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Author Topic: (PROJECT) Hartford Building for TU/OU Medical School  (Read 18741 times)
jacobi
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« Reply #60 on: December 09, 2011, 04:20:27 pm »

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There is no synergy created with any of the existing higher education facilities downtown.

OSU-tulsa is three blocks north.
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LandArchPoke
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« Reply #61 on: December 21, 2011, 10:47:03 pm »

Still wondering, why this particular building/site?  Is it just because they can get the building for a good price in a downtown location?

There is no synergy created with any of the existing higher education facilities downtown.  Why not by OSU Med Center, or by TCC which has long-range plans to build a health sciences building near 10th & Cincinnati?

I totally on this. It really is another way Tulsa is spreading everything all over the place and not trying to cluster things together.

Also, will the be designated a school or a hospital? What does this do with our liquor laws and could the possibly stunt growth in the East Village or the Blue Dome (granted I know this will have a good impact some areas, but with this becoming on of the area better nightlife areas this could be a thorn in that kind of development). A similar thing happened in Bricktown when the UCO Jazz Lab or whatever it was opened in Bricktown.
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« Reply #62 on: December 21, 2011, 11:21:21 pm »

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I totally on this. It really is another way Tulsa is spreading everything all over the place and not trying to cluster things together.

Funny that you say that, because I've seen people from OKC talk about how everything there is too spread out and that Tulsa has done a really good job at keeping things dense.

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Also, will the be designated a school or a hospital? What does this do with our liquor laws and could the possibly stunt growth in the East Village or the Blue Dome (granted I know this will have a good impact some areas, but with this becoming on of the area better nightlife areas this could be a thorn in that kind of development). A similar thing happened in Bricktown when the UCO Jazz Lab or whatever it was opened in Bricktown.

That's an intersesting issue that I hadn't thought about. It's all the more reason of why we need to change our backwards and overly strict liquor laws. It's so frustrating to see something coming along, only to be slammed in the face by one of our stupid laws. Hopefully, that is not the case here.
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jacobi
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« Reply #63 on: December 21, 2011, 11:26:42 pm »

I can't really imagine it will affect the district development in anything but a good way.  Remember that you can sell booze if you sell food which most places in the blue dome do.  Also,  in the area immediately surrounding I would look for mOre housing to spring up, not bars.  They need to study anyway! Smiley
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« Reply #64 on: December 21, 2011, 11:31:37 pm »

I can't really imagine it will affect the district development in anything but a good way.  Remember that you can sell booze if you sell food which most places in the blue dome do.  Also,  in the area immediately surrounding I would look for mOre housing to spring up, not bars.  They need to study anyway! Smiley


And hopefully that is how this plays out. I would love to see more housing right around there.

I definitely agree that this is a positive development for Tulsa. Many of us on her have talked about how we want an urban downtown college. Here it is being given to us, and collectively I am very excited about it.
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« Reply #65 on: December 21, 2011, 11:36:38 pm »

Funny that you say that, because I've seen people from OKC talk about how everything there is too spread out and that Tulsa has done a really good job at keeping things dense.

That's an intersesting issue that I hadn't thought about. It's all the more reason of why we need to change our backwards and overly strict liquor laws. It's so frustrating to see something coming along, only to be slammed in the face by one of our stupid laws. Hopefully, that is not the case here.

I'm curious, What do they think we've done a good job at keeping dense? Our development in general I would say yes... but I was talking more university/research wise. I would love to see this go in conjunction with OSU Med and create a research and bio tech area where OSU Medical Center and their properties on the west bank are. OSU/TU/OU could all build say a Cancer Center, Children's Hospital, Spine, and others and they could work together on the fundraising portion to get the centers built then OSU runs their program and OU/TU runs their program out of the build. Win Win for all the universities in my opinion. In a few years we could have as nice of a medical research district as the OU Health Center in OKC.

On the liquor laws: Why can't we have a clause written into it that excludes URBAN districts... say places like Downtown, Brookside, Cherry Street, but then keeps everyone else happy because it keeps the status quo pretty much but allows our urban areas to not be so restricted. Not sure how easy this would be though.
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ZYX
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« Reply #66 on: December 22, 2011, 12:05:23 am »

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I'm curious, What do they think we've done a good job at keeping dense? Our development in general I would say yes... but I was talking more university/research wise. I would love to see this go in conjunction with OSU Med and create a research and bio tech area where OSU Medical Center and their properties on the west bank are. OSU/TU/OU could all build say a Cancer Center, Children's Hospital, Spine, and others and they could work together on the fundraising portion to get the centers built then OSU runs their program and OU/TU runs their program out of the build. Win Win for all the universities in my opinion. In a few years we could have as nice of a medical research district as the OU Health Center in OKC.

They were more referring to general neighborhood districts, not specifically medical or anything like that. As far as normal urban districts, OKC has Bricktown, CBD, C2S (not really a district yet, but a place that is already affecting development), Paseo, Deep Deuce, Midtown (much smaller than what would be considered Tulsa's), and several more. As main areas of new development, Tulsa pretty much has Blue Dome, Brady, and the CBD. Existing and constantly improving areas would be Cherry Street and Brookside.
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« Reply #67 on: December 22, 2011, 07:18:12 am »

They were more referring to general neighborhood districts, not specifically medical or anything like that. As far as normal urban districts, OKC has Bricktown, CBD, C2S (not really a district yet, but a place that is already affecting development), Paseo, Deep Deuce, Midtown (much smaller than what would be considered Tulsa's), and several more. As main areas of new development, Tulsa pretty much has Blue Dome, Brady, and the CBD. Existing and constantly improving areas would be Cherry Street and Brookside.

I would also include for Tulsa those areas in Tulsa county (which would still be smaller in land size and population than OKC) like the River District in Jenks and the Aquarium, its downtown/antique district, Broken Arrows downtown and Bass Pro, and Sand Springs downtown.  One can only imagine what it would have been like if in this smaller area we had not had to compete with very nearby suburbs for the Aquarium, Bass Pro, and Riverwalk... and lost, but instead had all that and more on the west bank by downtown as a for instance.  We also have a lot of great art galleries and antique stores scattered in numerous districts and towns, but no real arts district like the Paseo.   Though I am excited about having a "museum district" downtown in a few years. 

But yes I too lament that we have so many different medical schools and such spread around different areas, and even the individual schools themselves are not concentrated. 

Does OKC have anything like our TCC and its multiple campuses thats paid for by the city/county? 
« Last Edit: December 22, 2011, 07:27:56 am by TheArtist » Logged

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« Reply #68 on: December 22, 2011, 09:18:37 am »

They were more referring to general neighborhood districts, not specifically medical or anything like that. As far as normal urban districts, OKC has Bricktown, CBD, C2S (not really a district yet, but a place that is already affecting development), Paseo, Deep Deuce, Midtown (much smaller than what would be considered Tulsa's), and several more. As main areas of new development, Tulsa pretty much has Blue Dome, Brady, and the CBD. Existing and constantly improving areas would be Cherry Street and Brookside.

You forgot Automobile Alley & the Plaza District.  Automobile Alley coupled with coupled with nearby Midtown is probably my favorite part of OKC.  I also really like the Plaza District, its a very progressive area that has developed some great shops, creative firms and great bones for renovating old homes.
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« Reply #69 on: December 22, 2011, 11:48:01 am »

 
Does OKC have anything like our TCC and its multiple campuses thats paid for by the city/county? 

They have a single campus community college, OCCC, located near the airport in SW OKC.  I'm not sure how it's funded but TCC is much larger and has more impressive facilities.  It is too bad all of the 30,000+ students are not at the downtown campus.. They also have a single campus vo-tech near the zoo similar to Tulsa Tech.
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« Reply #70 on: December 22, 2011, 12:05:45 pm »

They have a single campus community college, OCCC, located near the airport in SW OKC.  I'm not sure how it's funded but TCC is much larger and has more impressive facilities.  It is too bad all of the 30,000+ students are not at the downtown campus.. They also have a single campus vo-tech near the zoo similar to Tulsa Tech.

I've been to OCCC before. Only to the pool for swim meets. They have very nice facilities for that.

The problem with having all of TCC downtown, is that they have so many concurrent enrollment students. It would not be feasible for kids from my high school out in Bixby to commute to downtown and back every day. That's a heck of a lot of gas money.
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« Reply #71 on: December 22, 2011, 01:52:57 pm »

  What I was curious about was the comparative amount of city and state dollars each city gets/puts in for higher education.  For a long time it appeared to me that A. Tulsa wasn't allowed to have a publicly funded, graduate university in the city.  B. To make up for a lot of it, (while continuing to fund universities in other cities), we also had to dip back into our pockets again to fund TCC and the Vo-Tech system so we could have at least something here.  Hence rather than having a large state funded university, we have one of the largest Jr Colleges in this region of the country.  And now we have the scattered graduate universities that still aren't really, "real" campuses offering a broad range of programs and with housing and such. 

Do the people of OKC spend as much of their tax dollars on higher ed?  And whether yes or no, where does that money go?
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« Reply #72 on: June 21, 2012, 05:05:52 pm »

From todays World:

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Oxley Foundation gives $30 million for proposed Tulsa School of Community Medicine
 
OU President David Boren speaks at the Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Center Thursday. MIKE SIMONS/Tulsa World

By WAYNE GREENE World Senior Writer
Published: 6/21/2012  2:21 PM
Last Modified: 6/21/2012  3:11 PM


The Oxley Foundation made a five-year $30 million commitment Thursday to the proposed Tulsa School of Community Medicine.

The foundation will give $7.5 million for start-up costs and a $7.5 million dollar-for-dollar endowment challenge grant to the project's two partners -- the University of Tulsa and the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa.

"This gift represents the largest contribution we have ever undertaken," said R.H. Harbaugh, trustee of the Oxley Foundation. "The future Tulsa School of Community Medicine and the partnership from which it was born will make our community healthier, stronger and a more attractive place for medical professionals to learn and live.

"This is an historic day for all Tulsans, and we are so pleased to be a part of it."

TU President Steadman Upham, OU President David Boren and OU-Tulsa President Gerard Clancy presented Harbaugh and Oxley Foundation Program Officer Konnie Boulter with white lab coats as symbolic gifts to mark the commitment.

The 11:30 a.m. announcement at the Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Clinic attracted a large crowd of local leaders, including Mayor Dewey Bartlett, Tulsa Metro Chamber President Mike Neal, state Rep. Jabar Schumate, regents and trustees from OU and TU and several Tulsa physicians.

Boren said the gift marks as "transformational moment" for the school and Tulsa.

The new school will be targeted at training primary care physicians to treat underserved areas, especially poor parts of Tulsa.

Forty percent of the city's population live in a area with only 4 percent of the physicians, and north Tulsans on average have a life expectancy seven years shorter than their south Tulsa neighbors, Boren said.

"We really felt a moral imperative ... to do something about it, and that's what we celebrate today because we're going to create a future far different from our present course," Boren said.

For decades, OU has been graduating physicians at its Tulsa school. The students spent their first two years of medical school studying pure science at Oklahoma City's OU Health Sciences Center and the second two years in clinical instructions in Tulsa.

When the new school opens, OU-Tulsa will have a new partner and a four-year mission.

Read more from this Tulsa World article at http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=17&articleid=20120621_17_0_TheOxl19594

Put's a spring in my step!
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« Reply #73 on: June 21, 2012, 06:13:16 pm »

This is really good for Tulsa and healthcare in this region overall. I know several physicians in this program who speak very highly of it.
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« Reply #74 on: February 14, 2013, 11:39:25 am »

Nope.

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TU won't locate community medical school downtown

By SHANNON MUCHMORE World Staff Writer
Published: 2/14/2013  11:02 AM
Last Modified: 2/14/2013  11:02 AM


The University of Tulsa will not complete the purchase of downtown Tulsa's Hartford Building, which was to serve as the home of the planned Tulsa School of Community Medicine.

The school will instead be located at TU and the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa Schusterman campus.

Both universities remain committed to the school and it's mission, according to a statement from TU.

"Our needs, our partnership and our mission for the medical school in Tulsa remain the same," TU President Steadman Upham said in the statement. "Only the location is changing, and it is doing so in a way that allows for more rapid opening of the Tulsa School of Community Medicine."

The first class is expected to be admitted in fall 2015.

The cost for acquiring and redeveloping the building became prohibitive as the facility requirements became more detailed, according to the statement.

The redevelopment agreement between TU and the Tulsa Development Authority was terminated Thursday morning at a meeting of the authority.

Read more from this Tulsa World article at http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=17&articleid=20130214_17_0_TheUni313925
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