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Not At My Table - Political Discussions => National & International Politics => Topic started by: patric on March 04, 2016, 11:39:20 pm



Title: fbiOS
Post by: patric on March 04, 2016, 11:39:20 pm
Defense secretary calls BS on FBI claim America safer with weaker data security


Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter assured an audience of computer security experts Wednesday that he was not in favor of a “back door” that would give the government access to data that is protected by encryption.

Speaking at the annual RSA Conference, Secretary Carter sought common ground with companies worried by Apple’s fight with the Federal Bureau of Investigation over access to an iPhone.

“Just to cut to the chase, I’m not a believer in back doors or a single technical approach,” Secretary Carter said to loud applause during a panel discussion at the conference. “I don’t think it’s realistic. I don’t think that’s technically accurate.”

Apple is resisting a court order that would require it to create software to break the password mechanism in an iPhone used by one of the assailants in the December shooting in San Bernardino, Calif.

The F.B.I. argues that it is not asking for any sort of permanent back door and is merely asking for help in circumventing a single phone’s password protection.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/03/technology/defense-secretary-takes-position-against-a-data-back-door.html


Meanwhile, hundreds of "single phones" seized all over the U.S. await their turn.
http://www.cnet.com/news/apple-deluged-by-police-demands-to-decrypt-iphones


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: AquaMan on March 05, 2016, 09:18:51 am
Answer me this. When has a technology, or for that matter any innovation, remained solely the province of one country or entity? There are no technologies that can't eventually be stolen, copied, circumvented or overcome in some manner. History is replete with attempts but I am not aware of any successes in keeping new things to themselves. From the China Wall to airplanes, German code breakers, rockets, space exploration, nuclear to todays I-phones. There is no real security.

Did anyone see the founder of the security software company who said, "give me five tech experts and a week and I'll break into the terrorists I-phone". Can't remember his name but he is quite infamous.

Why do we continue to believe we can keep security by blocking our own access to it? Better to keep changing, evolving, misleading, out thinking our enemies to continually stay a step ahead instead of promoting a falsehood. Or maybe that's what all this is.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: TulsaMoon on March 05, 2016, 09:43:49 am
Answer me this. When has a technology, or for that matter any innovation, remained solely the province of one country or entity? There are no technologies that can't eventually be stolen, copied, circumvented or overcome in some manner. History is replete with attempts but I am not aware of any successes in keeping new things to themselves. From the China Wall to airplanes, German code breakers, rockets, space exploration, nuclear to todays I-phones. There is no real security.

Did anyone see the founder of the security software company who said, "give me five tech experts and a week and I'll break into the terrorists I-phone". Can't remember his name but he is quite infamous.

Why do we continue to believe we can keep security by blocking our own access to it? Better to keep changing, evolving, misleading, out thinking our enemies to continually stay a step ahead instead of promoting a falsehood. Or maybe that's what all this is.

I think that was McAfee? Isn't that the guy hiding in another country somewhere for fear of facing some sort of criminal charges?

Completely agree with your post. It's area 51. It doesn't exist, nothing to see here. Promote the opposite and cause a conspiracy theory. If one tech guy has confidence that he can crack that phone in 5 days, I bet my favorite purple shorts that it has already been cracked by our Government and that this smoke screen is to make the people think they can't crack it and give us all comfort knowing our naked selfies are safe.....see, it's working.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: AquaMan on March 05, 2016, 10:53:45 am
Yes, McAfee. He got in some physical altercation and is accused of murder I think.

This might be a new record. We solved this mystery in three posts!



Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on March 05, 2016, 11:23:16 am
Why do we continue to believe we can keep security by blocking our own access to it? Better to keep changing, evolving, misleading, out thinking our enemies to continually stay a step ahead instead of promoting a falsehood. Or maybe that's what all this is.

http://venturebeat.com/2016/02/27/the-fbis-apple-hack-would-be-a-big-shiny-gift-to-criminals

Think of what online banking would be without encryption.  ...Then look at the track record of the people that insist they can keep backdoors out of the hands of bad guys.  A 16-year-old in England waltzed through the FBI's database recently, sheesh.

The only thing different about the San Bernadino case and the hundreds (if not thousands) of cases before it is the FBI was able to attach the word "terrorism" to it so they could try the case in the media.

Oh and McAfee. Noone has made a movie about him yet?  The Belize government lost interest in his "crimes" once they seized his mansion, so it looks like his biggest legal problem is a DUI in Tennessee.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_McAfee


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: AquaMan on March 05, 2016, 12:24:08 pm
You couldn't have online banking without encryption, but you can't rely on the same encryption for very long. Banks and credit card companies are subject to the same 15 year old hackers unless they constantly dodge and weave. So, I think both parties to this argument are being quite dishonest. There is no safety, there is no security without constant vigilance.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: sgrizzle on March 05, 2016, 09:49:58 pm
This would all be simpler if Apple couldn't hack in, and that is almost true at this point. The only way to do a "backdoor" in this situation is to upgrade with a hacked version of the OS. I'm guessing an update from Apple will make it so you can't force an upgrade like that without wiping the data.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: AquaMan on March 06, 2016, 09:04:59 am
I'm obviously not a tech mindset. What do you think of McAfee's statement that, given a week and some help, he could break into the I-phone?


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: BKDotCom on March 06, 2016, 10:40:56 am
I'm obviously not a tech mindset. What do you think of McAfee's statement that, given a week and some help, he could break into the I-phone?

He's full of it
http://arstechnica.com/security/2016/03/john-mcafee-better-prepare-to-eat-a-shoe-because-he-doesnt-know-how-iphones-work/


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: AquaMan on March 06, 2016, 12:39:52 pm
He's been consuming too much of the island rum.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: Vashta Nerada on March 06, 2016, 07:40:10 pm
(http://i.imgur.com/wa33b4A.jpg)


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: heironymouspasparagus on March 07, 2016, 09:36:04 am
Evidently the FBI had access to the phone and screwed it up somehow...not sure what they did, but sounded like they tried to change the password, or otherwise messed it up.

When ya got something that is working - first, don't screw it up!!

Not a lot of sympathy for their arguments here just yet.



Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: cannon_fodder on March 07, 2016, 10:05:21 am
Evidently the FBI had access to the phone and screwed it up somehow...not sure what they did, but sounded like they tried to change the password, or otherwise messed it up.

When ya got something that is working - first, don't screw it up!!

Not a lot of sympathy for their arguments here just yet.

By resetting the password law enforcement could gain access to his backup files - which do not have the same level of encryption and are subject to subpoena. However, they did not allow the phone to backup prior to resetting the password (presumably by bringing it within range of open wifi?). Thus, the data they gained access to was not the most current data.

I have little sympathy for the FBI position. I have zero sympathy for the terrorists, but allowing access to everything is not the solution to a single problem. As has been pointed out ad naseum, if the FBI can have access so can China and Russia and Iran (and Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and...). I'm not even comfortable with our government having access - we know they always say it will only be used in a limited way, and then we learn that the limited way is often "because he maybe possible thought someone said something mean about his wife" or the mayor or whatever.

They have the meta data showing every person he was in contact with. They can gain access to his email account. They can review his backup files. They can correspond with the recipients of his contacts and see what was discussed. The can contact his ISP and see what website he has been visiting. Using the GPS settings and tower pings they can track his location back a couple of months. I'm not saying there isn't something useful - but I doubt there is anything grounbreaking.

And that's ignoring my issue with Uncle Sam telling Apple they have to make a master key. Tell Ford the same thing? How about my gun safe? Safety deposit box?  Oh, right... they aren't worried about those things, because if they wanted to get in they'd just break in. So no problem there.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on March 07, 2016, 11:22:40 am

I have little sympathy for the FBI position. I have zero sympathy for the terrorists, but allowing access to everything is not the solution to a single problem. As has been pointed out ad naseum, if the FBI can have access so can China and Russia and Iran (and Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and...). I'm not even comfortable with our government having access - we know they always say it will only be used in a limited way, and then we learn that the limited way is often "because he maybe possible thought someone said something mean about his wife" or the mayor or whatever.

When "the authorities" run the spectrum from "San Bernardino police chief says there's a 'reasonably good chance that there's nothing of any value' on shooter's iPhone" to "it may harbor a 'lying-dormant cyber pathogen'" we could just as easily say that we need to crack these "dangerous products" (DA's words) to protect against ninja attacks and uncover the existence of God, because you cant prove that data ISNT there. 

When even the former heads of NSA and DHS say the FBI picked the wrong test case...



Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: sgrizzle on March 07, 2016, 11:58:38 am
In the meantime, Amazon removed encryption from all of their devices and then rapidly said they will put it back.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: BKDotCom on March 07, 2016, 11:59:36 am
I'm obviously not a tech mindset. What do you think of McAfee's statement that, given a week and some help, he could break into the I-phone?

He's now admitted to lying "to 'get a s**tload of public attention'"
http://www.dailydot.com/politics/john-mcafee-lied-iphone-apple-fbi/


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: cannon_fodder on March 07, 2016, 12:19:04 pm
I thought it was long ago established that McAfee isn't exactly stable.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: dbacksfan 2.0 on March 07, 2016, 01:37:35 pm
I thought it was long ago established that McAfee isn't exactly stable.

McAfee or their software?


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: cannon_fodder on March 07, 2016, 01:55:48 pm
The man.

This is the first image that comes up when you Google his name. Hit #1.
(http://cdni.wired.co.uk/1240x826/k_n/McAfee.jpg)


http://www.businessinsider.com/the-insane-life-of-john-mcafee-2015-7

http://gizmodo.com/heres-crazy-person-john-mcafee-in-another-bizarre-yout-1219244427

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_McAfee#In_popular_culture


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: dbacksfan 2.0 on March 07, 2016, 03:08:07 pm
Well I guess that explains why their software works so erratically...........


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: swake on March 07, 2016, 03:48:10 pm
Well I guess that explains why their software works so erratically...........

He hasn't been involved with the company in a very long time.

McAfee the software often seems like malware itself to me.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on March 17, 2016, 09:06:12 pm
Polk County (Florida) Sheriff Grady Judd has already passed judgment on Apple's stance.

"I can tell you, the first time we do have trouble getting into a cell phone, we're going to seek a court order from Apple," he said. "And when they deny us, I'm going to go lock the CEO of Apple up. I'll lock the rascal up."

He preaches from pulpits in uniform. When once asked why his officers had shot at a suspect 110 times, hitting him 68 times, he explained that it was "all the ammunition they had."


http://www.cnet.com/news/florida-sheriff-says-hell-lock-rascal-tim-cook-in-jail/













Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on March 24, 2016, 12:02:55 am

The Company Helping Unlock the San Bernardino iPhone Has a Long History of Selling Gear to US Police


http://gizmodo.com/the-company-helping-unlock-the-san-bernardino-iphone-ha-1766641607



Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: Hoss on March 29, 2016, 06:49:41 am
Looks like they were successful in cracking the phone without Apple's help.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2016/03/28/apple-justice-department-farook/82354040/


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on March 29, 2016, 09:39:49 am
Looks like they were successful in cracking the phone without Apple's help.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2016/03/28/apple-justice-department-farook/82354040/

That's what the FBI said a few hours before they were to go into court and explain to a judge how there was no other way...then its "Oh, we didnt need you after all."

For years, Apple has been complying with sealed orders to cooperate with the courts over seized iPhones, but this time the feds had the word "terrorism" to throw around and they decided to try this one in the court of public opinion instead (where they lost).

But now that the FBI has "discovered" a vulnerability potentially affecting the security of millions of Americans, will they uphold any obligation to disclose the vulnerability to the vendor (Apple) for the purpose of closing the hole and keeping those Americans safe?

Building up a huge stockpile of undisclosed vulnerabilities while leaving the Internet vulnerable and the American people unprotected would not be in our national security interest. (the Vulnerabilities Equities Process)
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/03/feds-mum-if-they-will-disclose-how-fbi-got-data-from-seized-iphone/

Or will they just be hypocrites?  Not too long ago there was a hacker working for a security firm who discovered a security flaw with AT&T, but when he told the media instead of quietly informing AT&T, he was sentenced to 41 months in prison for violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2143180/atandt-hacker-weev-released-from-prison-after-appeals-court-overturns-conviction.html


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: AquaMan on March 29, 2016, 10:51:40 am
The ethics and integrity complications are staggering.

Of course the government isn't going to help Apple. There is no reciprocal agreement. No quid pro quo. The feds feel they are on a mission to protect our safety from those that would rob us of our freedoms. If they have to put us in harm's way in the process, well, that's just the cost of freedom. Apple doesn't trust them, we don't trust them either, but we should be more skeptical of Apple's motives as well. They lied to us too.

Its too bad this all became public knowledge. Now people realize they were lied to by all the parties. There is no safe communication no matter what Apple says, and there is no obligation for the government to share their intel. The public be damned.



Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: Vashta Nerada on March 29, 2016, 06:31:38 pm

Looks like they were successful in cracking the phone without Apple's help.



So were they lying then or are they lying now?

There are thousands of "just one phone"s all over the country that police are anxious to rummage thru.




Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: heironymouspasparagus on March 30, 2016, 09:14:21 am

So were they lying then or are they lying now?

There are thousands of "just one phone"s all over the country that police are anxious to rummage thru.






Yes.  They were lying than and they are lying now.




Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: AquaMan on April 02, 2016, 08:12:48 am
Why isn't anyone in the press or among our more intelligent humans, questioning whether the feds have actually broken the code for these phones? The underlying principles of national security, CIA, FBI, whomever, is to offer misleading, misinformation. Truth is "out there" but only a small group actually know whether they got into that phone.

That uncertainty works very well for them both legally and in the real world.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on April 02, 2016, 12:57:58 pm


Yes.  They were lying than and they are lying now.




Something that always stood out about the fed's "only one phone" terrorism argument:


14 people were killed and 22 were seriously injured when two San Bernardino County Health Department employees attacked co-workers.

14 people were killed and 20 were seriously injured when an Edmond Oklahoma postal employee attacked co-workers.


One was "workplace violence," the other was "terrorism."  One was a county office, the other was a federal facility full of federal employees.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: Vashta Nerada on April 02, 2016, 03:29:40 pm
Why isn't anyone in the press or among our more intelligent humans, questioning whether the feds have actually broken the code for these phones? The underlying principles of national security, CIA, FBI, whomever, is to offer misleading, misinformation. Truth is "out there" but only a small group actually know whether they got into that phone.

That uncertainty works very well for them both legally and in the real world.




We certainly knew the "just one phone" was a lie.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/fbi-pledges-to-assist-local-police-in-unlocking-iphones/
Less than a week after the FBI was able to unlock an iPhone used by the San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook, the federal investigators are pledging to help local law enforcement departments facing similar problems.
In a letter to local police departments, the FBI offered their assistance in hacking the Apple phones.




"Your friend over there talking to the other cop told us everything, but if you want to fill in any blanks..."

http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/7feafff857cb6e6bcb76d228a6e4eb762ccb16a4/c=105-0-3495-
(http://2549&r=x513&c=680x510/local/-/media/2016/04/02/Phoenix/Phoenix/635951592923774820-RESIZEBenson-COLOR--Little-Pig-FBI-Phone-04-03-16.jpg)






Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: Vashta Nerada on February 04, 2017, 06:53:15 pm
Hacker releases tools FBI used to crack San Bernardino attacker's iPhone online

Last year, the FBI ordered Apple to help crack the iPhone 5c owned by Syed Farook, one of the shooters in the 2015 attacks in San Bernardino. Apple refused, and the FBI reportedly worked with Cellebrite, an Israeli firm that specializes in mobile security. According to a statement from Celelbrite last month, a hacker breached one of its legacy servers. Now the hacker has released some of that data as a warning to the FBI.
The data released includes code that seems to relate to Cellebrite's Universal Forensic Extraction Device (UFED), and can allegedly crack older iPhones like the 5c as well as Android and Blackberry devices.
Speaking anonymously to Motherboard, the hacker explained that simply creating these tools makes their release inevitable, where they can be used by anyone with technical knowledge, including oppressive regimes around the world.
"It's important to demonstrate that when you create these tools, they will make it out. History should make that clear," they told Motherboard.

https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/03/ios-cracking-tools-fbi-released/



A Motherboard investigation found that US state police and highway patrol agencies have collectively spent millions of dollars on Cellebrite technology.
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/us-state-police-have-spent-millions-on-israeli-phone-cracking-tech-cellebrite

When cops have a phone to break into, they just pull a small, laptop-sized device out of a rugged briefcase. After plugging the phone in with a cable, and a few taps of a touch-screen, the cops have now bypassed the phone's passcode. Almost like magic, they now have access to call logs, text messages, and in some cases even deleted data.

State police forces and highway patrols in the US have collectively spent millions of dollars on this sort of technology to break into and extract data from mobile phones, according to documents obtained by Motherboard.






Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: TeeDub on February 05, 2017, 05:38:23 am

If you spent any time around IT people, you would realize that phones (and deleted data) are not secure.   A simple warrant would produce all your phone records and text messages.   Likewise, data, even deleted data, is often not as gone as people may like it to be.

I also realize that this box could produce all that without the benefit of due process, so giving it to random police officers invites abuse.


I would also bet that in the 1980s and 1990s the people at the NSA would never have guessed that the public would NOT ONLY carry their own tracking and eavesdropping devices around....   But PAY for the privilege.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: Vashta Nerada on February 06, 2017, 08:08:20 pm
If you spent any time around IT people, you would realize that phones (and deleted data) are not secure.   A simple warrant would produce all your phone records and text messages.   Likewise, data, even deleted data, is often not as gone as people may like it to be.

I also realize that this box could produce all that without the benefit of due process, so giving it to random police officers invites abuse.


Just had to read thru this thread again to see how Apple CEO Tim Cook nailed it.
 
"Oh we need new weapons to use against terrorists but we're the FBI and we can keep those weapons out of the hands of terrorists."

Thanks for making ISIS job easier, and helping out with the election.



Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: heironymouspasparagus on February 09, 2017, 05:01:03 pm
There was - and still is - available an encryption code that appears to be pretty stout - such that it seems like someone put a bug in the developer's ear to stop making it so good.  So, they just shut it down.  I suspect in fear for their lives.

TrueCrypt supports a concept called plausible deniability - that the encryption leaves so little trace that it's presence cannot be confirmed let alone decoded...whatever you have encrypted is as if it did not exist at all.  The powers that be cannot allow that.  So,  the "new" path is Bitlocker - really good, but apparently easier to 'break', and commercial, so more subject to leverage by outside parties.  Microsoft distributes it with Win 7, et al, so really,...how good can it be...?

For anyone interested in really digging deep, even the source code is available for one to look through.

For anyone geeky enough to still be reading this note, part of the story of TrueCrypt;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TrueCrypt




Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: Vashta Nerada on May 15, 2017, 09:41:43 pm
Why not letting the feds have an iPhone back door was the right choice.


U.S. Government Fears a Monday Explosion of the Ransomware Plague It Helped Create (http://gizmodo.com/u-s-government-fears-a-monday-explosion-of-the-ransomw-1795208518)

    This attack provides yet another example of why the stockpiling of vulnerabilities by governments is such a problem. This is an emerging pattern in 2017. We have seen vulnerabilities stored by the CIA show up on WikiLeaks, and now this vulnerability stolen from the NSA has affected customers around the world. Repeatedly, exploits in the hands of governments have leaked into the public domain and caused widespread damage. An equivalent scenario with conventional weapons would be the U.S. military having some of its Tomahawk missiles stolen. And this most recent attack represents a completely unintended but disconcerting link between the two most serious forms of cybersecurity threats in the world today – nation-state action and organized criminal action.

The governments of the world should treat this attack as a wake-up call
.



Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: TeeDub on May 16, 2017, 08:53:15 am

The patch has been available since March!

Maybe people should patch their systems within 90 days for critical updates.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: swake on May 16, 2017, 11:20:43 am
The patch has been available since March!

Maybe people should patch their systems within 90 days for critical updates.

There was no patch for idiots still running XP/Server 2003 until this week.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on May 16, 2017, 12:54:25 pm
There was no patch for idiots still running XP/Server 2003 until this week.

Like almost all bank ATMs and most machines at work.  I understood Win7 and 8 are also part of the toolkit.
NSA kept the vulnerability secret so they could use it themselves to "fight terrorism" so of course the terrorists turned it on us while the NSA sat back and watched.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: heironymouspasparagus on May 16, 2017, 01:10:42 pm
Like almost all bank ATMs and most machines at work.  I understood Win7 and 8 are also part of the toolkit.
NSA kept the vulnerability secret so they could use it themselves to "fight terrorism" so of course the terrorists turned it on us while the NSA sat back and watched.


"Stress test" for the system.  See where the vulnerabilities are - which they already knew - but let it expand to see how far the tentacles extend.



Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: sgrizzle on May 16, 2017, 03:23:35 pm
Like almost all bank ATMs and most machines at work.  I understood Win7 and 8 are also part of the toolkit.
NSA kept the vulnerability secret so they could use it themselves to "fight terrorism" so of course the terrorists turned it on us while the NSA sat back and watched.

Like Patric said, most computers you see in restaurants, doctor's offices, ATMs and other "nontraditional" environments are probably running an old version of Windows in the background.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: heironymouspasparagus on May 16, 2017, 04:14:03 pm
Like Patric said, most computers you see in restaurants, doctor's offices, ATMs and other "nontraditional" environments are probably running an old version of Windows in the background.


Another really scary thing is Windows CE - an old "semi-industrial" version of Win that is still used in some industrial control environments.  Just wait until your air conditioner and building automation system at work gets hacked and starts turning on heat and air at the wrong time - heat in summer, cool in winter, or both at the same time.  Turns lights on/off at random.  Locks doors.  Stops elevators.  Sets of fire alarms at random...   Gonna be some fun times...!


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on May 19, 2017, 12:18:48 pm
There was no patch for idiots still running XP/Server 2003 until this week.


A new publicly available tool is able to decrypt infected PCs running Windows XP and 7, and 2003, and one of the researchers behind the decryptor said it likely works for other Windows versions, including Vista, Server 2008, and 2008 R2.

https://arstechnica.com/security/2017/05/more-people-infected-by-recent-wcry-worm-can-unlock-pcs-without-paying-ransom/


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on November 07, 2017, 01:57:13 pm
(Pants On Fire)  We need back doors to fight terrorists!

FBI unable to break into Texas church gunman's cellphone
http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-texas-church-shooting-20171107-story.html

(or just pay the Israelis for more of the tech they use to spy on their own people).



Recent history:

The FBI didn’t need an iPhone backdoor — $100 of electronics does the same thing
http://bgr.com/2016/09/20/iphone-encryption-password-hack/


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: sgrizzle on November 12, 2017, 07:34:32 pm
(Pants On Fire)  We need back doors to fight terrorists!

FBI unable to break into Texas church gunman's cellphone
http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-texas-church-shooting-20171107-story.html


FBI claims Apple won't help them and refuses to help.

Apple provides documentation they didn't refuse anyone and even offered to help but were refused by the FBI.

Real story: FBI would just really like it if everyone would quit locking their stuff. Also leave your front door open.


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: patric on November 19, 2017, 04:50:37 pm
FBI claims Apple won't help them and refuses to help.

Apple provides documentation they didn't refuse anyone and even offered to help but were refused by the FBI.

Real story: FBI would just really like it if everyone would quit locking their stuff. Also leave your front door open.


Texas Rangers serve Apple with warrants for access to Sutherland Springs shooter's iPhone

Two days after the shooting the FBI's San Antonio office head, Christopher Combs, complained that encryption was preventing investigators from accessing Kelley's data. The iPhone was at some point flown out to an FBI lab in Quantico, Va., but without success.

Law enforcement may have missed a critical window during which they could have tried to use Kelley's fingers to unlock his iPhone without a passcode, though it's not certain that would have worked. Regardless, investigators reportedly failed to contact Apple during that window, leading to Apple itself getting in touch after seeing Combs' press conference.


http://appleinsider.com/articles/17/11/18/texas-rangers-serve-apple-with-warrants-for-access-to-sutherland-springs-shooters-iphone


Title: Re: fbiOS
Post by: heironymouspasparagus on November 20, 2017, 07:52:51 am

Texas Rangers serve Apple with warrants for access to Sutherland Springs shooter's iPhone

Two days after the shooting the FBI's San Antonio office head, Christopher Combs, complained that encryption was preventing investigators from accessing Kelley's data. The iPhone was at some point flown out to an FBI lab in Quantico, Va., but without success.

Law enforcement may have missed a critical window during which they could have tried to use Kelley's fingers to unlock his iPhone without a passcode, though it's not certain that would have worked. Regardless, investigators reportedly failed to contact Apple during that window, leading to Apple itself getting in touch after seeing Combs' press conference.


http://appleinsider.com/articles/17/11/18/texas-rangers-serve-apple-with-warrants-for-access-to-sutherland-springs-shooters-iphone


You would think by now they would already have everyone's fingerprint available...I know they have dozens of mine...