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November 17, 2018, 05:50:52 am
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Author Topic: More bikes on the road  (Read 4844 times)
jacobi
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« on: August 28, 2011, 08:37:04 pm »

I realize that I have no numbers to back me up on this, but...

It seems to me that there are far more people out on the road on bicycle these days.  I realize that this is comepletely subjective.  Has anyone else felt this way?  It makes me feel really good that the usage is up and if some solid numbers were put together, it might push forward some bike lane demarcations.

Thoughts?

Does anyone have numbers on this?  Is there a way to even go about doing numbers on this?
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Conan71
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2011, 08:43:24 pm »

I realize that I have no numbers to back me up on this, but...

It seems to me that there are far more people out on the road on bicycle these days.  I realize that this is comepletely subjective.  Has anyone else felt this way?  It makes me feel really good that the usage is up and if some solid numbers were put together, it might push forward some bike lane demarcations.

Thoughts?

Does anyone have numbers on this?  Is there a way to even go about doing numbers on this?

I dunno, just spent 48 hours around 30,000 other cycling enthusiasts in Wichita Falls, Tx for Hotter 'N' Hell Hundred edition 30 Wink  I do think Tulsa has become one of the more cycling-friendly cities in the country, rivaling Portland or Denver.  Tulsa's geographic profile works good for commuting, as you can be anywhere in 1 hour or less, depending on how stout a rider you are.

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jacobi
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2011, 08:54:09 pm »

Yeah.  I love to ride, even in the heat, but I just really cou'dn't see myself ever wanting to get that personally aquainted with that part of texas.   We are a certified bike friendly community.  I own a car, but try not to use it, as I can get around on bike.

Tulsa has a great begining set of trails, riverparks being the crown jewel.They just need to be expanded and augmented.  Also, maybe mor water fountains near NSU BA.  Getting out there you realize that you should have brought your own water.
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ZYX
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2011, 09:27:22 pm »

I have also noticed that there constantly seem to be more bikes on the road. Out here in Bixby, a bunch of cyclists get together and ride on Thursday mornings. This is all welcome news to me, and I can't wait until we see a real bike lane system.
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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2011, 07:23:38 am »

I dunno, just spent 48 hours around 30,000 other cycling enthusiasts in Wichita Falls, Tx for Hotter 'N' Hell Hundred edition 30 Wink  I do think Tulsa has become one of the more cycling-friendly cities in the country, rivaling Portland or Denver.  Tulsa's geographic profile works good for commuting, as you can be anywhere in 1 hour or less, depending on how stout a rider you are.

I had to chuckle a little bit over Conan's Portland reference. I just got back from a week in Portland. The bicycle infrastructure was beyond anything I expected, even having heard/read about it. Most major thoroughfares had bike lanes (created by reducing the road from four lanes to two, plus bike lanes and parking). Separate bike trails criss-crossed the city.  There were thousands of bicyclists everywhere, and drivers were used to coexisting with them.  My daughter explained that there were three levels of cyclists there and infrastructure to accommodate them.  The timid cyclist can use the separate trails and get around pretty well.  The cautiously assertive cyclist can use the trails and the bike lanes.  The bold assertive cyclist can take their lane anywhere. 

Our trail system is pretty good, but there are significant gaps.  The only bike lane I've seen is on Archer and is mainly used to store broken glass.  The bike routes aren't bad, but some drivers have an intense resentment of anyone getting in their way.  With the exception of the occasional testosterone-poisoned "ricer" Portlanders are amazingly patient and laid back in traffic.  They even stop for pedestrians and crossing cyclists. 

The weather in Portland isn't quite as hot as Tulsa's. Grin
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jacobi
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2011, 09:43:08 am »

@Cynical: I've been riding city street for awhile and only once has some redneck told me that I need tyo get off the road.  While, yeah, we got nothing on portland, we've done quite well in the lest 5 years or so. 

We came up as 35th on bicycling magazines list of bike friendly cities.  Check it out http://www.bicycling.com/news/featured-stories/bicyclings-top-50
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Conan71
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« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2011, 10:02:59 am »

Yeah, my "rival" Portland comment might be a bit exaggerated, but Tulsa has gone to great lengths to be cycling friendly.
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« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2011, 12:01:10 pm »

My posting was not intended to denigrate Tulsa's efforts to be bicycle friendly.  The bike route system and the trails put it ahead of most non-college cities its size that I've seen. I have ridden the streets and highways around here since the mid-1970s (I guess that makes me old), take my lane, and have had many people yell, a few people throw things, and most people drive around me without trouble.  The advent of the mobile phone/texting driver has changed the equation a bit.  Those folks are more dangerous than the drunks IMO. 

My impression is that the bike culture here is primarily recreational. In Portland as in NYC, bicycles are a transportation alternative. The proliferation of young, active, and underemployed adults probably stimulates bicycle use. The proliferation of microbreweries, etc., might not.

What could Tulsa do better for cyclists?

1. Bike parking downtown. The building I work in (the Bank of America Tower) has a parking garage, but bikes are banned. The BOK Tower, on the other hand, provides inside bike storage and a health club for showering. Give them a gold star, but even those upturned U-shaped things embeded in the sidewalk would help.
2. Trails along the remaining expressways, primarily the BA.
3. Bike lanes in low speed, high density areas such as downtown, Cherry Street, and Brookside.
4. More bicyclists (yes, even hipsters) to get drivers more accustomed to sharing the road.
5. Better weather - cooler in the summer, warmer in the winter. 

This isn't thread drift, is it?
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carltonplace
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« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2011, 01:37:24 pm »

Yes, lots more bikes; I think Tulsa Tough had more than a little influence on this.

I'm working on outfitting my bike to be my primary mode of transportation for errands, I already use it to go place to place or to meet friends out.
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Conan71
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« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2011, 01:39:17 pm »

My posting was not intended to denigrate Tulsa's efforts to be bicycle friendly.  The bike route system and the trails put it ahead of most non-college cities its size that I've seen. I have ridden the streets and highways around here since the mid-1970s (I guess that makes me old), take my lane, and have had many people yell, a few people throw things, and most people drive around me without trouble.  The advent of the mobile phone/texting driver has changed the equation a bit.  Those folks are more dangerous than the drunks IMO. 

My impression is that the bike culture here is primarily recreational. In Portland as in NYC, bicycles are a transportation alternative. The proliferation of young, active, and underemployed adults probably stimulates bicycle use. The proliferation of microbreweries, etc., might not.

What could Tulsa do better for cyclists?

1. Bike parking downtown. The building I work in (the Bank of America Tower) has a parking garage, but bikes are banned. The BOK Tower, on the other hand, provides inside bike storage and a health club for showering. Give them a gold star, but even those upturned U-shaped things embeded in the sidewalk would help.
2. Trails along the remaining expressways, primarily the BA.
3. Bike lanes in low speed, high density areas such as downtown, Cherry Street, and Brookside.
4. More bicyclists (yes, even hipsters) to get drivers more accustomed to sharing the road.
5. Better weather - cooler in the summer, warmer in the winter. 

This isn't thread drift, is it?


Nah, I wouldn't call it drift.  Now, if I were to compare McNellie's Pub Ale to Fat Tire...

You are correct, Tulsa's bike culture is primarily recreational.  I know a few people who try to ride everywhere possible but they are largely outnumbered by recreational riders.  I commuted to work and back a little this summer when I was training for the Leadville Trail 100 as I needed to get as much mileage as possible, but given the nature of my job, it can prove difficult when I need to go see clients during the day.  Fortunately we have a full apartment here at the office so a shower is no problem when I can commute.  We even have a jacuzzi tub Wink

When Lee's opened downtown, Adam had a vision of becoming somewhat of a Mellow Johnnie's in Austin by having day parking for bikes and a shower, but apparently the city frowned on the idea of a communal shower.  I'm really not sure how to finally tip things in favor of more commuters.

And speaking of commuters, does anyone remember that notoriously frugal Roger Randle was an avid bike commuter when he was mayor?  Good way to lead by example.

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Ed W
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« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2011, 02:23:14 pm »

I think if you were to examine the demographics in cites with a higher percentage of transportation bicyclists, you'd find that they're either college towns or cities with a much higher cost of living than Tulsa. I'm convinced that economics has more to do with getting people out of cars and onto bicycles than any amenities we can offer. The biggest competitor for those who would use a bike as transportation is mass transit. If buses, subways, or light rail exist that can serve population centers, the bicycle comes out second best.

Still, I think that commuting by bicycle here in Tulsa is certainly doable. Drivers are accommodating and safety minded - for the most part - and we're at more risk from inattentive motorists than any others. The deliberately hostile or 'homicidal maniac driving a car' are blessedly rare.

And I still think we should all get together for a ride some weekend.
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Ed

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Conan71
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« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2011, 02:58:54 pm »

I think if you were to examine the demographics in cites with a higher percentage of transportation bicyclists, you'd find that they're either college towns or cities with a much higher cost of living than Tulsa. I'm convinced that economics has more to do with getting people out of cars and onto bicycles than any amenities we can offer. The biggest competitor for those who would use a bike as transportation is mass transit. If buses, subways, or light rail exist that can serve population centers, the bicycle comes out second best.

Still, I think that commuting by bicycle here in Tulsa is certainly doable. Drivers are accommodating and safety minded - for the most part - and we're at more risk from inattentive motorists than any others. The deliberately hostile or 'homicidal maniac driving a car' are blessedly rare.

And I still think we should all get together for a ride some weekend.

Agreed.  There's a nice little ride coming up in three weeks from Tulsa to OKC Wink
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heironymouspasparagus
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« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2011, 04:12:47 pm »


Our trail system is pretty good, but there are significant gaps.  The only bike lane I've seen is on Archer and is mainly used to store broken glass.  The bike routes aren't bad, but some drivers have an intense resentment of anyone getting in their way.  With the exception of the occasional testosterone-poisoned "ricer" Portlanders are amazingly patient and laid back in traffic.  They even stop for pedestrians and crossing cyclists.  

The weather in Portland isn't quite as hot as Tulsa's. Grin

Went to Portland a year and half ago and was amazed with the bike system.  Tulsa will likely never go to that extent, but what we have is exceptional among most cities.  It amazes me how well developed it is becoming.  I never expected such a progressive stance when I was cycling full time in the past (60's, 70's, thru early 80's.)  It is a joy to behold and I am getting back to riding.

Getting to work would be rough for me, due to the far flung nature of my work day, but I can remember in 1978-79-80 riding from BA into mid town Tulsa (15th & Yale) to go to work.  Long ride, but it was viable due to lower traffic on 145th.  Now - suicide!

As comparison, OKC area has nothing.  Few miles over by Hefner lake.  Can't get to Norman or even Moore on trails.  Unless you know of some secret route, Conan??





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« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2011, 05:24:42 pm »

Agreed.  There's a nice little ride coming up in three weeks from Tulsa to OKC Wink

I just gave up walking with the cane, Conan!  I'm in no condition to ride the MS150.
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Ed

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jacobi
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« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2011, 05:27:18 pm »

What I'll say is that most of the time I find myself bemoaning my inablity to do anything to realize what it is that I want to see her.  I can't build buildings, or start a business.  The most important thing I can do it ride my bike when and where I can.  It's seemingly all I can do.

So I'll do it.

Also, Ed is right.  There should be a TNF Ride.  Does a sunday sound good to people?  If we can agree on a date, we can post it in the happenings forum?
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