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December 18, 2018, 11:16:54 pm
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Author Topic: Transit / BRT  (Read 367 times)
Red Arrow
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« on: October 18, 2018, 07:35:38 pm »

Moving away from the Ikea thread:

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Bus Rapid Transit, if done right with set schedules, covered stops and high frequency, can be more effective than a streetcar.  Especially for a long distance inter-city route like Peoria.  That being said I think we should look at what OKC (and Kansas City) have done with a streetcar and see if we can do something similar that connects the downtown districts and also to TU.  I'm in OKC every few months and have been impressed by the new developments that have been spurred along the line. 

BRT done right is intended to compete with Light Rail or even Heavy Rail, not streetcars.  Tulsa is not getting true BRT but it will be a step up from what we currently have. Transit Oriented Development is generally more robust along rail lines compared to rubber tire vehicle routes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus_rapid_transit#Failures_and_reversals
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Bus rapid transit (BRT), also called a busway or transitway, is a bus-based public transport system designed to improve capacity and reliability relative to a conventional bus system.[2] Typically, a BRT system includes roadways that are dedicated to buses, and gives priority to buses at intersections where buses may interact with other traffic; alongside design features to reduce delays caused by passengers boarding or leaving buses, or purchasing fares. BRT aims to combine the capacity and speed of a metro with the flexibility, lower cost and simplicity of a bus system.

I have posted this link before.  It is obviously rail oriented but I believe they generally treat BRT fairly.  There's a lot of info for a day of surfing.
https://www.lightrailnow.org


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BRT_Standard
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Basic characteristics
TransJakarta bus on the dedicated bus lane, an exclusive right-of-way separated from heavy traffic
There are five essential characteristics of a BRT corridor.[8]

Dedicated right-of-way — An exclusive right-of-way is vital to ensuring that buses can move quickly and unimpeded by congestion. Enforcement of the dedicated lane can be handled in different ways, such as delineators, bollards, or colorized pavement.
Busway alignment — Alignment of traffic lane so that conflicts with other traffic can be minimized. Options include exclusive bus only corridor, median (central reservation) aligned and curb aligned (but curb aligned only where there are infrequent intersections to cause traffic conflicts and delays)
Off-board fare collection — Collecting fares before boarding, either through a “barrier controlled” or “proof-of-payment” method, is one of the most important factors in reducing station dwell time and therefore total travel time, thus improving the customer experience.
Intersection treatments — There are several ways to increase bus speeds at intersections, all of which are aimed at increasing the green signal time for the bus lane. Forbidding turns across the bus lane and minimizing the number of traffic-signal phases where possible are the most important. Traffic-signal priority when activated by an approaching BRT vehicle is useful in lower-frequency corridors.
Platform-level boarding — Having the bus-station platform level with the bus floor is one of the most important ways of reducing boarding and alighting times per passenger. The reduction or elimination of the vehicle-to-platform gap is also key to customer safety and comfort. A range of measures can be used to achieve platform gaps of less than 5 cm (2.0 in), including guided busways at stations, alignment markers, Kassel curbs, and boarding bridges.

Best practices
In addition to BRT basics, the Standard identifies several categories of BRT elements and characteristics which contribute to superior BRT corridors:[7]

Service Planning — multiple routes, peak frequency buses, and hours of operation
Infrastructure — passing lanes at stations, minimizing vehicle exhaust emissions, and improved pavement quality
Station Design and Station-Bus Interface — safe and comfortable stations, number of doors on bus, and reasonable distances between stations
Quality of Service and Passenger Information Systems — branding and passenger information
Integration and Access — integration with other transportation, secure bicycle parking, and universal access
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SXSW
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« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2018, 08:17:30 pm »

I believe they are planning on starting service on the Aero BRT in fall 2019.  Does anyone know what the stations will look like?  I assume covered with seating but hopefully they have some kind of unique characteristic to the Peoria corridor.

Aero map
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MostSeriousness
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« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2018, 11:10:48 am »

Not sure if there's been change from...over a year ago looks like. But found some drafts of vehicle and stop design posted on the City Council Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/tulsacitycouncil/photos/pcb.10154520651896721/10154520646691721/?type=1&theater
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SXSW
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« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2018, 11:23:59 am »

Not sure if there's been change from...over a year ago looks like. But found some drafts of vehicle and stop design posted on the City Council Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/tulsacitycouncil/photos/pcb.10154520651896721/10154520646691721/?type=1&theater


Cool yeah that's what I was looking for.  The map below shows which stops will be local, improved and enhanced:
http://iqc.ou.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/tuslabrt.jpg

« Last Edit: October 19, 2018, 11:25:34 am by SXSW » Logged

 
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