A grassroots organization focused on the intelligent and sustainable development, preservation and revitalization of Tulsa.
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 22, 2019, 08:21:08 pm
Pages: 1 ... 30 31 [32]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Better Streetlights for Tulsa  (Read 188173 times)
Hoss
I'm a Daft Punk
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 11238


I might be moving to Montana soon...


WWW
« Reply #465 on: November 10, 2018, 02:25:10 pm »

People are surprised to find out that HP Sodium actually has blues and greens in its spectra (whereas amber LEDs dont), but lighting salesmen portrayed that as ugly compared to their new "white" lights (because the bluish-gray pallor in the sky from "white" lights isnt ugly?)



New street lights illuminating Blue Dome District
https://www.tulsaworld.com/business/smallbusiness/new-street-lights-illuminating-blue-dome-district/article_a467f80d-1c5e-5d58-a506-aee7e772f7fa.html

The city of Tulsa contracted Crossland Heavy Contractors to do the work, which replaced the acorn-style street lamps. The job was funded through the Blue Dome Tax Increment Financing District, which was created in 2003 to stimulate development in a nine-block area.


FWIW I like these flat-lens Domus fixtures MUCH better than the acorns, but I like the warm-white 3000K version even more.







I've switched all the light bulbs in my house to the 2700K leds.  That's close to warm-white right?  It seems that way.  I initially was buying ones that seemed way too blue.
Logged

Libertarianism is a system of beliefs for people who think adolescence is the epitome of human achievement.

Global warming isn't real because it was cold today.  Also great news: world famine is over because I just ate - Stephen Colbert.

Somebody find Guido an ambulance to chase...
patric
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 7439


These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #466 on: November 10, 2018, 05:35:57 pm »

I've switched all the light bulbs in my house to the 2700K leds.  That's close to warm-white right?  It seems that way.  I initially was buying ones that seemed way too blue.

You are spot on.  
The biggest mistake most people make picking LEDs is not realizing that "daylight" bulbs are a lot bluer than the incandescent bulbs they are replacing.  They might be suited for a kitchen or garage but not living spaces.  

Outdoors, blue-rich lights are horrendous.  A warm white light at night might be neighbor-friendly while a daylight bulb of the same intensity might be totally unacceptable, due to the dark-adapted eyes' greater sensitivity to blue (Scotopic vision).

Im noticing what might be a trend among realtors to use daylight bulbs everywhere to give a home a "sparkle" when showing the property in the daytime, but that effect becomes ghoulish when the sun goes down.

Aesthetics aside, light color affects us biologically (as it does all living things). You dont want your lighting to continually push your Circadian Rhythm button telling you its wake-up time when its close to bedtime.  Daylight is for daytime.

« Last Edit: November 10, 2018, 05:40:45 pm by patric » Logged

"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
swake
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 7795



« Reply #467 on: November 10, 2018, 07:29:12 pm »

You are spot on.  
The biggest mistake most people make picking LEDs is not realizing that "daylight" bulbs are a lot bluer than the incandescent bulbs they are replacing.  They might be suited for a kitchen or garage but not living spaces.  

Outdoors, blue-rich lights are horrendous.  A warm white light at night might be neighbor-friendly while a daylight bulb of the same intensity might be totally unacceptable, due to the dark-adapted eyes' greater sensitivity to blue (Scotopic vision).

Im noticing what might be a trend among realtors to use daylight bulbs everywhere to give a home a "sparkle" when showing the property in the daytime, but that effect becomes ghoulish when the sun goes down.

Aesthetics aside, light color affects us biologically (as it does all living things). You dont want your lighting to continually push your Circadian Rhythm button telling you its wake-up time when its close to bedtime.  Daylight is for daytime.



I have some tunable smart bulbs in lamps. With an app they can be changed anywhere between 2700 to 6500.

I also have RGB bulbs in all my outdoor fixtures and in my path lights and lights in my flower beds so I have instant holiday lighting anytime I want.
Logged
Cetary
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 83


« Reply #468 on: November 11, 2018, 07:48:59 am »

To add on to Patric's recommendation for various color temperature use cases indoors, I would recommend a CCT no higher then 3500K anywhere. 3500K is a relatively pleasing neutral white in contrast to 2700K. It is nowhere nearly as truly ugly and jarring as 2700K and 5000K+ combination setups. The California Lighting Technical Center at UC Davis advises no more then 3500K anywhere in residential projects. On a side note, that group advised Davis in its pioneering usage of the warm 2700K street lighting in the GreenCobra Jr. But on the subject, I purchased 3500K A19 bulbs for my friend's bathroom that originally was using 5000K everywhere, and she loves the 3500K. People don't realize that there's a wide range of CCT's between 2700K and 5000K that is underutilized. I support Patric's original statement on the blue-rich LEDs, they don't belong anyplace people are at night.  

Also wanted to elaborate on Patric's statement on the 5000K LED lamp. The 5000K LED is *marketed* as daylight, but the actual typical SPD of 5000K LED looks almost nothing like actual sunlight. The CRI values aren't any higher then the typical 80 CRI, and they don't even touch on the R9 and R12 values of a black body radiator. The R9 value determines how well a white light source reproduces saturated reds. Residential grade LED lighting typically has single digit to the teens R9 values, and blue-rich high CCT LEDs have shown R9 values so poor they actually register in the negative range. That means things like skin tones look really pale and washed out. That's leaving out how ghoulish 5000K is by itself at night. Sunlight, by the way, has perfect R9 and R12 and a perfect 100 CRI as does the warm white 2700K incandescent. I just had a another friend that thought his 5000K LED's were somehow objectively better white light then 2700K incandescent by looking more subjectively 'white.' I had to correct him on that.

It also looks like hotels now are using 5000K too now. The last hotel I stayed at in Seattle had 5000K everywhere...even the clockface was 5000K. I brought my own custom built 2700K 90 CRI/50 R9 flashlights to light the room after dark. Keep in mind flashlights have gotten way more powerful since lithiuim batteries and LED, so there's usable output for long runtimes now. Walking down the hallways and seeing rooms with open doors lit in 5000K was a very shocking experience. Their lights were literally just blue, like *so* blue. I really emphasize this, there is so much blue content in a 5000K LED. And this hotel was exposing all its guests to this.


On another note, it looks like we may be looking at the future of street lighting in Austria.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9tMAvjc3VA

Warm white along the mains and amber residential and low traffic areas.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2018, 08:14:42 am by Cetary » Logged
patric
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 7439


These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #469 on: November 19, 2018, 10:11:03 am »

Just when you think Tulsa leaders get it...

It looks like the glare-prone Acorn lights removed from the Blue Dome district may be another hand-me-down for the Kendall-Whittier district.  There' probably so glad to get anything called a "streetlight" that they dont care what a poor job they do actually lighting the street.

The city should NOT be installing more Acorn glare bombs, new or used.
If you want to re-purpose them, acknowledge that decorative lights should have a decorative intensity and dont try to use them as the sole source of street illumination. 1,000 Lumens tops.


The Kendall-Whittier area's portion of Route 66 may get a little brighter soon. The Tulsa Route 66 Commission Chair Ed Sharrer has his eye on some gently used lights. The lights were recently replaced in upgrades for the Blue Dome District.

The City of Tulsa has approved reusing the lights. Sharrer says the commission will ask Tulsa County to release Vision 2025 money from a nearly $700-thousand fund for overruns on the Route 66 Experience Museum and Visitor Center.

The Route 66 Experience has not been started yet. Sharrer says installing new street lights around Whittier Square may run around $160-thousand.

https://www.publicradiotulsa.org/post/recycled-light-kendall-whittier
https://kendallwhittierinc.org/
Logged

"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
patric
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 7439


These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #470 on: November 19, 2018, 03:57:23 pm »

Old Blue Dome Lights May Reappear on Route 66 in Kendall-Whitter Area

Tulsa’s Kendall-Whittier district is getting new street lighting that may look familiar.

Tulsa Route 66 Commission Chair and Kendall Whittier Main Street Executive Director Ed Sharrer said the city just finished installing new lights downtown in the Blue Dome District.

"It created a situation where the city had, now, gently used lights. And in Kendall Whittier, we have needed pedestrian-level street lighting for a long time. We’re a very active district, a very pedestrian-friendly district," Sharrer said.

The acorn lights fit the Route 66 aesthetic and are sitting in a downtown city yard for the taking. To pay for their installation, the Route 66 commission will ask Tulsa County to release Vision 2025 money from a nearly $700,000 fund for overruns on the Route 66 Experience museum and visitor center.

"There would be just enough funds to peel aside for this lighting project and still leave a good, healthy reserve for contingency on that project," Sharrer said.

The Route 66 Experience has not been started yet. Installation of the lights in Kendall-Whittier is estimated to cost around $160,000.

They would be installed along Admiral Boulevard and Lewis Avenue around Whittier Square.

"But, you know, as we grow over time, then, hopefully, we will have need for even more lighting in the future," Sharrer said.


https://www.publicradiotulsa.org/post/old-blue-dome-lights-may-reappear-route-66-kendall-whitter-area


Acorn lights might "fit the Route 66 aesthetic" but only in the daytime.  At night the high-intensity glare is anything but historic (acorns were nowhere near as bright) or safe (producing dangerous eye-level glare).

There are so many better choices for street lighting today that produce better, safer, more useful light for much less electricity, but our experiences with the Gathering Place or Cherry Street didnt serve as a lesson. 

Fortunately the taxpayers pick up the tab for the power bill and any future lawsuits. /s
Logged

"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
patric
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 7439


These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #471 on: December 17, 2018, 05:36:00 pm »

I have some tunable smart bulbs in lamps. With an app they can be changed anywhere between 2700 to 6500.

I also have RGB bulbs in all my outdoor fixtures and in my path lights and lights in my flower beds so I have instant holiday lighting anytime I want.

I shunned those for a while mainly because I dont own a bar, which quite frankly seemed to be the most practical use for them. 
They have come a long way since then, in terms of technological advance and practical home use.  When Phillips solved the "Power-On Behavior" with their Hue line (so they dont come on full brightness after a power bump) I was onboard, and see them as a likely candidate to replace the X-10 lighting controls I've been using since the 1970's.

For some folks, smart bulbs are their introduction to color temperature.  Being able to brighten and dim from your smartphone isnt enough once you can use that same control to shift the color temperature as well.

But this is a discussion of municipal street lighting, so I would be remiss if I didnt mention that there are modern LED streetlights that also do that, and "talk" to one another and relay commands to one another like color, intensity, and the status of the fixtures health.

Or we can just be thrilled we got some first-generation DOE welding-torch-like LEDs that weigh in at a hot blue 6000K for Tulsa streets.

I know we have people with vision that arent satisfied with just using whatever the salesmen has in the warehouse, and manage to make inroads here and there, but for Gods sake Tulsa is still installing Acorns as primary street lighting.
Logged

"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
Cetary
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 83


« Reply #472 on: January 22, 2019, 06:12:37 pm »

Finally some high quality video of a mass installation of PC Amber LED street lights.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RuYBdzKtHgg

I love it, so much like HPS. I'll just be leaving the states and their welding torch lights behind now...
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 12:26:15 pm by Cetary » Logged
patric
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 7439


These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #473 on: April 25, 2019, 10:31:14 am »

Whats sad is this isnt based on any study or warranting or any demonstrated need, just people's perception.  "Hey I wanna light in my yard that someone else pays for."

Most (if not all) wont even be modern technology; just a flood of inefficient, 1960's -style "Farm Lights" that are mostly glare and only put about 40% of their light on the street.  And we had been making such progress...



500 street lights might be coming soon to Tulsa neighborhoods.

In presenting his third city budget since his election in 2016, Mayor G.T. Bynum on Wednesday unveiled a plan that would literally make the city brighter with the addition of more than 500 neighborhood street lights.

Tulsa has not added a new neighborhood street light since 2009, when city leaders put in place a moratorium on new lights because of cost concerns. More than 500 requests have piled up since then.

“It is time to begin clearing this backlog and illuminating neighborhoods across the city,” Bynum said during his budget presentation to the City Council.

The new lights, which will be installed over three years, will cost the city approximately $50,000 a year to operate once they are all in place. Under the city’s franchise agreement with AEP-PSO, the utility will pay for the lights, install them and replace bulbs that burn out.

The city’s only obligation is to pay the electric bill to illuminate them.

“Thank you for allowing us the opportunity to turn on the lights,” said District 3 City Councilor Crista Patrick. “My neighborhood has been dark for way too long.”


https://www.tulsaworld.com/news/local/government-and-politics/street-lights-might-be-coming-soon-to-tulsa-neighborhoods-what/collection_8d1f2dde-9975-5b21-b308-a43236a9f0cf.html






Logged

"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
patric
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 7439


These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #474 on: October 02, 2019, 12:18:52 pm »

The City Council of Darlington, SC unanimously passed an upgraded lighting ordinance.  Like Flagstaff AZ, it has three lighting classes, (1) White, (2) Amber, (3) Decorative.

Unless someone knows differently, this is the only city in the east that has a maximum 2700K CCT for specific tasks.  The ordinance also requires fully shielded High Pressure Sodium or Phosphor-converted Amber fixtures with S/P ratio of 0.6 or less for lighting streets and roadways, parking areas, equipment storage yards, building mounted fixtures, with the exception of entry ways/exits, which can use 2700K fully shielded white-light fixtures.  Sports lighting is 5700K CCT maximum.  LED billboards aren't allowed.
Logged

"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
Cetary
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 83


« Reply #475 on: October 14, 2019, 06:28:38 pm »

It looks like 3000K isn't doing too well in residential in Montreal..

"Danielle Myrand, the resident who started the petition, said the new lights are too bright and white. She compared it to a “car flashing their high beams in your room...She also claims they ruin the aesthetic of the borough.
“We already have light that has a warm glow and we insist on keeping our borough this way because we have a country charm to it that is specific to our borough,” Myrand said."

https://globalnews.ca/news/6021460/ile-bizard-led-street-lights-petition/

This is the same city of Montreal that is converting its entire stock of 132K lights from 2100K HPS to 3000K LED. 3000K might've been the last word years ago, but the technology has dramatically improved. I hear that in Riverside they tested of variety of fixtures and found 2700K preferable for residential with either 2700K or 3000K for the larger streets. They went with the 14 watt 2700K GE Evolves on 25 foot poles for the initial refit. This is a big contrast to the 100/70 watt HPS that would typically be spec'd, but it shows how far we've come. As I understand, PC Amber has recently improved in efficiency once again, and now they are beginning to switch to PC Amber LED for residential. I'm hoping that they follow Los Angeles approach and replace their larger fixtures with the warmer toned LED's when they become available. 
Logged
patric
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 7439


These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #476 on: October 16, 2019, 02:07:54 pm »


3000K might've been the last word years ago, but the technology has dramatically improved. I hear that in Riverside they tested of variety of fixtures and found 2700K preferable for residential with either 2700K or 3000K for the larger streets. They went with the 14 watt 2700K GE Evolves on 25 foot poles for the initial refit. This is a big contrast to the 100/70 watt HPS that would typically be spec'd, but it shows how far we've come. As I understand, PC Amber has recently improved in efficiency once again, and now they are beginning to switch to PC Amber LED for residential. I'm hoping that they follow Los Angeles approach and replace their larger fixtures with the warmer toned LED's when they become available. 


I was very skeptical of the lighting for The Gathering Place but it turns out it was very well implemented:  Fully shielded, carefully aimed warm white that could easily be classified at or around 2700K -- in stark contrast to the nearby street and parking lot lighting which is mostly blue-rich, unshielded light.
The point being sometimes you just have to trust your eyes over specs on paper.

Tulsa has a two-steps-forward-one-step back approach in that we finally have an enforceable means of corralling commercial lighting but we just dont enforce it in most cases until there is a complaint.  Sadly, most people dont even know how to complain (or that they even have the right to) and even then the overworked code inspectors mostly inspect in the day when the lights are off.

At some point the movers-and-shakers will be exposed to enough examples of good lighting to understand how bad the bad lighting actually is, and will come to associate the DOE early-adopter 5000K blue-rich fixtures with the junk that clueless homeowners buy at Home Depot to annoy their neighbors.

Logged

"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
patric
T-Town Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 7439


These Aren't the Droids You're Looking For


« Reply #477 on: October 18, 2019, 10:52:23 am »

I was just sent the new lighting ordinance Darlington SC just passed, and Im including it here.  I found a few subtle errors and commentary will follow later.
Its interesting to see how these have adapted since the AMA linked blue-rich light at night with health problems.


ORDINANCE NO. 2019-21
OUTDOOR LIGHTING ORDINANCE

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DARLINGTON, SOUTH CAROLINA
The following shall replace Section 6-6 Outdoor lighting of Article VI of the Zoning Ordinance for the City of Darlington:

Section 6-6 OUTDOOR LIGHTING

Section 6-6.1 PURPOSE AND INTENT

These regulations are intended to prevent unnecessary up-light and light pollution; protect drivers and pedestrians from the glare of non-vehicular light sources, prohibit light trespass onto adjacent properties; promote energy savings by requiring responsible, efficient lighting design and operation; and maintain or improve nighttime public health, safety, security and productivity. These regulations apply, but are not limited to lighting for: Streets, Parking Areas, Walkways, Commercial, Industrial, Multi-family Residential, Public/Private Recreational/Sports, Signs/Billboards, Architectural Lighting, Outdoor Display/Sales Areas, and Equipment Storage Areas.

Section 6-6.2 EXTERIOR ILLUMINATION

LIGHTING CLASSES

Class 1 Lighting: (White) All outdoor lighting used for, but not limited to, outdoor sales or eating areas, building entryways/exits, gas station canopies, assembly or repair areas, advertising or other signs, recreational facilities and other similar applications where Color Rendition is important to preserve the effectiveness of the activity.

Class 2 Lighting: (Amber) All outdoor lighting used for, but not limited to, illumination for driveways and walkways, streets and roadways, equipment yards, parking lots and other outdoor security where General Illumination for safety or security of the grounds is the primary concern.

Class 3 Lighting: (White/Amber/All Colors) Any outdoor lighting used for Decorative Effects including, but not limited to, architectural illumination, flag and monument lighting, and illumination of trees, shrubbery, and other vegetation.

All new or replacement outdoor lighting fixtures with an initial output over 900 lumens shall be fully shielded fixtures emitting no light at per above the 90-degree horizontal plane through the lowest part of the fixture. Furthermore, light emissions at all lateral angles around the fixtures shall not exceed 10% of the total lumen output at 80-degrees up from vertical, i.e. directly below the fixture. The IESNA BUG Rating shall not exceed B1, U0, G1. The Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) of all fixtures shall not exceed 2700K (Kelvin) unless otherwise specified. Lighting shall be designed, installed, and maintained to prevent direct glare for drivers and pedestrians and light trespass across adjacent property lines. For perimeter lighting in areas abutting residential properties, B0 and G0 shall not be exceeded.

(1)   Lighting for streets and parking areas shall be Class 2 and shall be either High Pressure Sodium (HPS) or Phospher-converted Amber LED (PCALED) with S/P ratio of 0.6 or less and utilize fully shielded fixtures.

(2)   Building mounted wall-pack fixtures shall be fully shielded. Class 1 lighting shall be used for building entryways and exits, and Class 2 lighting shall be used for general illumination.

(3)   “Dusk-to-Dawn” security lights shall be Class 2 and utilize fully shielded fixtures.

(4)   Due to the excessive glare produced by unshielded high-lumen Historical fixtures, all new or replacement fixtures shall be fully shield and not exceed a G1 Glare Rating.

(5)   Floodlight Shielding and Aiming Criteria
Floodlighting is discouraged, but if used must be fully shielded and aimed at a maximum vertical angle not to exceed forty-five (45) degrees defined as the angle formed between the central beam axis and the vertical axis directly below the fixture mounting. Fixtures shall be equipped with a deep-visor (shield) that extends forward from the face of the lens by a minimum distance equal to the vertical height of the lens opening. Floodlights shall be aimed so that the central beam axis falls within the property lines for all applications to
   (1) Prevent direct light (glare) onto the public right-of-way,
   (2) Prevent glare and light trespass onto residential properties, and
   (3) Prevent unnecessary up-light. (Refer to the City floodlight information sheet.)

(6)   Illumination Levels
For all lighting applications the “maintained horizontal illuminance recommendations” set by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) shall not be exceeded.

(7)   Off-Site Light Trespass
In commercial areas, light projected onto other commercial properties shall not exceed 1.0 foot-candle. However, any light projected onto abutting residential properties shall not exceed 0.1 foot-candle. All measurements shall be taken at five (5) feet above grade level at the property line.

(Cool   Vegetation screens or any other type of buffer shall not be employed to serve as the primary means for controlling glare and light trespass. Rather, glare and light trespass control shall be achieved primarily through the use of such means as fully shielded fixtures, shields and baffles, and appropriate application of fixture mounting height, wattage, aiming angle, and fixture placement.

(9)   Resumption of Use After Abandonment
If a property with non-conforming lighting is abandoned, then all outdoor lighting is reviewed and brought into compliance before the use is resumed.

 6-6.3 CANOPY LIGHTING/BUILDING OVERHANGS (Class 1 Lighting)

(1)   Light fixtures for gas station/convenience store canopies shall be recessed and have a flat lens mounted flush with the surface (ceiling) of the canopy so as to minimize off-site glare and light trespass. LED fixtures shall also be recessed and have a fully shielded light distribution. The IESNA recommended average maintained horizontal illuminance levels for all areas shall not be exceeded. All area lighting shall be Class 2 and utilize fully shielded fixtures.
(2)   Lighting for fast food, bank, drugstore drive-ups; motel, hotel, theater, bays, loading and unloading spaces; and all other canopies or overhands shall utilize recessed, fully shielded fixtures. All area lighting shall be Class 2 and utilize fully shielded fixtures.

6-6.4 SPORTS/RECREATIONAL LIGHTING (Class 1 Lighting)

Fixtures used for sport and recreational lighting shall be fully shielded so as to prevent direct glare and light trespass into residential areas and roadways adjacent to the sports facility, and to prevent wasteful uplight. The Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) shall not exceed 5700K. The hours of operations shall not exceed one hour after the end of the event or 12:00 midnight, whichever is sooner unless authorized in writing by the City.

6-6.5 OUTDOOR DISPLAY/SALES AREAS (Class 1 Lighting)

All lighting fixtures shall be fully shielded and be designed, installed, and maintained to prevent direct glare and light trespass onto adjacent roadways or residential areas, and to prevent unnecessary uplight. Lighting for all areas shall not exceed the IESNA recommendations for average maintained horizontal illuminance levels.

6-6.6 SIGNS/BILLBOARDS (Class 1 Lighting)

(1) Externally illuminated signs and billboards shall use top mounted and fully shielded fixtures that direct light downward onto, but not beyond, the sign or billboard facade. Lighting shall not exceed 200 initial lumens per square foot.

(2) Internally illuminated signs shall have a dark (opaque) background that allows light to shine only through the lettering or logo to minimize detrimental effects.

(3) Digital Signs: At no point on the face of the sign shall the luminance exceed 4,500 nits during daylight hours. Signs shall be dimmed automatically at sunset to 10 p.m. and shall not exceed 100 nits when the display is set to show maximum white (100% full white mode). Displays must be cut off or turned to 0% brightness between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. If a business operates after 10 p.m., the displays must be cut off or turned to 0% brightness when the business closes.

6-6.7 ARCHITECTURAL/LANDSCAPE/ACCENT LIGHTING (Class 3 Lighting)

(1)   The maximum illuminance on any vertical surface or angular roof shall not exceed 3.0 average maintained foot-candles. Light fixtures shall be fully shielded, located, and aimed so that light is directed only onto the building facade. Fixtures shall not be directed toward adjacent streets or properties. To the extent practicable, fixtures shall be mounted on the building and directed downward to “wash” the facade or roof with light.

(2)   Landscape lighting shall be of low intensity (low voltage) for a subtle lighting effect and use fully shielded narrow-beam fixtures that prevent glare, light trespass, and uplight from spilling beyond their primary target. Down-lighting is encouraged.

(3)   For statues or other objects that cannot be illuminated by down-lighting, low intensity up-lighting may be used so long as the fixtures are fully shielded and are a narrow-cone spotlight which confines the light to the object of interest.

(4)   Fixtures for lighting flags shall have a maximum of 5000 initial lumens and be equipped with a narrow cone shield.

6-6.8 EXEMPTIONS

(1) Individual homeowners.
(2) Traditional seasonal lighting.
(3) Temporary lighting used while the performance of their duties by Law Enforcement, Fire Department, and Emergency Services shall be exempt.
(4) Federal hazard warning lights.

6-6.9 GRANDFATHERING

(1) Lamp (bulb) replacement with original wattage/lumens is permissible, but fixtures shall meet the fully shielded requirements of this Ordinance if replaced, moved, modified, or repaired. Ballast replacement is considered a repair. A replacement fixture shall not increase the wattage or lumen output of the original fixture.

(2) Any grandfathered fixture deemed by the Building Official to cause nuisance glare or create a safety hazard, i.e., discomfort or disability glare, shall be made to comply with these regulations within 60 days.

6-6.10 SITE PLAN SUBMISSION REQUIRED

An electrical permit is required when installing outdoor lighting. To show compliance, the City requires that any person applying for a permit involving outdoor lighting fixtures, including signs, shall submit plans and descriptions showing the locations, types of fixtures, mounting heights, lamps, supports, poles, manufacturer’s catalog cuts, and photometric data.

The lighting plan shall include a minimum of the following:
(1)   Site plan drawn to scale including permanent structures and point-to-point illuminance levels laid out in a standard grid pattern.

(2)   Fixture schedule including, but not limited to, manufacturer, catalog number, lamp type, IESNA pattern type, longitudinal distribution, light loss factor applied, initial luminous output of the lamp(s) in lumens, number of lamps for each fixture.

(3)   System statistics schedule shall include average maintained illuminance for each designated task area, minimum and maximum luminance, max/min uniformity, and average/minimum uniformity ratio.

(4)   Lighting power density expressed in watts per square foot for each specific task area to be illuminated.

(5)   Under no conditions shall the entire parcel square footage by used to develop the average illuminance level.

Should any type of fixture or type of light source be changed after the permit is issued, a change request must be submitted to the Building Official for approval, together with adequate information to assure compliance with this Ordinance, which must be submitted prior to substitution.

6-6.11 DEFINITIONS

BUG: The lighting Industry’s Rating System that classifies the amount of Backlight (B), Uplight (U), and Glare (G) of a fixture.

CCT: Correlated Color Temperature, measured in degrees Kelvin (K), is a numerical figure used to describe the apparent color of light in the visual spectrum. The lower the Kelvin number, the more eye friendly and “warm” the light appears; the higher the Kelvin number, the “bluer” and “harsher” the light appears to our eyes. (See Spectral Power Distribution)

Class 1 Lighting: See Section 6-6.2 LIGHTING CLASSES

Class 2 Lighting: See Section 6-6.2 LIGHTING CLASSES

Class 3 Lighting: See Section 6-6.2 LIGHTING CLASSES

Curfew: A time established for listed lighting systems to be automatically extinguished or reduced each night.

Direct Light: Light that can be seen directly from the light source and other light-emitting or refracting elements of the fixture. (See also Glare)
Fixture: Refers to all component parts such as the housing, lamp, lens, reflectors, refracting lens, internal refracting elements or louvers,and mounting brackets of the lighting apparatus.

Foot-candle: A standard unit of measurement representing the density of luminous flux falling upon a surface. One foot-candle equals one lumen per square foot.

Fully Shielded Fixture: A fixture constructed and installed in such a manner that all light emitted by it, either directly from the lamp or a diffusing element, or indirectly by reflection or refraction from any part of the fixture, is projected below the horizontal plane through the fixture’s lowest light-emitting part. A fully shielded fixture will have a BUG Up-light Rating of U0 (U Zero).

Glare: Direct light emitting from a fixture with an intensity great enough in contrast to the field of view to reduce a viewer’s ability to see and in many cases causing momentary blindness and possible discomfort. (See Veiling Luminance)

IESNA: Illuminating Engineering Society of North America. The organization that established recommended safe lighting levels for the lighting industry. Refer to www.iesna.org.

LED: Light Emitting Diode.

Light Pollution: All adverse effects of outdoor lighting that means, but not limited to, light emitted above the horizontal plane into the sky, but also includes glare, light trespass, energy waste from overly bright applications, and visual clutter. (Scientific Definition: Introduction by humans, directly or indirectly, of artificial light into the environment)

Light Trespass: Direct light from a fixture that shines beyond the boundaries of the property on which the fixture is located. It is light that intrudes into an area where it is not wanted or does not belong.

Low-voltage landscape lighting: Lighting systems powered by 15 volts or less, a maximum of 525 lumens, and suitable for landscape lighting by listing.

Lumen: A standard unit of measurement referring to the amount of light energy emitted by a light source.

Maintained Illuminance: Illuminance levels calculated by the application of an appropriate light loss factor (LLF) to initial lamp lumens that accommodate the normal depreciating effects of operational use on a lighting system.

Non-essential lighting: Lighting that serves an intended purpose but, to save energy, can be extinguished after the purpose has been served. Example: Lighting for a business sign is considered non-essential because it can be extinguished at the conclusion of business.

Spectral Power Distribution: A lamp’s spectral power distribution (SPD) is a quantitative measure in nanometers of the amount of energy (power) emitted at different wavelengths. The higher the SPD number, the more eye-friendly and “warm” the light appears. The lower the SPD number, the “bluer” and “harsher” the light appears to our eyes.

Use, Abandonment of: The relinquishment of a property, or cessation of use or activity, by the owner or tenant A use shall be deemed abandoned when such use is evidence by the cessation of activities or conditions which constitute the principle use of the property.

Veiling Luminance: A luminance superimposed on the retinal image which reduces its contrast. It is this veiling luminance produced by bright sources or areas in the visual field that results in decreased visual performance and visibility. (Also known as Disability Glare).

DONE AND RATIFIED in City Council
Logged

"Tulsa will lay off police and firemen before we will cut back on unnecessarily wasteful streetlights."  -- March 18, 2009 TulsaNow Forum
Cetary
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 83


« Reply #478 on: October 25, 2019, 10:31:53 am »

Flagstaff goes with a hybrid install with Narrow Band Amber and Phospher Converted Amber

https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/10/how-flagstaff-arizona-switched-to-leds-without-giving-astronomers-a-headache/?comments=1&start=120

"The problem with LEDs boils down to blue light. Older streetlights are high-pressure sodium bulbs, which produce a warm yellow glow around a color temperature of 2,000 K. The bulbs Flagstaff relied on for most of its streetlights were low-pressure sodium—a variant that only emits light at a single wavelength (589 nanometers) near that yellow color, producing something resembling candlelight. Many of the LED streetlights on the market have much cooler color temperatures of 3,000 or even 4,000 K.
As Lowell Observatory Director Jeff Hall told Ars, “As day turns to night and your photopic cone-based vision turns into scotopic, rod-based vision, your sensitivity shifts a little bit blue. And so very blue-rich light at night comes off as really harsh and glaring and creates a lot of visible skyglow. So the less of that spectrum you touch, the better off you are for both visual observations, the night sky, as well as astronomy.”
Hall continued: “I see this wherever I go in my travels. By default, cities just put up, you know, 3,000 degrees CCT white, sometimes 4,000, which is this blue light. Just lumen for lumen [that] will create two-and-a-half to three times the skyglow of a high-pressure sodium system and, like, six times the skyglow of a low-pressure sodium system..."
Logged
Cetary
Activist
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 83


« Reply #479 on: November 01, 2019, 07:37:18 pm »

They've done a car dealership in hybrid PC Amber/White LED!







Current model PC Amber LED provides quite sufficient color rendering of 50-70 while mitigating the negative effects of the "blue spike." White light, however, is still used to carefully illuminate the sales area. The amber/red color combination looks good! I find it humorous that an entity, car dealership, that is typically used when ridiculing overly bright 4000K residential light installations has now done exceptional. This is how outdoor lighting of the 21st century, LED, should look and should be done. The only thing I might improve upon would be the quality of the white LED. These can typically be of higher CRI/R9 being closer to a true black body,further reducing the blue spike.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2019, 07:39:11 pm by Cetary » Logged
Pages: 1 ... 30 31 [32]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
  Hosted by TulsaConnect and Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
 

Mission

 

"TulsaNow's Mission is to help Tulsa become the most vibrant, diverse, sustainable and prosperous city of our size. We achieve this by focusing on the development of Tulsa's distinctive identity and economic growth around a dynamic, urban core, complemented by a constellation of livable, thriving communities."
more...

 

Contact

 

2210 S Main St.
Tulsa, OK 74114
(918) 409-2669
info@tulsanow.org