feet per second.  News said that is the most they can dump without flooding Tulsa!   Looks like they can release up to almost 300,000 cu ft/min.  Hope they don't have to go that far!

Can you visualize The Gathering Place under 6 ft of rushing river water?

I hope they have enough room for all that extra!   Level is 750 ft today.   754 is top of flood pool.  Flood control pool is filled with 0.8" rain over the watershed.  Getting close...we only got about 5 or 6" over a lot of the watershed...

http://www.swt-wc.usace.army.mil/KEYS.lakepage.html




They're increasing it to 160,000 cfs tonight. The city is implementing their emergency flood plans (not sure what that entails). I saw something saying that the river is expected to rise to what is considered flood levels. I also wasn't around back in the 80s, but someone told me they were releasing at 300,000 cfs during the historic Tulsa floods.
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BKDotCom
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« Reply #1234 on: May 22, 2019, 08:42:06 am »

Release data table
http://www.swt-wc.usace.army.mil/webdata/gagedata/KEYO2.current.html

Visual Diagram
http://www.swt-wc.usace.army.mil/KEYS.lakepage.html

167,000 cfs right now
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swake
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« Reply #1235 on: May 22, 2019, 10:25:50 am »

The Corp is going to up the release to 215,000 cfs, Tulsa is now going to flood, the river is expected to reach 21 feet near downtown at this release rate.

The release in 1986 topped out at 307,000 in the 1986 flood with a river crest of 25.2 feet.
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ELG4America
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« Reply #1236 on: May 22, 2019, 10:47:49 am »

Its been so long since we've had a major flood that locals aren't paying much attention. Oddly, people in other cities have noticed. Here's an article from Meshek and associates aimed at Houston.

https://meshekengr.com/houstons-leaders-learn-tulsa-hurricane-harvey/

There's a KOTV article from 2011(?) where the Corps was talking about their concerns over the structural integrity of Keystone. Essentially they said the worst case scenario was an over-topping of the dam which would cause a total failure. Because of that, expect the Corps to prioritize dam integrity at Keystone over down stream flood prevention. They'll sacrifice the 500 year flood plain that includes thousands of homes to prevent the complete catastrophe that would be a dam failure.

Here's the good news: Tulsa has spent 43 years and countless Millions preparing for this. The Corps says we are one of the best prepared cities in the country. And, should some calamity befall parts of the city, it will harden our resolve to make our plans even better for the next major flood event.
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ELG4America
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« Reply #1237 on: May 22, 2019, 11:15:39 am »

Here is the FEMA portal to see flood maps. The "500-year" event maps are pretty terrifying.

https://msc.fema.gov/portal/search

And here is a 1982 100-year flood map.

https://dc.library.okstate.edu/digital/collection/OKMaps/id/8278/rec/2

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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #1238 on: May 22, 2019, 11:18:04 am »

They're increasing it to 160,000 cfs tonight. The city is implementing their emergency flood plans (not sure what that entails). I saw something saying that the river is expected to rise to what is considered flood levels. I also wasn't around back in the 80s, but someone told me they were releasing at 300,000 cfs during the historic Tulsa floods.


1986 was last big one.  Lost a lot of cool stuff to the flood.

Just took a little drive from Memorial over the bridge - there was a large crowd on the old bridge looking.  Over to Riverside, Jenks and up Riverside to I-44.  There is water just about ready to come onto some of the bank area...maybe another foot to 18" on some of it.  We are gonna get wet.  While at Riverwalk, looking around, heard a guy at the rail overlooking the river talking on phone saying something about how they are gonna have to get sandbags in place somewhere.  I think he is a little bit too late on that one.

We have done a lot to help with the local drainage situation, but this one is gonna be big due to the rest of the watershed.  Western KS on down this way has had huge rains, too!

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"So he brandished a gun, never shot anyone or anything right?"  --TeeDub, 17 Feb 2018.

I don’t share my thoughts because I think it will change the minds of people who think differently.  I share my thoughts to show the people who already think like me that they are not alone.
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« Reply #1239 on: May 22, 2019, 11:39:14 am »

 While at Riverwalk, looking around, heard a guy at the rail overlooking the river talking on phone saying something about how they are gonna have to get sandbags in place somewhere.  I think he is a little bit too late on that one.

I want to say that Jenks requires buildings in flood areas, like Riverwalk, to be built at one foot above the 300 year flood level. I'm sure that's under the 500 year level.

It seems the Creek Nation didn't do that as Riverspirit is closing at 2:00 today.
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Laramie
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« Reply #1240 on: May 22, 2019, 06:09:29 pm »


               


Our hope & prayers are with you throughout this season of storms & tornadoes.
Stay safe fellow Tulsans.

Laramie & the Oklahoma City community.
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« Reply #1241 on: May 22, 2019, 08:40:47 pm »

Word on the street is the corp will increase the release of water from Keystone dam to 305,000 cfs. 215,000 cfs was the least they could do to prevent the water from rising above the dam and now with these new storms tonight they are needing to increase it to 305,000. Not sure when that's supposed to happen but I hear that's the plan.
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Conan71
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« Reply #1242 on: May 22, 2019, 10:26:35 pm »

I want to say that Jenks requires buildings in flood areas, like Riverwalk, to be built at one foot above the 300 year flood level. I'm sure that's under the 500 year level.

It seems the Creek Nation didn't do that as Riverspirit is closing at 2:00 today.

If I understand correctly, the River Spirit complex is in a 100 year flood plain.  I wonder if some people figured we would never see levels like 1986 again with better stream data collection abilities upstream.  Naturally, none of that is relevant in preventing the need for huge releases when you have so much water coming at you.

My son-in-law said on the part of the property he and my daughter are on is 12" above the 500' flood plain near the power plant on 116th.  That doesn't give me much confidence but he sent an overlay of the 1986 flood over the current satellite imagery and looks like most of the ranch property will be safe.  I know their house is up there a bit higher but I worry about their wedding barn getting inundated and the access road to it flooding if they need to get out.

There's a dam on the pond near their house which became impassable in the short amount of time it took my wife and I to drive from 61st & Harvard to there when we were in Tulsa a few weeks ago.  My biggest fear is if water backs up on the lower areas of the property which would be the alternate escape route, how they would get out of there if the water is rushing over the dam on the property.

They are sharp kids and they won't be stupid but it sure makes me nervous.  I remember '84 and '86 all too well.  

We will have our turn soon enough when the summer monsoons come over the burned area from last summer's Ute Park fire.  Our village is relatively safe, but we will have a lot of mud and rock slides in the canyon west of town on US 64 that goes to Eagle Nest which closes 64 for hours.  It's a win/lose situation- stranded motorists have nothing to do but wander about and hopefully visit our brewpub for a bite to eat and a pint.

All of you please be safe- Godspeed!
« Last Edit: May 22, 2019, 10:34:45 pm by Conan71 » Logged

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« Reply #1243 on: May 23, 2019, 08:35:41 am »

Corps website shows that they upped the outflow to 222,000 cf/s sometime overnight or this morning. The inflow is estimated at 280,000 cf/s and the flood pool is at 97.56% capacity. Kaw Lake which is immediately above Keystone is at 103% of capacity and rising. Hopefully the corps will be able to go up to ~250,000 or so and not have to reach the ~300,000 that would put huge portions of the area at risk.

Anyone hear of any issues with flooding in Bixby? Its the area I've been most concerned about.
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Vision 2025
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« Reply #1244 on: May 23, 2019, 09:25:02 am »

I drove through Bixby this morning and Memorial was dry and Highway 64 was open going toward Haskell.  Only direct impact I noticed was the OT at 151st and Memorial is closed.
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