A grassroots organization focused on the intelligent and sustainable development, preservation and revitalization of Tulsa.
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
June 27, 2019, 06:07:57 am
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Can We Expand Downtown Development Opportunities ?  (Read 1389 times)
Rico
Guest
« on: September 15, 2009, 07:05:30 pm »

Well.... It's been quite some time since I started a thread.

This is an idea that I have had for a while. Unfortunately some ideas never reach the light of day because you just don't have the time to play them out.

To begin, I hope the "PlanitTulsa" endeavor has much success, that being said, I am somewhat optimistic that it may have a visible impact during my lifetime.

 That is, I think that the wheels of the great "Bureaucracy", that is City Government coupled with Neanderthal development methods  may impede any positive effects.

I have always believed the success of the envied cities such as Portland, and others, came from the city taking "Neighborhood/Area Plans" created by the residents of the same and simply adding muscle and a few tricks to expedite the same..
This may well be what some believe will be the outcome of "PlanitTulsa".
I hope to Haitees it is. But what if it isn't.

OK all of the above rhetoric being said "How about this while we wait.....?"

Many many acres of the Central Business District zoned land has been used for non CBD purposes. (ie David L Moss Correction Center, Salvation Army, Day Center for the Homeless, Avalon Pre-Release Center, the list is much longer than just these, but you get the picture.

What if we were to take an inventory of the amount of property, that lies within the CBD, that is not being used for CBD zoned uses. Compensate for that number of acres by....... attaching CBD zoning to promising real estate in the areas adjoining the Central Business District.

Thus giving that real estate the most flexible possible zoning , that now exists, to help spur development.
It would also greatly increase the area available to generate sales tax revenue. Politicians should love that.

This all could be done in a very short time frame. The results could be far more immediate than trying to rewrite the entire zoning code.

Well like I say..... It has been quite a while since I started a thread.


Logged
FOTD
Guest
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2009, 09:04:37 pm »

What land uses are you contemplating spread over into these new CBD zoned areas?
Logged
cannon_fodder
All around good guy.
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 9379



« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2009, 08:50:06 am »

Rico -

I like the idea, but it will never fly.  The reason it is doomed to die and that developers will probably be less excited by it than you is that there is a glut of land still available in the CBD.  Parking lots, abandoned buildings, and event vacant lots still litter the CBD.  Until that land fills up, calls for expanding the zoning will go unheeded UNLESS a big developer demands it.

However, that doesn't mean we can't make zoning in other areas more appropriate.  Kill the big-box style parking lot requirements.  Allow joint use structures in most if not all commercial areas (why can't we have apartments above retail on Cherry Street or Brookside?).  Discourage people from tearing down old buildings (even just a waiting period on demolition permits of 1 week with internet posting of demo permits).  Mandate the TDA use its authority to develop Tulsa . . . not just sit on land for years (or more).  Stop letting the fire department set zoning and use standards - when things are mandated "for safety" look into the claim (ie. sprinkler systems!). 

Hell, do small things. Encourage Tulsans to help make their town nicer by enforcing litter ordinances, making work crews actually clean up an area (change community service to job based:  2 hours = clean 1 mile stretch of road to spec.  4 hours = clean one block of downtown, 8 hours = paint one hall way in the Courthouse . . .whatever.  Not just "you must slack off for 8 hours.").  Bah!  There are plenty of changes to be made.  At least you are THINKING about ways to make Tulsa better.

Logged

- - - - - - - - -
I crush grooves.
Rico
Guest
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2009, 06:53:52 pm »

Originally posted by cannon_fodder.
"I like the idea, but it will never fly.  The reason it is doomed to die and that developers will probably be less excited by it than you is that there is a glut of land still available in the CBD.  Parking lots, abandoned buildings, and event vacant lots still litter the CBD.  Until that land fills up, calls for expanding the zoning will go unheeded UNLESS a big developer demands it."

Actually this idea was not mine. It came from Mr Alberty himself as a suggestion to deal with construction issues in Brookside.
I merely changed the area that it could apply to and be of benefit to. When Jim Norton was still head of DTU he had stated publicly that the Downtown Core was running out of land to be utilized.
The areas around Brady, Blue Dome, Eastend, etc. are ripe for projects at this very moment... They are limited by the zoning in place.
The parking lot wasteland to the south of 6th street will likely remain just that for some time.

People that I speak with are eager to cash in on the various developments and trends associated with the area referenced above.
As it stands, to build in most, would require much red tape to be consumed and the results of that would be uncertain.

The City of Tulsa has lost many acres of valuable CBD zoned properties due to past mistakes. They need to get ahead of the curve on this one.
Make the property that is in the right location easier to develop.
Not think they can force development to happen at their convenience.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
  Hosted by TulsaConnect and Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
 

Mission

 

"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
more...

 

Contact

 

2210 S Main St.
Tulsa, OK 74114
(918) 409-2669
info@tulsanow.org