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August 15, 2018, 03:34:08 am
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Author Topic: "Wasilla hillbillies looting Neiman Marcus from co  (Read 1741 times)
joiei
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« on: November 05, 2008, 01:47:57 pm »

from Newsweek's web site (I wonder how much of those clothes she will really give back before she starts her new job as talking head at Fox News.)

NEWSWEEK has also learned that Palin's shopping spree at high-end department stores was more extensive than previously reported. While publicly supporting Palin, McCain's top advisers privately fumed at what they regarded as her outrageous profligacy. One senior aide said that Nicolle Wallace had told Palin to buy three suits for the convention and hire a stylist. But instead, the vice presidential nominee began buying for herself and her family—clothes and accessories from top stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus. According to two knowledgeable sources, a vast majority of the clothes were bought by a wealthy donor, who was shocked when he got the bill. Palin also used low-level staffers to buy some of the clothes on their credit cards. The McCain campaign found out last week when the aides sought reimbursement. One aide estimated that she spent "tens of thousands" more than the reported $150,000, and that $20,000 to $40,000 went to buy clothes for her husband. Some articles of clothing have apparently been lost. An angry aide characterized the shopping spree as "Wasilla hillbillies looting Neiman Marcus from coast to coast," and said the truth will eventually come out when the Republican Party audits its books.

A Palin aide said: "Governor Palin was not directing staffers to put anything on their personal credit cards, and anything that staffers put on their credit cards has been reimbursed, like an expense. Nasty and false accusations following a defeat say more about the person who made them than they do about Governor Palin."

  McCain himself rarely spoke to Palin during the campaign, and aides kept him in the dark about the details of her spending on clothes because they were sure he would be offended. Palin asked to speak along with McCain at his Arizona concession speech Tuesday night, but campaign strategist Steve Schmidt vetoed the request.

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Conan71
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« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2008, 02:16:23 pm »

Joiei, the election's over.

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"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
waterboy
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« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2008, 02:44:59 pm »

I see a cutting edge comedy show here. "The Wasilla Hillbillies"!!! Sarah as Jeb, McCain as the banker, Todd Palin as Jethro. But who's Granny? Are Flatt & Scruggs still available?
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Conan71
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« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2008, 05:04:12 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by waterboy

I see a cutting edge comedy show here. "The Wasilla Hillbillies"!!! Sarah as Jeb, McCain as the banker, Todd Palin as Jethro. But who's Granny? Are Flatt & Scruggs still available?



I think Flatt's been taking the eternal dirt nap for the last 25 years or so.  Scruggs is still around.  

You just know some sort of reality series is in the making now that Wasilla is world-renowned.
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"It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first” -Ronald Reagan
RecycleMichael
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« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2008, 06:22:48 pm »

"The Beverly Hillbillies" story was based on the real life oil discovery in this area.

From the Tulsa World's "Way Back When" series,  by Gene Curtis...

"A pioneer Oklahoman was on a hunting trip with two friends in 1905 when his two Kentucky wolfhounds chased after a wolf and disappeared, leading to the accidental discovery of oil on farmland owned by a Creek Indian named Ida Glenn.

Charles F. Colcord, who died in 1934 at the age of 75, frequently told about that hunting trip and the later search by Frank Chesley and Robert T. Galbreath for the dogs.

While searching for the dogs, which he found, Chesley discovered a spot where oil was seeping from some rocks. The accidental discovery was in much the same manner as television's Clampett family did some 50 years later in the television sitcom, "Beverly Hillbillies."

In the original episode, his friend, the president of OK Oil, convinces Jed to move the family. The oilman says that he has his money in the bank in Tulsa.
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TulsaFan-inTexas
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« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2008, 07:04:39 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by RecycleMichael

"The Beverly Hillbillies" story was based on the real life oil discovery in this area.

From the Tulsa World's "Way Back When" series,  by Gene Curtis...

"A pioneer Oklahoman was on a hunting trip with two friends in 1905 when his two Kentucky wolfhounds chased after a wolf and disappeared, leading to the accidental discovery of oil on farmland owned by a Creek Indian named Ida Glenn.

Charles F. Colcord, who died in 1934 at the age of 75, frequently told about that hunting trip and the later search by Frank Chesley and Robert T. Galbreath for the dogs.

While searching for the dogs, which he found, Chesley discovered a spot where oil was seeping from some rocks. The accidental discovery was in much the same manner as television's Clampett family did some 50 years later in the television sitcom, "Beverly Hillbillies."

In the original episode, his friend, the president of OK Oil, convinces Jed to move the family. The oilman says that he has his money in the bank in Tulsa.



Interesting! Thanks RM!
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joiei
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« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2008, 10:49:00 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by waterboy

I see a cutting edge comedy show here. "The Wasilla Hillbillies"!!! Sarah as Jeb, McCain as the banker, Todd Palin as Jethro. But who's Granny? Are Flatt & Scruggs still available?

Who's Granny, how about Ann Coulter?
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sgrizzle
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Inconceivable!


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« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2008, 08:33:11 am »

quote:
Originally posted by TulsaFan-inTexas

quote:
Originally posted by RecycleMichael

"The Beverly Hillbillies" story was based on the real life oil discovery in this area.

From the Tulsa World's "Way Back When" series,  by Gene Curtis...

"A pioneer Oklahoman was on a hunting trip with two friends in 1905 when his two Kentucky wolfhounds chased after a wolf and disappeared, leading to the accidental discovery of oil on farmland owned by a Creek Indian named Ida Glenn.

Charles F. Colcord, who died in 1934 at the age of 75, frequently told about that hunting trip and the later search by Frank Chesley and Robert T. Galbreath for the dogs.

While searching for the dogs, which he found, Chesley discovered a spot where oil was seeping from some rocks. The accidental discovery was in much the same manner as television's Clampett family did some 50 years later in the television sitcom, "Beverly Hillbillies."

In the original episode, his friend, the president of OK Oil, convinces Jed to move the family. The oilman says that he has his money in the bank in Tulsa.



Interesting! Thanks RM!



Here is the pilot:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtDXEj2JO3U
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waterboy
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« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2008, 09:18:31 am »

quote:
Originally posted by sgrizzle

quote:
Originally posted by TulsaFan-inTexas

quote:
Originally posted by RecycleMichael

"The Beverly Hillbillies" story was based on the real life oil discovery in this area.

From the Tulsa World's "Way Back When" series,  by Gene Curtis...

"A pioneer Oklahoman was on a hunting trip with two friends in 1905 when his two Kentucky wolfhounds chased after a wolf and disappeared, leading to the accidental discovery of oil on farmland owned by a Creek Indian named Ida Glenn.

Charles F. Colcord, who died in 1934 at the age of 75, frequently told about that hunting trip and the later search by Frank Chesley and Robert T. Galbreath for the dogs.

While searching for the dogs, which he found, Chesley discovered a spot where oil was seeping from some rocks. The accidental discovery was in much the same manner as television's Clampett family did some 50 years later in the television sitcom, "Beverly Hillbillies."

In the original episode, his friend, the president of OK Oil, convinces Jed to move the family. The oilman says that he has his money in the bank in Tulsa.



Interesting! Thanks RM!



Here is the pilot:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtDXEj2JO3U



[Cheesy]"Ellie May carries herself proud"-Jeb

Coulter could also be the banker's secretary.
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joiei
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« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2008, 01:34:29 pm »

quote:
Originally posted by RecycleMichael

"The Beverly Hillbillies" story was based on the real life oil discovery in this area.

From the Tulsa World's "Way Back When" series,  by Gene Curtis...

"A pioneer Oklahoman was on a hunting trip with two friends in 1905 when his two Kentucky wolfhounds chased after a wolf and disappeared, leading to the accidental discovery of oil on farmland owned by a Creek Indian named Ida Glenn.

Charles F. Colcord, who died in 1934 at the age of 75, frequently told about that hunting trip and the later search by Frank Chesley and Robert T. Galbreath for the dogs.

While searching for the dogs, which he found, Chesley discovered a spot where oil was seeping from some rocks. The accidental discovery was in much the same manner as television's Clampett family did some 50 years later in the television sitcom, "Beverly Hillbillies."

In the original episode, his friend, the president of OK Oil, convinces Jed to move the family. The oilman says that he has his money in the bank in Tulsa.

Oh my gosh, that was just on tv today, it was soooooo funny.  What with granny cooking up the golf eggs and Ellie Mae being a better pitcher than Jethro and the revenuer (tax man) and Leo DeRocher.  And the Pee-troll-e-um man from Tulsa.  I might have to spring for the series, at least the early shows on DVD.
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‎"The only time to eat diet food is while you're waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child.
Chicken Little
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« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2008, 10:28:54 am »

quote:
Originally posted by RecycleMichael

"The Beverly Hillbillies" story was based on the real life oil discovery in this area.

From the Tulsa World's "Way Back When" series,  by Gene Curtis...

"A pioneer Oklahoman was on a hunting trip with two friends in 1905 when his two Kentucky wolfhounds chased after a wolf and disappeared, leading to the accidental discovery of oil on farmland owned by a Creek Indian named Ida Glenn.

Charles F. Colcord, who died in 1934 at the age of 75, frequently told about that hunting trip and the later search by Frank Chesley and Robert T. Galbreath for the dogs.

While searching for the dogs, which he found, Chesley discovered a spot where oil was seeping from some rocks. The accidental discovery was in much the same manner as television's Clampett family did some 50 years later in the television sitcom, "Beverly Hillbillies."

In the original episode, his friend, the president of OK Oil, convinces Jed to move the family. The oilman says that he has his money in the bank in Tulsa.

Yes, if I recall correctly, Jeb was shootin' at some food...

And up from the ground came 'a bubblin' crude.

Ha!  Try to get that out of your head.[Wink]
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