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Author Topic: Pearl District Pork  (Read 9045 times)
Double A
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« on: February 02, 2009, 11:19:25 pm »

PUBLIC HEARING

Please find attached a Notice from Public Works Engineers regarding a Tuesday Public Hearing of the latest designs for the Pearl District's 6th St. Canal and stormwater system.  

This project is critical to public safety and to the social and economic revitalization of the Pearl District, just east of Downtown Tulsa.  

It is probably among most creative and progressive stormwater solutions in the nation, and among the most innovative yet designed by the City of Tulsa's Public Works team - recognized nationally for their stormwater management systems.

We believe it is also critical to re-defining Tulsa as a livable, sustainable city (financially and environmentally) in the 21st. Century.  

The Pearl District Association is leading the way in:

(1) Progressive land use policy (piloting 'form-based' land use codes),
(2) Progressive approaches to pedestrian-focused street design ('Living Streets'),
(3) Residential re-development (new urbanism),
(4) Food security: bringing locally-grown produce to the inner-city (Pearl Farmers Market)

Now we aim to show how great, urban Design can deliver a real return on public investment.  Public Works, its consultant engineers and the Pearl District Association are planning a distinctive, livable, cost-efficient, urban neighborhood through innovative approaches to essential infrastructure improvements.

The Board of the Pearl District Association invites you join us, the design team, and neighbors, Tuesday.

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sgrizzle
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2009, 08:04:57 am »

When I hear "Pork" I think primarily of bacon, but I don't see that hear. The second possibility is that there is a large sum of money dedicated to a politician's pet project. I see neither money nor any politician who really cares about this.

What gives?
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2009, 08:11:21 am »

I bet if they were spending money to wipe out Bumgarner's blight on the north Cherry St. area, it wouldn't have said "pork" in the title.

Maybe AA has heard a swine farm is moving to 6th & Peoria.
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2009, 08:18:17 am »

quote:
Sorry, unable to retrieve document for viewing.


I've heard this project described, but never have seen the plans.
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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2009, 08:50:39 am »

I have seen the old Pearl District plans. Would really like to see the new refined version. What time is the meeting and where?

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« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2009, 09:04:17 am »

I think it was a biblical reference...

Matthew 7.6

"Do not give what is holy to dogs; and do not throw your pearls before swine."
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« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2009, 11:45:31 am »

Ever wondered why the 6th street commercial corridor is sitting there dormant?  Ever wished for a revitalized connection between TU and downtown?  Ever envisioned 6th street as the next fun, funky neighborhood (now that Brookside has been gentrified).

The thing that is holding all of the dreams back is that the area around 6th and Peoria is in a FLOOD PLAIN.  They can't build anything new there until the flood problems get fixed.

This is the proposal from the public works department about how they intend to pursue the next phase of flood remediation in this area.  It will benefit the Pearl District, Elm Creek, Gunboat, a bit of Kendall Whittier, and eventually, believe it or not, Riverview neighborhood downstream.  Solving the flood problems will open up this prime real estate for new development, as well as revitalization of existing historic buildings.  It's the perfect location for infill, with a neighborhood that is supportive of great urban design.

If, by "pork," you mean that they hope to make the project beautiful as well as functional... I say "Bring on the bacon!"

Meeting: 6:30 PM
Location: Central Center at Centennial Park
1028 E. 6th ("The Boathouse")

See conceptual drawings, talk to hydrologists, city planners, landscape designers, etc.  Ask questions, comment, or just learn more about the project.

« Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 12:01:01 pm by PonderInc » Logged
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« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2009, 11:59:44 am »

Here's the letter that Public Works sent out to property owners in the area...

You are invited to a public meeting for review and comment concerning the Elm Creek Master Drainage Plan. The meeting will be held Tuesday, Feb. 3, at 6:30 p.m. in the Central Center at Centennial Park, 1028 East Sixth St. (southwest corner of Sixth Street and Peoria Avenue).

The City of Tulsa has held several public meetings to keep citizens informed and to receive comments regarding the development of plans for the Elm Creek basin. We have developed exciting conceptual designs for facilities in the City’s Elm Creek Master Drainage Plan and invite you to review and comment on them.

Working closely with the Pearl District and Kendall-Whittier neighborhood associations, the
City of Tulsa has prepared designs for proposed multi-purpose stormwater detention ponds,
storm sewer improvements, and Sixth Street storm drainage conveyance (see attached map).

The proposed plans and designs are quite creative, and will have a major impact on the Elm Creek/Pearl District/Kendall Whittier neighborhoods’ redevelopment potential. We invite your review and comments prior to moving on to the final design of the project.  

Our records indicate that your property is in or near the proposed facilities and may be affected by this updated master drainage plan. A summary plan map is on the reverse side of this notice.

We also will have information fact sheets and maps for you at the meeting.

Representatives from the City and from the consultant team will be available at the meeting to answer your questions. If you are unable to attend the public meeting and have questions or concerns, you may contact the City project manager:

Carl Craigo, P.E., Project Manager
City of Tulsa, Department of Public Works
2317 S. Jackson Ave.
Tulsa, OK 74107
(918) 596-1549


Here's the map...
« Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 12:15:47 pm by PonderInc » Logged
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« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2009, 12:34:38 pm »

OMG the Pearl District is being invaded by Tetris!

Seriously though, why are all the new ponds only right angles?
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« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2009, 01:22:12 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by sgrizzle

OMG the Pearl District is being invaded by Tetris!

Seriously though, why are all the new ponds only right angles?



Two possibilities come to mind:
1) The new ponds will be more utilitarian than aesthetic.
2) Those blocks are placeholders covering tracts that will be condemned and taken for the drainage project; specific designs are forthcoming.

I'm wondering what the cost difference is.  I'm also wondering just how "shovel-ready" these projects are.
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« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2009, 03:51:17 pm »

Actually, I think the detention ponds being more angular is to help make them more urban and unique. I think the intention is to also have it so that, and dont quote me on this, buildings can be built up next to them. More like something you would see in the central part of a European city. They are part of the neighborhood, the streets, interwoven into the the pedestrian fabric of the area. Not off in the middle of some park, but right there. Remember whats unique and experimental in Tulsa or the US, is often tried and true in other parts of the world [Wink]. The first retention pond was great and definitely an improvement to the usual hole in the ground. If these are going to be the way I think they might, its just a completely different approach from what we usually see. And could be quite remarkable. Will have to go and check it out tonight.


« Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 03:53:45 pm by TheArtist » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2009, 08:36:54 pm »

They managed to get the Laura Dester Shelter out of there as soon as the new one is built. Typical Tulsa cleansing[B)]
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« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2009, 10:14:01 pm »

Went to the meeting. Was interesting to see how the plans and ideas had progressed from the previous sketches and possibilities we have seen before.

The meeting started out with the hydrological and engineering situation of the area. This is apparently one of the last major areas of the city to have its flooding problems addressed. They stated how the old system in place since the 1920s was out of date and couldn't handle what the minimum the city has to consider, which is the 100 year flood scenario. One of which happened in that area in the 80s (some areas still have minor flooding problems on a regular basis). The plan that was subsequently put forth in the 80s would have required taking out a huge amount of the homes and businesses in the area and cost more than this new plan.

The speaker mentioned that there are basically 3 tools which can be used to help control flooding. Retention ponds which hold excess water during flooding events and meter out the water into the downstream system so as not to overwhelm that downstream system. Canals, culverts, underground culverts, etc. which rapidly transport the water from one place to another and vary in size depending on the amount of water carrying capacity you want. And removal of buildings/residences from the flood plain.

After a lot of going back and forth, for this particular area they came up with a scenario that includes elements of all 3. During this process they worked with the neighborhood groups, property owners and residents to come up with a plan to try and take into consideration their concerns and wishes. They wanted something that would do many things, yes be a flood control project, that had to be done, but done in a way that both didn't hurt the area, taking out too many homes and businesses, but also acted to actually improve the area. This is one of the areas of the city that has seen a long and steady decline. The thought was to come up with a way to take an important flood control project that had to be done, and creatively use it to have the ancillary benefit of helping revitalize that part of the city. A part of the city that feeds into downtown "essentially a downtown neighborhood and part of that revitalization effort" and connects other parts like TU and the Utica corridor. Another part of this project isn't just utilitarian as a flood control, or even to lay the foundation for future growth in the area, but its nature is such that it seeks to improve the quality of the area and any future development. Making the area have higher quality, beautiful pedestrian friendly streets, higher quality neighborhoods for Tulsa, a beautiful environment to live in, work in, shop, etc. It seeks to enhance Tulsa's quality of life and attractiveness. A foundation that would take the nature of the city up a level from what would otherwise occur in the area.

Here are some birds eye renderings. I will try and get some of the street level renderings and elevations later, for that is where you can really get a feel for what this may be like.

 





Couple of notes...

The areas in the map first shown in this thread where the vol aquisition/buyout buildings are, represent where homes will be bought out on a voluntary basis over time so that those areas will no longer have homes in the flood zones. They mentioned that it would likely have been more disruptive, difficult and expensive to have added more water retention ponds and culverts for those areas, so the Voluntary Buyout was the option for those sections.

The "building squares" around the retention ponds/public spaces are mostly suggestive only. If there is say a building where one of those is, that doesn't necessarily mean it will have to be removed. Those "building squares" are general, suggestive possibilities. They may like to perhaps gather up some segments of property for development. But otherwise, if you have a property in those spots, there may, only in some instances, be voluntary buyouts. The areas IN the actual water retention segments would of course be require buyouts which would have to happen with any configuration.  

These plans are said to not be the final, exact plans. But appear to be getting close to what it may look like. When and if funding ever happens lol. There are several steps and more meetings before anything can be approved.

« Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 10:34:15 pm by TheArtist » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2009, 12:09:51 pm »

Great summary, Artist!  Thanks for the pics and the explanation of historic problems and future plans.

If you can post some street-level elevations of the proposal, that would be great.

I'm personally always very happy and proud when I drive by the new "lake" at Central Park.  Happy that Tulsa created something beautiful to solve a flooding problem.  Happy that we considered aesthetics and people, instead of just the cheapest possible technical solution.  We need more thinking like this.  Especially near downtown, which should be the showcase of the metro region...and reflect the heart and soul of Tulsa.

Tulsa is not some two-bit town, and we need to stop thinking like one.  Anybody with a backhoe can dig a ditch for flood retention.  It takes real vision and courage to create something useful and beautiful that will serve the community for generations to come.  Can't wait to see this plan come to fruition!
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« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2009, 03:30:53 pm »

It was a treat to be able to sit next to you, Artist. [Wink]

The plans look very good overall, and I'm excited about the canal. I'm also thrilled with the possibility of including teaching gardens, community gardens and wetlands.

This looks to be a very promising start of a fantastic redevelopment of an area that needs some more TLC.

I'd also like to point out that all of this was somewhere between $58 and $60 million, the same cost of the new baseball stadium and adjoining development, but will likely lead to a greater return on investment. Imagine a truly urban neighborhood, shops, cafes, bookstores, parks, apartments, rowhouses... all within walking distance.
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