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November 24, 2017, 08:03:45 pm
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Author Topic: "The Pearl" an area that will go down in History as a turning point in Tulsa  (Read 51023 times)
PonderInc
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« Reply #330 on: January 05, 2017, 01:35:49 pm »

Another thing that really hurts the Pearl District is that so much of it is in the flood plain.  If you want to build anything, or you're worried about fixing up existing buildings, it sort of puts a damper on investment.  We have never fully implemented the Elm Creek Drainage plan, which if completed, would open up a lot of prime real estate to development. (It would turn some areas into ponds/parkland, but overall, it would open up hundreds of parcels to investment and improvement, as far southwest as 18th and Baltimore and as far east as Zunis Ave.)

I heard a rumor that the feds declined our application that would have funded phase 2 of the Elm Creek plan (to build the west detention pond) because the Indian Health Center had bought up most of the surrounding property.  It seems the feds want their dollars to benefit multiple property owners.  Not just a single entity.

One of the most beautiful views of downtown can be seen as you travel west on 6th street near Peoria.  Plus, it's a short couple minutes by bike into downtown. The Pearl District has enormous potential if we could solve the flood problems.
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« Reply #331 on: January 05, 2017, 04:06:12 pm »

Another thing that really hurts the Pearl District is that so much of it is in the flood plain.  If you want to build anything, or you're worried about fixing up existing buildings, it sort of puts a damper on investment.  We have never fully implemented the Elm Creek Drainage plan, which if completed, would open up a lot of prime real estate to development. (It would turn some areas into ponds/parkland, but overall, it would open up hundreds of parcels to investment and improvement, as far southwest as 18th and Baltimore and as far east as Zunis Ave.)

I heard a rumor that the feds declined our application that would have funded phase 2 of the Elm Creek plan (to build the west detention pond) because the Indian Health Center had bought up most of the surrounding property.  It seems the feds want their dollars to benefit multiple property owners.  Not just a single entity.

One of the most beautiful views of downtown can be seen as you travel west on 6th street near Peoria.  Plus, it's a short couple minutes by bike into downtown. The Pearl District has enormous potential if we could solve the flood problems.

And given our history with solving flood problems, I'm not sure why it's not already done.  If we're horrible in many other things, we proved that we know our smile when it comes to flood mitigation.  Even if it took 3 100-year flood events to force our hand.
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Bamboo World
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« Reply #332 on: March 02, 2017, 04:24:42 pm »



Another thing that really hurts the Pearl District is that so much of it is in the flood plain.  If you want to build anything, or you're worried about fixing up existing buildings, it sort of puts a damper on investment...


The Elm Creek floodplain doesn't seem to be hurting or hindering this multi-story, mixed-use proposal:  http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/realestate/mixed-used-project-being-proposed-for-pearl-district/article_5007355a-4120-5da1-a113-5979a7806c4d.html

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PonderInc
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« Reply #333 on: March 03, 2017, 11:32:41 am »

We'll know when we see a rendering that really shows the sidewalk perspective.  Trader Joes is raised up several feet because of flood plain issues.  It makes it really hard to be an asset to the sidewalk when you're 3-4 feet above it. (Also when you put the entrance in the rear, but that's another story.)

I've experienced great "sidewalks" that incorporate old loading docks as part of the pedestrian path (Denver, Milwaukee, etc have these kinds of places) but that works best when you have a row of raised buildings.  That way, you can go up the stairs (or ramp) and then walk along the raised sidewalk. 

It's not as nice when you have a blank wall along the sidewalk because of flood concerns, and not enough incentive to go up the stairs.  We'll see how they handle this.
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Bamboo World
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« Reply #334 on: March 03, 2017, 05:40:03 pm »


We'll know when we see a rendering that really shows the sidewalk perspective.  Trader Joes is raised up several feet because of flood plain issues.  It makes it really hard to be an asset to the sidewalk when you're 3-4 feet above it. (Also when you put the entrance in the rear, but that's another story.)

I've experienced great "sidewalks" that incorporate old loading docks as part of the pedestrian path (Denver, Milwaukee, etc have these kinds of places) but that works best when you have a row of raised buildings.  That way, you can go up the stairs (or ramp) and then walk along the raised sidewalk.  

It's not as nice when you have a blank wall along the sidewalk because of flood concerns, and not enough incentive to go up the stairs.  We'll see how they handle this.


Here's what the drawings indicate:  "Ground" floor level raised about 3.5 to 4 feet above the public sidewalk at the north end of Phase 1, and about 1.5 to 2 feet above the public sidewalk at the south end of Phase 1.  A raised "sidewalk" or walkway along the east facade of the building, mostly covered by the projecting living rooms and balconies of the apartments above.

Unless the owner intends to fence and gate off the raised walkway, pedestrians should be able to walk along the lower public sidewalk near the curb or on the raised walkway along front of the building, something akin to a loading dock.  A portion of the street-facing wall is shown as a blank wall (the east wall of the toilets and janitor room), but the drawings indicate windows and doors along most of the street-facing wall.

We'll see if it gets built the way it is drawn...
  
« Last Edit: March 03, 2017, 07:05:23 pm by Bamboo World » Logged
Tulsasaurus Rex
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« Reply #335 on: May 10, 2017, 01:35:20 pm »

Tulsa Development Authority asks for ideas to redevelop Pearl District.

Proposals are due in October.

http://ktul.com/news/local/tulsa-development-authority-asks-for-ideas-to-redevelop-pearl-district
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AdamsHall
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« Reply #336 on: May 11, 2017, 07:59:18 am »

Tulsa Development Authority asks for ideas to redevelop Pearl District.

Proposals are due in October.

http://ktul.com/news/local/tulsa-development-authority-asks-for-ideas-to-redevelop-pearl-district

Never mind.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 05:13:54 pm by AdamsHall » Logged
Tulsasaurus Rex
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« Reply #337 on: May 19, 2017, 02:56:09 pm »

Something's going on across 6th street from the Phoenix.


https://mobile.twitter.com/ONEArchitecture/status/865625181393264642
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